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28

You can use the tool Securable from Gibson Research to find out if your hardware supports virtualization extensions. If it tells you that your hardware is supported, but not enabled, check the BIOS settings to enable it.


12

Start your PC, press F2, go to the security option and enable VT technology.


10

Replace the power supply and stress test your computer. Reseat (or replace) your heatsink and reapply thermal paste. Run +memtest on the RAM. Check all cabling; reseat the SATA/IDE cables to your hard drives. Clean out the dust as best you can. -- 49 isn't that high of a temp. What heatsink are you using?


8

No. Pentium D is basically two P4 Netbursts on the same silicon. Core 2 Duos are newer, faster, and more efficient.


6

The only technical requirement to be able to install a 64bit version of an OS is that the CPU supports 64bit extentions. Most CPU's by AMD and Intel in the last couple years have included the 64bit extentions (AMD64/EM64T) Your motherboard would most likely not prevent you from installing a 64bit OS, but you may not be able to go beyond 4gb of RAM ...


6

Your processor does support VT-X, you'll just need to enable it in the BIOS settings. Reboot your computer and press the specified key on the boot screen to go into the BIOS Setup and enable it.


4

You might also consider the hidden cost of power usage: at load (if you plan to do folding or something else that loads the cores 100%) at idle (if it's a typical desktop / server, it is idle the vast majority of the time)


4

Even though they share the same socket- Socket 775- and may run on the same motherboards, they are not the same. The Pentium D uses 2 Netburst architecture CPU cores on separate dies (two chips, one package), each with a small cache, sharing a single "quad pumped" Front Side Bus of 533 or 800 MT/s throughput (4 x 100MHz x 2=Double Data Rate) for desktop ...


4

Until your load temps get close to Tj. Max (Temperature Junction Max -- the maximum temperature Intel rates the processor for, beyond which it will throttle itself to cool down) there is absolutely nothing to worry about. Since you're about 42 degrees away, even under load, I think you're quite safe...


4

If they have the same socket type (i.e. Socket 775) then a Core 2 Quad should work in place of a Core 2 Duo. At worst it may be a bios upgrade is necessary but other than that it should just work.


4

Does anyone know why this is happening Its called SpeedStep how to fix it? There's nothing to "fix" per-se, as and when the load increases, the frequency will bump up. Also, Under Microsoft Windows XP, SpeedStep support is built into the power management console under the control panel. In Windows XP a user can regulate the processor's ...


4

According Intel's processor/motherboard compatibility tool that motherboard is not compatible with that CPU ("This combination is not compatible."). You're lucky it's running at all. :) My guess would be that that motherboard just doesn't support a 333MHz bus speed with an 8.5 multiplier, which is what would get you that 2.8GHz. Instead (as you've ...


4

Core2 is the name is the name for a microarchitecture. It encompasses a whole CPU family There are single core CPU's based on the core2 architecture. There are dual core core2 CPU's based on the core2 architecture. (Often called core2 duo) There are quad core core2 CPU's based on the core2 architecture. (Often called core2 quad). Thus calling a core 2 ...


3

Although either is possible, both seem unlikely. In my personal experience (decades doing repair work) a PS rarely fails without giving some kind of advance indication. To rule it out, see if you can borrow one from a friend. Most PS are fairly standardized, and unless you go for something elaborate, not too expensive. Before you get into changing parts, ...


3

Have you considered setting up something like Folding@Home This will use all your CPU, and by default it will be at the lowest priority meaning that almost anything else you run will get preference. Plus you can feel good about your contribution to humanity.


3

Give cpulimit a try. For example cpulimit -e cpuburn -l 20 would limit a process called cpuburn to maximum of 20% CPU. Use cpulimit with some CPU hungry software such as SETI@Home or cpuburn and you should have a winning combo.


3

You haven't specified price in this equation, which allows for a simplified answer that does not depend on any personal preferences: The new one is faster. Why? The i7 definitely beats the Core 2 Duo (even if the speed seems higher, the i7 delivers much more performance than a C2D) 1333 MHz RAM beats 1067 MHz RAM. You can look at some benchmarks that ...


3

A little searching yielded this nice article from anandtech: http://www.anandtech.com/show/2056/4 This is just a snippet of the article comparing the two chips you ask about, there's lots more information in it. The page i link gives a side by side comparison of the processors specs. Hope it helps.


3

My work laptop has a Core 2 Duo and regularly gets up to 55C when working hard, I wouldn't consider it massively hot. There's a temperature guide for Core 2 Processors here. It does look rather confused, but hopefully it will make sense.


3

It is highly possible that your BIOS has not been updated to the latest version yet - thus the missing support for VT on your E8400. The latest version of your BIOS (v1005) can be found here (you will to navigate to the Supported CPUs page). Please update your BIOS and see if VT turns on for you.


3

SPEC is always a good reference for this kind of thing. Here are their data for those two CPUs. SPEC's result numbers are a ratio of the performance of the system to that of a Sun Ultra Enterprise 2. Roughly, the computer tested is "result" times faster than a UE2. Since all computers are referenced from that one benchmark, you can divide the results ...


3

I wouldn't count on it. I had an older machine with a Pentium 4. I was building a new machine and got a Pentium Dual Core (not even a core 2 duo), and I tried it out in the old machine. It didn't POST.


3

I am not saying no, but I wouldn't bet on it. The CPU limitation is mainly down to the chipset and not the actual socket it fits in to. Your best bet is to use a tool such as CPU-Z which should be able to give you your motherboard details, then you can confirm on their website what your board supports. Also, You may need to do a BIOS update to support it, ...


3

No, you can't be certain without the model. First generation Socket 775 Pentium 4,D, and XE motherboards may be incompatible due to different power requirements. Some motherboards may list compatibility with Pentium Dual Core as well as Core 2 Duo, and some may only list Core 2 Duo compatibility or vice-versa. Check with CPU-Z as already mentioned to be sure ...


3

I would take a look at all the linked articles here. That's quite a recent review of some of the higher end chips.


3

This may not be obvious. Its sometimes called vanderpool technology in the bios without mentioning virtualisation.


3

Removed my previous answer because it is just the same as other answers. Added another requirement. One of the most critical requirement for running a 64-bit OS is not just hardware, but the user too : User swears never to install anyhow drivers which might be 32-bit on a 64-bit OS. User must understand that just because 64-bit is two times of 32-bit, ...


3

Could you check which version of the Windows XP hardware abstraction layer your system is using? To do this, run devmgmt.msc, look at what item is displayed as the child of "Computer" in the tree, and add this info to your question: "ACPI Multiprocessor PC", "ACPI Uniprocessor PC", "Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) PC", "Standard PC", etc. ...


2

If you want to make from it hackintosh or use Intel compiler buy Intel otherwise buy Phenom II (because it's cheaper a bit).


2

I'm what you might call an Intel fanboy nowadays. The Intel chips perform a bit better and the prices are low enough now that there's not much difference compared to AMD. The main reason however that I prefer Intel is that I've been bitten by bad chipsets in the past when using AMD cpus.



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