New answers tagged

0

I'm not either in Oregon or Maine, but from my experience with networking - there is no bigger ISP which would have one big IP address pool for whole US. Usually IP pools are dedicated per area, and size of area is up to ISP. ISP could set IP pool for users from some region depending on their usernames (it's technically possible), but I never heard for such ...


0

Some of the methods for connecting a printer to a local network give the printer an IP address outside the range likely to be used by computers on the network, so you might want to check for such a printer.


0

After scouring the net using the correct search terms, I found thread after thread of people having issues with this router/modem. There were different ways people managed to get port forwarding to work correctly although most did not. The solution that worked for me was to open the advanced tab navigate to setup > WAN setup and check Respond to Ping on ...


0

You can check this program out, it's a little software that discover your devices in your network. by the way if you want the hostname of a device in your network you can ping it with the -a parameter: ping -a x.x.x.x Hope it helps you :)


2

You're going on the wrong assumption. Your Windows computer will give ITSELF an auto-IP address if it can't get an IP address from an DHCP server. This says NOTHING about the other device to which you want to connect. You must first figure out that other devices behaviour if it can't get an DHCP address. Some devices will also dynamically generate a ...


1

Power off the device. Connect your PC directly. The network interface should be up, but the ip, etc. doesn't matter. Turn off anything generating network noise. Run tcpdump or something else that dumps all traffic. When you're set up and ready to go, power on the device. If it does anything via IP on startup or otherwise, you should see it. Tcpdump is ...


1

First, note that Auto IP is configured independently by each device. Just because your computer auto-configures a link-local address for itself, does not mean the other device does. You would see identical behavior if the other device was using DHCP, or if it had a static address configured. You should use Wireshark/tcpdump to see what the other device ...


0

Do you have DHCP server in your network? 169.254.x.x address implies that that the device is configured to use DHCP but has not received address from server. If you have DHCP server make sure it is configured to give IP address to your device. (For example DHCP server might only give IPs to known macaddresses.) Then the device should get real IP address ...


0

The modem/router in question does not support NAT loopback. A way to get around this would be to point the device IP to the domain via the host file although this is not ideal. Example: 10.0.0.92 its.dirtrif.com Better off purchasing my own router/modem and get rid of the Comcast provided one, plus save 10$ on my bill every month. After reading a bit ...


0

On some routers, port 80 cannot be used for purposes other than accessing the routers config page - Some internet providers also prevent port 80 traffic for various reasons. I would use port 8080 instead for HTTP on your webserver. Do a rule forwarding port 8080 to port 80 on the IP address of the webserver. If you require your old IP then you will have to ...


1

Kick off all non-essential connections right now Nirsoft Currports should be able to do the job for you. It displays current open TCP/UDP connections/ports, and allows you to kill the connection. You can find it on the Nirsoft website. Work out a way to filter and monitor connections so this doesn't happen again Windows Advanced firewall should ...


0

Localhost is accessable even if the firewall is active on your PC blocking all incoming connections from your smartphone. So deactivate the firewall to test at first.


0

Localhost don't need wi-fi (It's not even sending the data out to the network). If you cut the internet the localhost will still be there. As far as I know you cannot access to your localhost from another device. 192.168 etc. is your local network not your localhost.


2

Let's look at the first part first: the left square bracket. The left square bracket simply specifies that the upcoming part is a literal address, as mentioned by RFC 3986 (page 19), which says: A host identified by an Internet Protocol literal address, version 6 [RFC3513] or later, is distinguished by enclosing the IP literal within square ...


8

::1/128 is the IPv6 loopback, it's just one address. It's a lot better than IPv4 addresses that reserve the entire 127.0.0.0/8 for loopback.


61

It is the IPv6 version of the loopback IP. In IPv4 you have 127.0.0.1, in IPv6 this is ::1. Actually, this is the reduced version of: 0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0001, but whenever you have several fields of zeros you can "zip" them with the "double colon" notation.


18

::1 is the loopback address in IPv6. It can be written as 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1. It is the equivalent of 127.0.0.1 in IPv4. The loopback address is a special IP address that is designated to the software loopback interface of a machine. The loopback interface has no hardware associated with it, and is not physically connected to a network.


0

A tunnel or VPN between the two can be useful but is not necessary – you can just use standard SMTP relay mechanisms. On the remote server, set up a TLS certificate and enable STARTTLS. Configure it to permit relaying for authenticated clients – you could use either regular username/password authentication, or TLS "client certificate" auth, depending on ...


2

Process Hacker is a tool that may suit your purposes. I install it on all my machines. Click on the "Network" tab and kill any unwanted connections from there. And as was suggested, you can add any unwanted domains to your HOSTS file in c:\windows\system32\drivers\etc


0

I wrote a bash script to do this but to also filter for machines with the name "swarm" in them. You could remove the filter or change it as needed. (remove | grep "swarm") You could use this as the full script or copy paste the one liner from it: #!/usr/bin/env bash # we make assumption that the VM's we want have the word swarm in their name. Edit for ...


1

Next to @acejavelin 's answer, there are various portmapping tools, capable to identify the background service. Many times, the a device has a HTTP or SMTP or SSH port, these services are also capable to say their software version (and thus, also the hardware version).


3

Looking up the MAC address in a database like http://aruljohn.com/mac.pl to see the vendor, this could narrow down the device. Or blacklist the MAC address so it can't get an IP address, or give it a static DHCP IP assignment that isn't valid and see who complains their device doesn't work.


0

It only worked when I assigned it to a static ip address. added this to /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcg-enp0s3 IPADDR = <add-ip-addr> PREFIX = <add-prefix> GATEWAY = <add-gateway> DNS1 = 8.8.8.8


0

Just wanted to add to Jonnos answer that admin@asus-rt-n18u:/tmp/home/root# grep asus.com /etc/* /etc/hosts:192.168.201.5 router.asus.com is how my (and most likely) your router do this. Your router is probably running asuswrt with dnsmasq. You can have shell access (at least via telnet) and look for yourself.


0

Check you router. Some of them let you block sites by domains or keywords and they cover subdomains as well. The feature can be found under various names like "Block Sites", "Parental Control" etc.


0

Unfortunately the "hosts" file does not support wildcards (*.example.com). So to do this you will need something a bit more involved - like blocking the domain through some security software or by running your own DNS server / resolver.


0

Had the same problem on a Windows 10 laptop, turned out to be AVG filter on the adapter settings (where the TCP ipv4 settings, etc are). Unchecked that and network started working again.


0

You can try if (oSession.HostnameIs("subdomain.example.com")){ oSession.bypassGateway = true; // Prevent this request from going through an upstream proxy oSession["x-overrideHost"] = "128.123.133.123"; // DNS name or IP address of target server } For more details check this link


0

TCP/IP layer model was introduced before the ISO model, emerged from the US DoD. The purpose of it was not introducing general standards or not as to be a description for all network communication. Here, the TCP or Transmission Control Protocol and IP or Internet Protocol are 2 standards. This model proposed 4 layers. Brief overview of TCP and IP ...


1

We have two layered models because the TCP/IP Model was first defined by the Department of Defense, where they only had one specific goal of creating a nationwide network. The OSI Model is the standard model created by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) which defines how software and hardware components involved in a network ...


0

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OSI_model TCP is layer 4. MAC is layer 2. IP addresses are layer 3.


3

An IPv4 address is just a 32-bit number, e.g. 00001010000010110000110000001101. The decimal octet notation is just to make it easier for humans to read. Each octet is 8 bits, e.g. 00001010.00001011.00001100.00001101, which is then converted to decimal numbers (10.11.12.13). Since 8 bits can represent the numbers from 0 to 255, each octet can on have a number ...


2

1-223 covers Class A/B/C networks, which are what your PC will use. 224+ is for Class D (Multicasting) and Class E (not used) networks, neither of which are appropriate for a Windows PC. Webopedia article on IP Addressing


-1

It is completely normal for NETSTAT to show this many TCP connections. Did you connect to the site the scammer told you to? If so, wipe/reload. If not, you're fine.


0

That's because you are not getting any IP to your interface enp0s3. It might be a missconfiguration on the DHCP server, your network settings for that vm or on the vm network configuration. Make sure that: your vm is on bridge or NAT mode, with the adapter connected. /etc/sysconfig/network and /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcg-enp0s3 have the right ...


0

It turns out it was Hamachi VPN! I forgot I had that installed. It uses that IP address range for its VPN these days and that's what it had picked up


0

Try setting DNS to a DNS service such as Google's. Preferred: 8.8.8.8 Alternate: 8.8.4.4 Initially I thought I was assigning the wrong address. While switching on DHCP after diagnostics helped, I wanted a static IP for pen test purposes. Setting the DNS to - in my case it was Google's DNS - worked.


2

DNS servers won't give you that information unless they give you transfer rights which they shouldn't unless it's your DNS server. That would be available through dig axfr domain.com @authoritativeDNSserver. I suppose if you had that access, you wouldn't ask that question. This would likely mean that you can't get what you're looking for.


1

You are correct, 150.16.7.255 is the broadcast address for the 150.16.0.0/21 subnet. 150.16.5.255 is a valid IP for a host on that subnet.


3

It is a perfectly valid IP address on the network 150.16.0.0/21. The host component of the address 101.11111111 is neither all zeros, or all ones. $ ipcalc 150.16.5.255/21 Address: 150.16.5.255 10010110.00010000.00000 101.11111111 Netmask: 255.255.248.0 = 21 11111111.11111111.11111 000.00000000 Wildcard: 0.0.7.255 ...


0

I found that you can't really automate queries to bgp.he.net, I kept getting 403 responses, and then when I faked a user agent, it tried to verify that I was indeed a real browser. I kind of failed in everything with bgp.he.net (even contacting the site). What DID work for me, was to query http://ipinfo.io as Ben Dowling said in another answer. I did a ...


0

Well this was possibly the worst question anyone could have asked... Actually my router was set to refresh the IP address pool for each device connected after 1 day (or 24 hours), and this explains this. The IPs I see are of devices which were disconnected from the router earlier but their IPs weren't refreshed.


0

Manual page is usually good start. man ssh is what you are looking for. There is synopsis: ssh [...] [user@]hostname [command] describing exactly what you need. If your Linux IP is 10.0.0.188 and your Linux user is mike, then: ssh mike@10.0.0.188


1

It is checking your Public IP not your local computer's IP. The public IP is assigned to your entire network by your ISP. This address may or may not be changed on a regular basis, depending on how they assign addresses.


0

Use Nmap to scan the network. You can find the ip from there. If there are lots of systems in your network sort out the ip by recording the other ip and removing it from the list so that you are left with ip of the embedded device. -Use zenmap if you need gui -Please use this only in your home network, or if you are authorized. Otherwise it is ...


1

When altering DNS settings, you should always keep in mind that such changes take time to propagate over the internet. It can take from 2 to 48 hours before changes are replicated through all hops on the internet. ipconfig /flushdns can be used to renew your DNS configuration with that from your router/modem/server (depending on what your DNS servers are) ...


-2

Use the commands Ipconfig /release This will release your current IP Address ipconfig /renew This will update your IP to whatever the newest one is. Then try accessing the website.


2

The depends on the resolution of Domain Names on your system. The easiest solution would be flushing the integrated cache for DNS entries in windows, by executing ipconfig /flushdns After cosulting the OS's own cache, it will ask the primary and secondary DNS server as configured in the IP settings - for a home user these settings are usually ...


-1

On my Centos I connected this way. Setting up internet connection (NAT, BOOTPROTO=DHCP ) , service network restart. Then find out IP - ip a - and use this IP in putty.



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