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20

I wonder what each interface is. lo0 = loopback gif0 = Software Network Interface stf0 = 6to4 tunnel interface en0 = Ethernet 0 fw0 = Firewire en1 = Ethernet 1 vmnet8 = Virtual Interface vmnet1 = Virtual Interface Something like that. Also, which of these is the IP interface ? There hasn't been "the" IP interface since many years ago. All of ...


17

Neither Windows or Linux is aware of its external IP address, so they cannot natively let you know. So you have to use an external service to find out what the IP address is. Under linux, you can use curl and one of the many services that let you know what your address is: $ curl ip.alt.io 123.123.123.123 There are equivilent options for Windows, such ...


16

systat -ifstat 1 Is much better. You gonna get traffic throughput, Peak and Total.


16

From Why iproute2?: Most Linux distributions, and most UNIX's, currently use the venerable arp, ifconfig and route commands. While these tools work, they show some unexpected behaviour under Linux 2.2 and up. For example, GRE tunnels are an integral part of routing these days, but require completely different tools. With iproute2, tunnels are an ...


10

Simple answer: On Linux ifconfig is obsolete. From man ifconfig: This program is obsolete! For replacement check ip addr and ip link. For statistics use ip -s link.


6

Also, on Apple portables en0 is Ethernet and en1 is Airport(WiFi). Mac Pro's will have en3 as well as they have two Ethernet NICs and Airport(WiFi). vmnet# is usually created by VMs(Parallels/VMWare)


5

The ip command is part of the iproute2 collection of utilities. According to the Linux Foundation the ifconfig command should be deprecated, but most distros still include them. iproute2 also contains the tc (traffic control) command. See usage information by using the $ man ip command. There was a discussion about this on serverfault last year.


5

Any routing table which has multiple default routes with equal metrics does load balancing. The case with a mac though is that it will select the first interface which is in the interface list. If you want to see and change the list, go to "open network preferences", here you will see a list of network interfaces like ethernet, airport, ppp through mobile or ...


5

You likely have your machine set to DHCP at boot... Do: sudo vi /etc/sysconfig/networking-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 change BOOTPROTO to BOOTPROTO="static" Then add in your settings... Mine looks like this: DEVICE="eth0" BOOTPROTO="static" BROADCAST="192.168.254.255" DNS1="192.168.254.25" GATEWAY="192.168.254.254" HWADDR="F2:24:08:AE:93:10" ...


5

You can use curl or dig but even wget curl -s icanhazip.com # or curl -s ident.me dig +short myip.opendns.com @resolver1.opendns.com There are many site that offer this kind of services. If you need to know it often you can add in your alias file (usually ~/.bash_alias) or on .bashrc the following alias alias getmyip='dig +short ...


4

There are several possible reasons.  Different interface types One possibility: ifconfig delegates printing of the hardware address to the interface implementation. Actual printing is performed by a function in the interface struct for the specific interface in net-tools-1.60 (from here), called by lib/interface.c, line 678: printf(_("HWaddr %s "), ...


4

A Google search for What's my IP address works quite well. Your public IP address is ##.###.###.178 You can also get some information about your network to give you a good idea about what is going on. Using tools like netstat, traceroute, ssh or telnet you can figure out how you are getting on the puplic network of the Internet. There are the ...


3

Yes. The network card's onboard memory buffers are mapped into memory so the CPU can copy data into and out of them as the card sends and receives packets.


3

ifconfig provides the MAC address of your network interface, while arp provides the MAC address of other hardware on the network, such as your router.


3

Reading file /usr/local/share/munin/plugins/if_ (in port sysutils/munin-node) I see it's using the following command line to achieve just that : /usr/bin/netstat -i -b -n -I $INTERFACE PS: that file also contains a warning that those are 32 bit counters; some years ago I RTFS and verifier that's because it's easier to update atomically; I didn't verify if ...


3

The script /etc/vpnc/vpnc-script is called on various events, including connect and disconnect. This sounds like you are using ubuntu or debian. If you are, the scripts /etc/vpnc/vpnc-script-disconnect-action and /etc/vpnc/vpnc-script-post-disconnect-action are called for the relevant events. You can create those files if they don't exist, and put ...


3

(This assumes that you are running Mint, and that Mint didn't change anything from Debian on this matter) You need an auto line: auto eth1 Otherwise, the interface will not be handled by the init.d/networking script. This way, the interface is started when networking is started, reconfigured if networking is reloaded/restarted and stopped when ...


2

This is intentional. The aliases were added because in IPv4 you could usually only have one IP address on an interface. The aliases were added to work around that. With IPv6 multiple addresses per interface are very normal so the aliases are not used anymore. The ifconfig tool is not the easiest tool to manage this though. The ip tool makes this much ...


2

ifconfig is grabbing your local, NAT'd IP address. curl ifconfig.me is grabbing the public IP provided to you by your ISP.


2

TShark and tcpdump will put the interface into promiscuous mode unless you tell them NOT to do so with the -p flag - -p doesn't mean "promiscuous mode", it means "not promiscuous mode". -I turns on monitor mode. Note that if you're on a "protected" network using encryption, i.e. a network using WEP or WPA/WPA2, capture filters other than at the link layer ...


2

You can find your public IP address by browsing to the site http://www.whatismyip.com from the computer that you want to find the IP address for


2

It's a link local address, used to exchange traffic with other machines on the same local network. Each IPv6 Ethernet interface assigns itself a link local address based on its hardware address. Unlike IPv4, IPv6 requires a link-local address to be assigned to every network interface on which the IPv6 protocol is enabled, even when one or more routable ...


2

The IP address listed in ifconfig is that applied to the network adaptor itself. The differing IP address present on your Google search is most likely due to Network Address Translation configuration on your router/firewall translating your RFC1918 source IP to the "WAN" or "public" IP address provided by your ISP.


2

Macs are based on BSD, not linux, so there are some differences. in this case, bsd uses 'enX' for interface names, instead of 'ethX'. As for the IP address, @Big Perm is correct, your router (or your ISP's hardware) is using NAT to translate your local address into a public IP address, which is what google sees.


2

I suggest you read this (or the whole page, which is very well written): http://alien.slackbook.org/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=slackware:network#re_starting_a_network_interface You can run ifconfig ... up or down to activate/deactivate an interface. But this doesn't configure the interface which is necessary to connect. As stated in the slackbook page you linked ...


2

http://osxdaily.com/2008/01/17/how-to-spoof-your-mac-address-in-mac-os-x/ there are extended directions at the bottom of this page using the "ln" command. it will work on 10.6.6 after you wait for "connection timeout" error when joining a fake ssid.


2

For eth0: sudo ifconfig en0 192.168.100.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 The route add default 192.168.100.1 may need to be adjusted if it isn’t the default route. EDIT: Fixed the route. Also don’t generally use the zero address for a node in the network unless you know what you are doing.


2

I am not sure if I understand correctly. But you have 1 Wireless gateway and 3 Devices connected to it? So doing ifconfig only shows PHYSICAL hardware/connections on the PC that ran the command - not the connections available or other device. ifconfig stands for interface configuration An interface if a virtual or physical layer on the computer that ...


2

ifconfig shows you interfaces. I.e., you might see an entry for each wired (physical) connection, and one for your wireless. What ifconfig does not show you is connections. You might be serving hundreds of file transfers to as many connected systems via ethernet, and you would still only see that one ethernet card in ifconfig.



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