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8

No, switches are not just simplified routers. Although many devices combine functions of both routing and switching, the two functions are distinct. Switches create networks, routers connect distinct networks together. Switches operate using only MAC-addresses, while routers also user IP addresses. Switches have many ports in the same subnet, while routers ...


5

There are several ranges of 'private' ip addresses, as defined in RFC1918. These are: 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 (10/8 prefix) 172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255 (172.16/12 prefix) 192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 (192.168/16 prefix) That an IP address starts with 192 doesn't necessarily mean it's a private IP address. For example the ISP ...


5

You'll need to perform a whois lookup to get information about an ip address. There are a few major organisations who keep track of IP addresses for certain areas, such as North America, South America, Europe, Asia, etc. There are also sites that will use all these databases and let you query globally. One of these sites is http://who.is Enter the IP ...


4

Reference Free Dynamic DNS No-IP Free Dynamic DNS is our entry level service. Use yourname.no-ip.info instead of a hard to remember IP address or URL to access your computer remotely. Additionally, use our free dynamic DNS update client to keep track of your dynamic IP address. You will always be able to access your computer even if your IP ...


4

No. Switches do the following: When something comes in on a port, it looks at the destination MAC address of the Ethernet frame it receives It looks in its CAM table for the MAC address. If it has seen that MAC address before, and knows what port the destination MAC is connected to, it forwards (resends) the frame out that port. If it has not seen that ...


3

I never knew about BITSAdmin. But I found this in the manual: BITSAdmin is deprecated and is not guaranteed to be available in future versions of Windows. You could also do it without BITSadmin (and with a little help from powershell) : @echo off set ip= powershell.exe -Command (New-Object ...


2

Not familiar with tablets running Win8 personally, but on a computer/laptop running Windows8, you can provide an "Alternate Configuration" that will be used if DHCP fails. If available, this is a separate tab on the same window where you would be changing from DHCP to static and back. All you need to do is enter your static IP information on the "Alternate ...


2

No. It very likely does not mean that the DoD is actually connecting to your router. Many ISPs are using the 22.0.0.0/8 range internally as it is not routed. The reason why they are doing this this are various. Some ISPs ran out of IPs in 10.0.0.0/8. Others want to avoid conflicts with their users running their own equipment in the general private use ...


2

Multiple A-records are allowed in the direct DNS-zone. But only one PTR-record is recommended in the reverse zone. That is why lot of hostnames can be resolved to the single IP, while each IP in general is resolved to the one hostname. All that primarily intended for name-based virtual hosts.


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You do not have a public IP address. The 100.64/10 address space is reserved for ISPs’ NATs (as opposed to 10/8, 172.16/12 and 192.168/16 which are available for the end user), and is not globally routable.


2

The Internet Protocol does not have an inherit way of disclosing the address of either party If you have control over those endpoints you could set up such as service, or simply capture an ICMP echo (ping) on the remote endpoint to see what IP it's being presented with Another solution would be to use netcat to open a simple server and connect to it, when ...


2

Since Windows 7, there are problems with having both the wired and wireless adapters active at the same time. It actually surprises me that you can get as much done with the two adapters being active in parallel. The only iron-cast solution, in my experience, is to have one adapter enabled and the other disabled. This apparently cleans-up whatever ...


2

First, "Class B" is irrelevant. If you were given a /24, it's a /24. There's no "default subnet mask" in that. Second, you're simply confusing terms: Working out the problem I seem to only get these networks What you listed are not networks. A network is a collection of addresses. Those are host addresses within a network (specifically, within the ...


2

The most used private network is 192.168.0.0 (/24). 192.168.0.1 is probably the most used IP address, so a lot of different hosts have the same IP adress. DNS returns host IP addresses and no network IP adresses, so you will always get the IP adress of a host and not of a network. To know what the network to an IP adress is, you have to know the subnet ...


2

The video you are linking to attempts to explain how the Internet works very simply. Which is admirable. But there are a lot of face-palm worthy movements in it where simplification veers off into complete miscommunication of the concept. The concept of how packet works is pretty cringeworthy because it implies that at each stage the packet—which in the ...


2

Your range goes from x.x.232.80 up to x.x.232.95 - this is a range of 16 addresses. However, you lose three of these. The first address is the network address and the last being the broadcast address. The network address needs to be reserved for routing to work, and the broadcast address is needed for.. broadcasts - where something needs to go to all ...


1

A quick search revealed to me this link. It suggests that you can use the net view command to view known computers NET VIEW [\\computername [/CACHE] | [/ALL] | /DOMAIN[:domainname]] NET VIEW displays a list of resources being shared on a computer. When used without options, it displays a list of computers in the current domain or network. \\computername ...


1

You can't use TCP/IP to communicate between the two machines as things stand; you need a router in between. Your switch might be able to act as a router, depending on its exact make and model. If you can change network settings on B, give it a new IP address in the same subnet as A and you'll be OK.


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A switch doesn't perform routing, unless it's a L3 switch. So either add a router to perform routing or do the following: Change the IP on machine A to an IP in the 172.17.1.0/24 subnet. You'll be able to access machine B. Change the IP settings on machine B and save it. At this moment you will lose connection, just change the IP settings on machine A ...


1

Definition: Routers are small physical devices that join multiple networks together. Technically, a router is a Layer 3 gateway device, meaning that it connects two or more networks and that the router operates at the network layer of the OSI model. Home networks typically use a wireless or wired Internet Protocol (IP) router, IP being the most common OSI ...


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Network 1 (192.168.0.xxx) and Network 2 (192.168.1.xxx). Computer A (192.168.0.10) wants to talk to Computer B (192.168.1.10). Am I correct in saying that we need a router to do this? If the networks are separate or are on different subnets, then yes you would need a routing device to get the data to transverse the networks. Is a router just a ...


1

You can use ifcfg.me. it supports some internal commands that come with windows by default. curl ifcfg.me nslookup . ifcfg.me telnet ifcfg.me ftp ifcfg.me


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I already faced a Linux router which wouldn't forward more than about 100kB/s for each connection. The issue was the Ethernet interface to the ISP equipment was set to half duplex. Fixed by disabling auto-negotiation and manually forcing full duplex. This could be done via ethtool: sudo ethtool -s eth1 speed 100 duplex full autoneg off


1

see page http://wtfismyip.com, http://wtfismyip.com/text actually on. Get ip address in the form of text. XML or JSON formats too. or get http://checkip.dyndns.com/ but format is "Current IP Address: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx"


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I use http://checkip.amazonaws.com/ curl -s http://checkip.amazonaws.com/ (This form miscounts the above 82 characters as 15 characters, so I have to enter an extra sentence.)


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Imagine you want to send a letter. You stick it in an envelope seal it, and then type the address of the final destination. You give the package to someone (or, drop it in a mailbox) and then the letter is taken to the post office where it is acknowledged with a stamp, and then routed off to its final destination. On the Internet, this process is a bit ...


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Because IP addresses are reachable from everywhere on the Internet, while Ethernet addresses are confined within the same network. IP uses routing – specific address prefixes, like 12.34.*.* or 56.7.89.*, are routed towards specific networks that "own" those addresses. These routes are distributed across the entire Internet using BGP. This works ...


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If you use one of the many "whois" sites, they will tell you who owns any IP you specify.


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devices like routers (including PCs set up as routers) need multiple interfaces by definition (at least one for each network the device will be a part of). Imagine the simple case of a network router that was on two networks, 192.168.0.1 (IF 1) and 10.0.0.1 (IF 2). it would have route rules that would route all traffic to 10.x.y.z out interface 2, and all ...


1

I method I used to use many years ago before I got my static IP was as follows. First off, find a service you can call to get your IP address. For example, these days if you Google "Whats My IP" EG: https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=whats+my+IP You'll get a search page that looks something like the following: Google's code is unfortunately a bit ...



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