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105

The current line of Xeons are based on the same architecture as the i7. The difference is usually that the Xeons are the cream of the crop. They run cooler and at lower voltages and are spec'd for 24/7 continuous usage. Otherwise, performance is usually identical. Xeons are able to be used in multi-socket motherboards, where i7s are not (which is why the Mac ...


38

I think you don't understand what 1 PCIe lane is. Many devices use more than 1 lane. For example - gaming graphics cards use 16 lanes. Some powerful gaming computers have two graphics cards - thats 32 PCIe lanes (two x16 ports). Intel i7-5820K can't handle two x16 graphics cards. For some gaming enthusiats or some engineers that may be a serious problem. ...


32

I have an i7 2600K and P8Z68-V LE. It should be similar in your computer. The hardware virtualization setting is located in Advanced mode->Advanced tab->CPU Configuration-> Intel Virtualization Technology According to this page, your i7 2600 will support VT-x and VT-d. My "K" (unlocked version) only supports VT-X (so Intel can still sell Xeons) so yours may ...


28

Another difference between Xeon and i7 is that the Xeon supports ECC memory, the i7 does not. Also, some Xeons are designed to work in multi-CPU systems, whereas absolutely no i7 models do. As such, if you want a multi-CPU system, you must use nothing less than a Xeon.


25

From looking up some stats on Sandy Bridge CPU temperatures it seems your 60 degrees Celcius is indeed quite high. Should you be worried? Well not if it stays at 60 degrees Celcius, so I recommend you do a stress test like Super Pi or Prime95 and keep an eye out what this does to the temperature. Looking at some overclocking temperatures from ...


21

Definitely does. You want to talk about Nehalem first, the quad-core should be discussed after that. Start from the Wikipedia notes on Nehalem ArsTechnica articles -- What you need to know about Intel's Nehalem CPU Intel's Nehalem simply sizzles -- Don't go by the title, but do look at the points With i7, soon you will say ta-ta to the North Bridge even on ...


14

You cannot put a notebook CPU in a desktop motherboard. If you want a notebook CPU in your desktop, you basically need to put notebook components in a desk case. There are some companies that do that, but it costs a lot. What you can probably do is buy a low-end desktop CPU that will have a low TDP. These, however, are likely to have relatively poor ...


12

Nope - DDR2 and DDR3 are electrically different and not cross compatible. Pic: DDR3 on the top. DDR2 below. Edit: Nice diagram in this answer too: Can you tell DDR and DDR2 apart visually?


12

The i7 supports 8GB per memory controller. There are 3 controllers, 24GB max. Check out i7 datasheet. This is a chip design decision - a function of the interface to the chip.


12

They do, but they're referred to as "Workstations". Workstations are essentially a server, but with expansion abilities more like a desktop. You get all the benefits of a server (symmetric multiprocessing, stability, management, hot-swap, etc.) plus the things you wouldn't normally have in a server, like video card(s). Check out Intel's Workstation ...


12

cpu load in bios can range from 80-100% depending on the mobo, which surprised me (I thought the cpu would be sitting close to idle in Bios This is easily explainable. If you boot into DOS, you will also see the temperature rise. Why? Because back in the days that DOS and BIOSes were first written, overheating was not really a problem, so there was no ...


11

You're mixing two things up... x58 is a chipset used on the motherboards for i7 processors, x86 is the family of Intel processors that i7 is still a part of. To kind-of answer your question, i7 is still part of the natural progression of Intel processors, latest and greatest... and if you want to use it you will likely be using an x58-based motherboard to ...


11

File compression and CD ripping are probably being limited by your laptops IO subsystem. The usual benefit of a faster CPU is that you can do something else while it is ripping/compressing etc. If you usually wait for a single task to complete before starting the next task then you probably wasted your money buying more CPU than you actually need - at ...


10

Depending on the application, some applications are only coded to utilize 1 or 2 cores. In order for you to see a performance gain with a quad core processor, the application must be designed to support the extra cores. For example: http://www.legionhardware.com/articles_pages/starcraft_ii_wings_of_liberty_beta_performance,7.html


10

My guess would be that it is throttling down due to heat issues. Find an app that can report CPU temperature and see if the temperature rise correlates to a drop in CPU throughput.


10

At one point, at wholesale, memory makers were changing designs by the week (well, month, but it felt very quick!), so if you bought in bulk from a supplier, even buying smallish quantities such as 10 sticks, you could get three or four different designs - it was a nightmare as dual channel (back then) didn't always work as some designs were to different ...


9

This will vary from board to board, but there should be an explicit BIOS option for "Intel SpeedStep" or "EIST" that you can disable. EDIT: Also, I believe you have it backwards. SpeedStep is responsible for downthrottling, not upthrottling; you'll run at the base clockspeed if you turn it off. Turbo Boost is what upthrottles (but I believe SpeedStep does ...


8

You should be able to do that using the performance monitoring tool that comes with windows 7, which is a 'snap-in of your management console 3.0. I have windows 7 professional, i am not sure if its integrated in Home Edition. just hit your 'windows'-button and enter perfmon in the textfield (search programs/files). once that is open you can unfold ...


8

You might have to set the boot device, but generally no, you don't have to set anything up. I'd still open it up and LOOK at the settings, just to see what's available for changing later.


8

Many computers have BIOS options to disable cores. You can also disable hyper threading which is also disabling cores, though I doubt that would improve cooling much. A final thing that could be done is in Windows itself. Go to the Advanced Boot Options (msconfig > boot tab > Advanced options) and specify the number of cores you want to use. I ...


7

Sounds wierd, the i7 should be shipped with heat sinks having thermal compound pre-applied to the base. Are you sure there isn't any on the bottom of the heat sink? Or a thermal pad installed?


7

Quoting here: All Sandy Bridge designs also incorporate a dual-channel DDR3 controller, suggesting that the triple-channel system used by the LGA 1366 platform is being sidelined. “We’ve found a very high percentage of clients will only tolerate two memory channels,” explained Opher Kahn, senior principal engineer for Sandy Bridge. “OEMs wanting to ...


7

A PCIe 'lane' consists of 2 differential pairs of signals. One differential pair is used for sending and the other is used for receiving, which allows simultaneous bi-directional communication. Each lane is point-to-point. That is, each lane directly attaches a single host to a single device. PCIe switches can, however, be used when a host lane needs to be ...


6

Adam isn't wrong, but I think he missed the biggest driver. The E7-8893 v2 is intended for octa-processor systems. Meaning they will have eight of these beasts in a single motherboard. (That's what the first "8" means in the processor number, based on the Xeon naming scheme.) Since having 8 CPUs is such a rare thing, intended for such specialized ...


6

One core, with or without hyper-threading, can simulate any number of virtual cores, simply by timeslicing. However, this produces all kinds of problems because the operating systems expect that code running at the same time will actually interleave. Overprovisioning can lead to performance drops so great the system can appear frozen with operations ...


6

Do you have Hyper-V installed? For example it may have been added if you installed the Windows Phone emulators which come with Visual Studio 2012 & 2013. If so, then there is a known conflict between Hyper-V and VirtualBox - Hardware Virtualisation support not detected if Hyper-V installed. A similar problem occurs trying to use Intel HAXM to ...


6

Different Uses and Environments Consumer-grade Core processors are designed for everyday desktop or gaming applications and are therefore optimized to operate at higher clock speeds. Most consumer applications cannot take advantage of more than a few processor cores and would benefit significantly more from a processor that operates at 4+ GHz than having 8 ...


6

You'll want to look for a board that is identified as having "B3 Stepping" for the chip-set. Sometimes listed as a "Rev. B3" and sometimes there will be an "Intel Revised" logo, depends on the motherboard manufacturer for the most part, but they all tried pretty hard to ensure it was obvious that it had it. CPU-Z can help you identify it on a running ...


6

The Intel i series tends to do this. They have a certain thermal limit built in and basically manage the system such that: if you are running on all cores, it manages speed among them and tries to run the system as fast as it can without overheating. If you aren't running all cores, it will shut down the cores that aren't used and try to overclock the ...


6

There are certainly lots of changes and improvements, it's not just marketing speak, there are genuine improvements. I haven't tried one personally, but there are two features that I would consider looking at for potential performance gains: 1) Re-implemented Hyper-threading. Each of the four cores can process up to two threads simultaneously (with some ...



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