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13

To flesh out Sathya's answer a bit: In most systems, the same PCIe lanes are used for both the IGP and the PCIe-x16 slot for the video card. So either the slot can be used or the IGP. This means you can't even put non-video card devices (e.g. RAID controllers) into the x16 slot without losing access to the IGP -- you'd still have to install a video card in a ...


10

The core differences of integrated graphics processors (IGPs) vs dedicated video cards (GPUs) are : IGPs uses significantly less power and generate less heat than GPUs IGPs uses/shares main system memory whereas GPUs have dedicated memory IGPs are performs significantly lower compared to GPUs (especially Intel IGP solutions) On a desktop, if an IGP breaks ...


10

It doesn't sound like you would benefit from adding a PCI-E video card. It may provide slight benefits, but most likely you wouldn't be able to tell the difference. If you were to do full screen video playback (DVD Quality), games (especially 3D) or CAD, then you would probably want an upgrade. Dual displays would also benefit, if you card supported ...


9

I am asking that, If I increase my RAM to 3 GB, will it increase my shared graphics memory ? No. If you look at the GMA 3000 whitepaper(pdf warning) the GMA 3000 supports up to 256MB as shared video memory. video memory of 384 MB for Intel GMA X3000 and 256 MB for Intel GMA 3000 Adding more RAM will improve your system performance since it'll ...


7

Yes, it does use electricity (if it were not, then it wouldn't be detected by whatever OS you are running). Have a look at this idle power consumption graph (similar figures here). Your numbers for the listed cards most likely will be smaller, as you do not even have a monitor plugged into the card - but power consumption will not be zero. To convert Watts ...


7

There is no one answer fits all. I have had motherboards with the same chipset and integrated graphics, but on one it allowed and the other it did not. Without knowing your motherboard, it is not possible to know - however ask the manufacturer or just try it. In any case, you will most likely need to set it in the BIOS, you may be able to go in there now ...


6

APU stands for Accelerated Processing Unit a term that AMD usually use, an APU is just really the CPU and GPU integrated into one chip, whereas an integrated GPU is a GPU that's on the motherboard itself. So... APU - CPU & GPU Combined Integrated GPU - CPU and GPU Separate. Intel has released new CPUs codenamed SandyBridge, these processors have ...


6

This depends on a lot of factors. Let's make some assumptions. Your video card consumes 10W under idle conditions (monitor turned off due to power save). Your video card consumes 35W under low-load conditions (using business productivity apps or web browsing without video). Your video card consumes 100W under high-load conditions (3D video games, high res ...


6

If you want to know the actual savings, get a Kill-A-Watt. Run the computer for one month with the video card and one month without. Compare the actual kilowatt-hours used and multiply that by your electricity rate for cost comparison.


6

No it won't. The graphics card has memory that is only used on the graphics card itself. However increasing your computer's memory does increase perceived graphics performance, due to the fact that the system itself is running faster. Looking at this article by Tom's Hardware, shows that actually the amount of memory on a card doesn't make as much of a ...


5

I am successfully using a Korean 27" IPS display (Crossover 27Q) at 2560x1440@60Hz in Linux over a VGA cable, with an old (GM45) Intel chipset. To my surprise, the hardware can drive the image just fine at that resolution over VGA. The image is relatively sharp, but there are some "ringing" artifacts to the right of hard intensity transitions. The most ...


5

This depends a lot on your definitions: Is Windows really using a 3D card for daily stuff? No, not really. Is Windows really using hardware accelerated compositing for daily stuff? Most definitely. Do you need a $300 card for 2D acceleration & Aero? No. Pretty much any on-board graphics produced in the past few years will provide that these days, and I ...


5

Since Intel is one of the few companies that actively support open source drivers for their GPUs, they are probably the most robust GPU you could use under Linux right now because of that alone. Personally I would buy an Intel graphics card just for that, but sadly nobody makes video cards with Intel GPUs. Dual monitor support depends on the connectors on ...


5

There is no one answer. If this is a headless machine that you will only be using remotely, set it to the minimum. If you are going to be playing games, using anything graphically intensive or complex, set it the maximum. One word of warning, (mainly to people coming here from Google), 32Mb is a "safe" amount, some older motherboards let you set this as ...


5

From the manual for that motherboard: Page x: Dual VGA output supports: RGB & DVI, DVI & DP, and RGB & DP Page 1-19: Due to chipset limitaion, when a DisplayPort monitor is plugged in, PCIe x 16 slot may not be able to support an add-on card. Set the DisplayPort Configuration item in teh BIOS to [Enabled] before using the ...


5

Just to make sure you know... you won't just be replacing the processor. You'd be replacing the motherboard as well. No, don't get insulted. I'm not assuming that you didn't know this. You didn't mention it, so I did. What happens when you put a dedicated video card in a system with an integrated video card? Well... let's put it this way. Let's assume ...


4

first, try re-booting with JUST the DVI connected. it may be that defaulting to VGA as primary is causing you problems. if that still fails, go into your display properties and look for dual monitor settings and see if it's showing up as a second disabled monitor that needs enabling. Also try getting latest drivers from the AMD/ATi site rather than from ...


4

Well, that really depends on what kind of graphics you are doing. The integrated graphics in Sandy Bridge are very, very good for an integrated solution. So good, in fact, that they rival low-end discrete graphics cards. If the most graphically intensive thing you do is watch movies or edit the occaisonal photo, Sandy Bridge integrated graphics are probably ...


4

This will depend on the motherboard/BIOS. Some allow the onboard graphics others don't. It appears that the Asus doesn't and to run a second monitor you'll have to use the 2nd output on the graphics card. You don't have to buy a DVI lead - though using one will give you a better image - you can get DVI to VGA converters and use your existing lead.


4

For Nvidia based cards of all varieties I would have gone straight to the Nvidia website rather than the reseller (EVGA, XFX or whoever) and checked out the specifications of the card there. Picking one at random the Geforce GTX 570 specifications page immediately lists the maximum resolutions for both VGA cable and digital links: 2560x1600 Maximum ...


4

This is normal for mobile GPUs. At one point nVidia made a system where card would be able to use both its own RAM and system RAM. After that they presented some graphics cards with 32 MiB and 64 MiB of RAM. They could use system RAM, so their total amount of RAM would be 128 MiB and 256 MiB, if I remember correctly. Basically, the dedicated video memory is ...


4

Modern integrated GPUs work the same way as those dedicated cards with the exception that they share memory with the CPU. They are typically less powerful than the ones on dedicated cards but functionally they work the same. Internally they are massively parallel processing units. The drivers and GPUs break up the task of 3D rendering into multiple ...


4

If the computer is especially slow while moving around windows or doing graphical stuff, maybe you do not have the correct video driver installed (assuming you still have a graphic card on the mainboard or that you have installed a new graphics card). In any case, check under Start-Menu -> right-click Computer -> Manage -> Device Manager what video card is ...


3

A little digging indicates that that chipset supports dual monitors in theory, and most modern motherboards/chipsets seem to support dual and triple monitors. There's also nothing in the motherboard that indicates that you cannot - it does state that the DVI connector is digital only (which makes sense). Looking at the manual (page 6) the two graphics ...


3

If you open your nvidia control panel Select manage 3d settings Global Settings tab switch the drop down from Auto to nvidia Reboot your computer If you just want specific executables use the program settings tab and if it is not listed browse for it and add it. Been messing with it on my machine and it seems to not allow you to switch for dwm.exe


3

The integrated graphics will have its own connector, so if you wanted to save power by powering down the GPU (somehow?) you'd need to physically change the connectors. A KVM switch would also do the job. The extra connector could be used to run another screen, but your GTX 460 can already power two. It can however be useful for diagnosing problems with ...


3

Tom's hardware has the best comparison information that I have found. From this table it would appear the current generation Intel HD integrated graphics are about equal to the lowest end discrete ATI & nVidia cards of 3 generations ago (nVidia 6600 or ATI X1400). AndrejaKo's link does not specify which Intel integrated graphics processor the N550 ...


3

Check your BIOS. You need to either: Disable the on-board graphics, possibly by disabling any shared graphics memory (or setting allocation to automatic). Or Set the primary adapter to be the dedicated card, PCI-e x16 or similar (BIOS dependant).


3

It's worth pointing out that a number of the affordable PCI-E graphics cards essentially give you the same performance and behavior (shared memory) as onboard video would. I recall a particular "turbo" line of cards that was nothing of the sort. Sometimes, if you're often running out of memory, you want to get a card with dedicated memory just so that you ...



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