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5

If you're are not listenting on the wireless network you won't be able to see most of the traffic on that network. Most wired networks these days are switched, such that you will only see traffic that is either from your machine or to your machine (either because it's sent directly to your system or because it's broadcast traffic sent to all systems on the ...


4

You can't sniff for the same reason you can't sniff the traffic of other users if you connect to a regular switch with a cable. The switch will forward packets only to ports where it knows the destination for the packet is, not to all ports (except when it does not know where the destination is). Some more expensive switches have special ports to which all ...


4

This depends on your ISP's DHCP Server. Each time you are leased a new IP address - it will be leased for a set perios of time (with my ISP, this is 8 days). Half way through that period of time (4 days in my case), the router will re-apply for its IP and be leased it for a further 8 days - this is known as the DHCP Half-life. If your router is off long ...


3

Because Ping is a broadcast-compatible service. A computer that receives such an echo request will happily reply.


2

the file works as an DNS server, it just resolve names CN to IP. If you use IP directly it doesn't do any resolve


2

I've also had this problem, and I solved it like this: create a WiFi hotspot: netsh wlan set hostednetwork mode=allow ssid=ProvaMi key=pippo123 netsh wlan start hostednetwork Assign the hotspot a name (in my case: "TestWIFI") Set a static IP address for the WiFi network: netsh interface ip set address "TestWIFI" static 192.168.159.1 255.255.255.0 ...


2

From the wiki here you can see the three reserved private addresses ranges IP address = 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255, subnet mask = 255.0.0.0 (corporate) IP address = 172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255, subnet mask = 255.240.0.0 (rarely seen) IP address = 192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255, subnet mask = 255.255.0.0 or more common 255.255.255.0 (home use) The subnet ...


1

As mentioned above, subnet masks can be used for any private or public network. There's no rule or logic that indicates only certain subnet masks can be applied to certain public or private networks. But to answer the question of what's different between 255.255.255.0 and 255.255.254.0... 255.255.255.0 allows for a total of 254 IP addresses to be used. 1 ...


1

You should be able to correlate the MAC address with IP using ARP. To perform a lookup, bring up command prompt and type in: arp -a If your MAC address is not listed here, ping your broadcast IP in your network to populate the arp table on your machine and then check again with arp -a.


1

Depending on the structure of your network, EtherApe is a graphical network monitor, but it's more for active monitoring, not logging to a file. You could use tcpdump to capture data over a long period and then use Wireshark to analyse that data and get visual representations. This all really depends on your network structure though, is all of your network ...


1

Given that this was originally asked on Information Security, rather than, say, Network Engineering, when you ask "Can I sniff the packets being sent to and from the wireless router even though I am connected through cable?", what you might really mean is "could somebody sniff the packets being sent to and from the wireless router...". If so, then the ...


1

Yes and no. No in the sense that you cannot directly link one of these ip addresses to that server as local ip address. But yes, you can use these ip addresses for those servers by simply using a router and port forwarding rules. How it works Your server has one or more network cards. Each network card will receive an ip address from the DHCP server, or ...


1

IPv4 addresses use 32 bits. For example the adddress 127.0.0.1 translated to binary is 01111111 00000000 00000000 00000001. For easy understanding instead of binary we, humans, use a decimal representation separating the 32 bits in 4 blocks of 8 bits. Each block of 8 bits can go from 00000000to 11111111, or in decimal from 0 to 255. The IP address is ...


1

Yes, but this is not an issue for you. Your router creates a new private network. The only thing you need to be careful for is if the range of your router is the same as the range outside. You mention you already have it set as 192.168.0.x where the building uses 192.168.1.x, so this should not be an issue for you. The DHCP broadcast will not reach your ...


1

Within your hosts file, you enter a name and an IP. This is so that your computer knows which IP to connect to when you enter a host name/web address - not the other way around. What you have placed into your hosts file will send you to 1.1.1.1 when you enter www.google.com into a web browser, not www.google.com when you enter 1.1.1.1. It acts similar to ...



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