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The RAM will clock down to the highest speed the CPU supports. However, you will still get some of the benefit of the faster RAM as the number of clock cycles needed will drop. For example, a RAM that has a CAS latency of 11 at its higher speed might have a CAS latency of 9 at a lower clock speed. It's not really fair to say the entire system will run at ...


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32 bit systems have supported more than 4 GB of RAM for well over a decade, through the use of PAE. That said, the specs say that your computer's maximum supported memory capacity is 4 GB, so it's 4GB, and what the chipset supports doesn't much matter. It might be a BIOS limitation, it might be that the system board only supports a maximum DIMM size of ...


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Only a problem if you get a card that simply fits into the pcie slot but wires into your motherboard (these used to come with some motherboards to add physical ports). Any normal add on card, eg https://www.anker.com/products/68UPPCIE-4SU will have its own controller and driver. Just make sure your OS is supported.


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The chipset supports some 64 bit chips, and if you had a 64 bit capable chip you certainly could. This chipset's around the time intel made the transition, and from checking a random sampling many of the chips it supports are 64 bit. However at the time the system was released, 64 bit windows wasn't really a thing. I suspect most systems ran xp, and 64 bit ...



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