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1

Try to set your date one day ahead of today. Close than open your browser again. Hope it would work.


2

You might want to double-test other elements of your rules - it looks to me that they don't accept either HTTP or HTTPS traffic - I wonder if while fiddling with the rules you added (and possibly subsequently removed) HTTPS traffic - leaving the "ESTABLISHED" connection in-tact and giving you a false reading. You can test this theory by using iptables -vnL ...


1

It's both. They are running an SSL web site on port 3500. That's why both protocol (https) and port (3500) have to be specified. http is the wrong protocol; and 443 (the default port) is the wrong port.


75

Since HTTPS is designed to prevent snooping, Microsoft Family Safety would be unable to monitor the encrypted traffic unless it performs what is essentially a man-in-the-middle attack. It accomplishes this by decrypting and re-encrypting communications using Microsoft's own key. Such tampering, of course, does not go unnoticed. Firefox dutifully reports ...


0

If the SSL is encrypted end-to-end with keys you don't have access to, and one of the ends isn't the box you're trying to filter from, there is no (efficient) way to do this with SSL. That's the point of encryption. You could attempt to execute a man in the middle attack against one of the ends of the connection, but: That may or may not be illegal, ...


0

This seems to cover it: When tunneling SSL, the proxy must not have access to the data being transferred in either direction, for sake of security. The proxy merely knows the source and destination addresses, and possibly, if the proxy supports user authentication, the name of the requesting user. ... CONNECT is really a lower-level function than the ...


5

Your local sys-admin can track your browsing history if they can get you to install a certificate on your (or their machine) - in which case they can man-in-the-middle your connection. If you have your own device and are sure they don't have a certificate, the best they can do is get a feel for what sites you are going to by looking at the IP address of the ...


2

So my does it imply that even my local sys-admin can't keep track of my browsing history too? No, not necessarily. A sysadmin can perform a man in the middle attack if they put a custom certificate on the client computer. If you click on the lock icon in the address bar of a secure site at home, it will say who the certificate issuer is and what the ...



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