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2

Yes. You will be using one-to-one NAT to achieve the publicIP > privateIP mapping. TP-Link and Linksys offer these settings on some consumer price-point routers (80-$120). Verify in the product documentation before purchase. You'll usually find the setting under either 'Advanced > NAT > One-to-One NAT' or 'Setup > One-to-One NAT'. The documentation of your ...


0

Aside from arp -a, net view /all, or writing a batch script there is no native/built-in command line to do this (at least not that I know of). If you're willing to use a non-native command, I would suggest using Nmap. You can run nmap -sn 192.168.0.0/24 (replacing the subnet with the appropriate one for your LAN) to achieve what you're looking for, more ...


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Depending on your hypervisor, and whether or not you have the guest additions installed you may be able to view the configured IP address from the networking configuration area, or possibly the General information page of that VM's properties. Alternatively, most hypervisors support launching a console from the management window. Right click on the VM and ...


-1

Gowenfawr has given the best response Some providers already hide ip address. For instance http://www.tuffmail.com/ or http://servermx.com/ (the one i use) doesn't set your private IP in the header (SMTP or webmail roundcube)


2

To connect networks you need a router. If you like to connect 192.168.2.0/24 and 192.168.3.0/24 use your Windows server because a) it is already connected to both networks b) it has the RRAS (Routing and Remote Access) which turns the server into a router when configured Next, you need to set the IPs of the server as default gateways on the clients. That'd ...


0

The answer depends on where the VPN is "terminating". There are two possibilities. If the VPN is terminated at the PC, e.g. in Windows, then no you cannot (or rather should not) since traffic to the remote network is forced into the VPN on the computer & you would have to define a "split tunnel" to hive off some traffic to go to other devices on the ...


0

With a VPN, you extend your private network over untrusted public network (the Internet). You should then be able to reach other computers with their local IP address, as soon as your client is configured for and if your network topology is compatible : you can be on different subnets for instance.


0

The “intranet” is your local subnet, ie. your servers address/64. IPv6 RFCs strongly discourage networks smaller than /64, so it’s unlikely you’ll encounter any. While there are link-local addresses, they aren’t really relevant here, because you wouldn’t use them. An additional ULA network might be an option, although it poses additional management ...


4

First of all "intranet" is not limited to 192.168. There are 3 private networks defined in RFC-1918: 10.0.0.0/8, 172.16.0.0/12 and 192.168.0.0/16. In IPv6, it is called a Unique local address: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unique_local_address and covered in RFC-4193 -- all addresses matching FC00::/7. Basically, you should be able to search for IPv6 ...


2

Yes, it's the expected behavior. The ping reply is an IP packet in its own right and it isn't somehow specially connected to the packet it's a reply to. IP packets don't form "circuits" for replies to follow, each packet is routed independently. Asymmetric routing is very common on the Internet. For example, with traffic that crosses a country, the ...


1

I think this has more to do with default gateway if your using Linux. As all the interfaces are on the same host any outbound traffic will be via the default gateway and it's associated interface. So what that means is that even though pinged a particular IP address the reply came through the default gateway which means it came from the interface ...


0

Has this anything to do with scobe global/scope link etc? It probably has to do with routing tables and metrics. Try netstat -nr in a command prompt on PCb I expect PCb is convinced that it's Eth2 interface is "nearer" than Eth1 to PCa. The metric shown in the output of netstat is a measure of desirability of a route. It used to be a hop-count but ...


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Do I need to have an ip configured on the bridge interface at all? I don't quite see the reason for it as all it will do is to make to virtual interfaces talk to each other No, a pure bridge only works at Ethernet level – it doesn't even look at the IP header. When you assign an IP address to br0, you're really assigning it to the host OS, which is ...


1

In fact, it's normal you can't ping your PC from the outside : your bbox is in between, but according to https://lafibre.info/bbox-adsl/bbox-sensation-bloque-les-pings-entrants/24/ can't respond to the ping requests... In case you'd like to use ultra vnc you will need to do some natting. In the NAT rules of your box, add a line where you redirect the ...


1

I had the same problem, but, I found with having a lot of devices in my LAN, often a device would take the IP I wanted as static. Try setting the IP at a higher number, I chose 8, had problems, but when I changed it to 250 I was ok. I am guessing the router assigns from lowest to highest? Just a thought :)


1

EDIT I know about DDNS and no-ip etc. As i said i need to set MX records etc, i cannot put a DDNS/no-ip name in as a DNS can i ? Of course you can. There is nothing special about "DDNS/no-ip names", they're standard domain names, they're already in DNS, they hold standard A/AAAA records, just with lower TTL than usual. Besides, MX records accept only ...


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Let me explain what I am using: I have registered to http://www.noip.com/ You can create a free dynamic dns that will resolve your ip address to a domain name if You want to access your pc across the internet. They also have a nice program that keeps refreshing the ip address associated to your domain name if You have a dynamic ip address. This must be ...


-1

The way I have handled dynamic DNS has been through noip.com. They have a free tier where you can specify a subdomain on a few of their own domains and install a tool that will make sure your IP is always up to date with your subdomain. This way you could access your home network with .ddns.net or something similar. You can also pay them about $30/year to ...


1

This is fairly east to do. 1)just browser to http://192.168.x.x, browse to http://127.0.0.1, browse to http://localhost or browse to http:/( OR 2) edit your hosts file (C:\windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts) in notepad and add an entry for 127.0.0.1 "mysite" and then browse to http://mysite


8

You can't: And it's simply, IEEE 802.11 and variants work in Layer 2 and Layer 1 in the OSI Model. To be able to discover another host using UDP datagrams, TCP packets, or even ICMP, you need third-layer connectivity.


0

I do not believe so. You can find it's MAC address but I don't believe you will get the IP address until you have successfully connected.


1

Not sure of an automated way to do this but you can look up MAC addresses to get some information on the device (at least the manufacturer) -- http://www.macvendorlookup.com/


1

An IP is replaced if there is Network Address Translation (NAT) in the mix. The rough outline of it is that the IPs you specified it the question are both in the pool of private IP addresses, so there will be no NAT in the picture (unless you for some weird reason has your router to NAT/Masquerade anyway). This means that if both machines in question have ...


1

Why when reaching a host in the 192.168.2.3 it detects my IP 192.168.1.2? The IP address is never replaced in normal routing. (Only the MAC addresses are.) That's why sites like "What's my IP?" can see your IP despite being behind a dozen routers. What should happen for 192.168.2.3 to detect the router's IP instead (192.168.1.254)? You would have ...


0

Click Start, click Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections, and then click Network Connections. Right-click the network connection you use, and then click Properties. On the General tab (for a local area connection), or the Networking tab (for all other connections), click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Properties. Click Obtain DNS ...


1

There is no way to determine what address the DNS server is located at, but you could try setting your DNS server to 192.168.0.253, as having a forwarding/caching DNS server on the local router is very common. As something is currently not working properly, I'm thinking you're having issues with internal lookups, indicating that there is an internal DNS ...


-1

Why can't you use simple tracert command..the second IP in list will be your public IP. Simplest way to get public IP


0

You haven’t specified what operating system and tools you are using or have access to.  I’ll assume that you’re on a *nix system and can use a shell script.  The example you gave might be easy to handle by simple string manipulation, but realizing that the next address after 42.17.255.255 is 42.18.0.0 is a little tricky.  I think the easiest way to do this ...


0

Whatismyip.com can report your location. What is it? http://www.whatsmyip.org/ip-geo-location/ What is your browser language setting? An IP-range might be sold to another company. If at first that range was located in HK, and now elsewhere, it will take some time to get location databases up to date I guess.


0

Using Debian for your Raspberry Pi https://wiki.debian.org/RaspberryPi you can made a DHCP Server and assign : https://wiki.debian.org/DHCP_Server#Assign_fixed_addresses where are some examples to make your host with fixed address: you can manage your dhcp leases in this path there you can set as never expires. /var/lib/dhcpd.leases an example: lease ...


1

Most DHCP servers work this way, it's just they don't permanently assign the IP to a host. On Linux, using isc-dhcp-server, it's possible to set the lease duration to never expire.


1

I successfully created adhoc network of three devices with following commands. One device is android phone and other two are laptops. on machine 1 (Android): ifconfig wlan0 down iw wlan0 set type ibss ifconfig wlan0 10.0.0.11 up iw wlan0 ibss join MY-SSID 2412 iw wlan0 info iw wlan0 link on machine 2 (Linux): ifconfig wlan0 down iw wlan0 set type ibss ...


0

From your ISP's point of view the router is now the connected device. It will seem always on and the IP address assignment will behave as if you left you pc on all the time in your current setup. If this will give you a stable IP address I cannot say. That depends on other configuration options at the ISP's end. I have seen ISPs that give you a stable ...


0

One option is to have a no-ip account. If you rely on having the same ip address or hostname you can usually set up an account with no-ip for free http://www.noip.com/


2

No. your global Ip will keep on changing until you will ask/buy a static ip for your connection. Dont know about your area, but that is very easily possible by paying very nominal amount.


0

You’ve got two different things going on here. Public static IPs that your ISP issues to you for your services that the outside world needs to be able to find consistently, i.e you web server, vpn gateway, etc… For user IP addresses, these are not typically public static IPs. They're most likely dynamic IPs given out by a DHCP server. To map all this ...


2

In addition to using nmap and other active scanning tools you should also look at your mac address tables on your firealls, routers, and switches. These devices will keep a list of the MAC addresses and IP addresses of all devices that have communicated with in a defined time period. Often this time period can be increased for more detailed results.


0

In regards to finding IP addresses that are already assigned, you can use fping. The command is similar to nmap in that it pings all IP addresses within the subnet and show which ones have replied. Since it is not a linux default command, you will need to install it through yum, YasT, apt-get, etc… usage: fping -gn 192.168.1.0/24 The -g parameter ...


8

…and the previous IT personnel did not leave any information. I feel your pain on this. Inheriting someone else’s unmapped and undocumented network mess is not pleasant. As explained in this answer you could use nmap like this; of course 192.168.0.1/24 is an example and should be changed to the network range assigned to the system by the ISP: nmap -sP ...



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