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if you have the same settings as the router used foir connecting itself to the internet it will work, unless your computer's PPPoE (or whatever your ISP uses for transport) support is broken or missing. you need 4 things to use the internet, a connection to your ISP credentials to log into your ISP an ip address and ip of the gateway the ip address of a ...


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I have seen this identical problem with cable modems before. It seems some of them (particularly older ones) like to "remember" what they are connected to and will only work with that device. If this is the problem then simply power cycling the modem should reestablish the connection with the new device. Unfortunately this means you'll have to have physical ...


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You set your network information to that of a router, which you have removed. You need to clear that all out. If you have a Cable Modem that you're connecting to, allow your machine to configure your IP/Gateway/DNS automatically. Now you should have internet. Your router configuration is for your internal network. Your router is setup to pull everything ...


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devices like routers (including PCs set up as routers) need multiple interfaces by definition (at least one for each network the device will be a part of). Imagine the simple case of a network router that was on two networks, 192.168.0.1 (IF 1) and 10.0.0.1 (IF 2). it would have route rules that would route all traffic to 10.x.y.z out interface 2, and all ...


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I think you are asking how an app decides how to choose. From the program side, it depends on application implementation. If the coder makes IPv6 a higher priority than IPv4, for example, it will first try using getipv6addr(). If that is unconfigured or fails, then it will try using getaddr(), etc. Based on this, the app will send the request through IPv6 ...


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Yes, they are incompatible and they are indeed two different layer-3 protocols. They are incompatible because they are different protocols with a different packet header format. Some significant changes: The address are bigger (IPv4: 32 bit, IPv6: 128 bit) The IPv6 header now has a flow-label field The IPv6 header is kept simple and all extra features are ...


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All that you have described leads me to believe that you do have internet access. There are a couple of more things you can do to troubleshoot your problem. try pinging a public address such as 4.2.2.2 and if you get responses for each ping the problem is likely to be with the DNS address you are using, or the web browser. As an example IE 11 does have its ...


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When you say Ports, I am assuming you're talking about ports that are used in TCP and UDP. In that case, each IP address has ports that run from 1-65,535 for TCP, and 1-65,535 for UDP. As far as IPv6 is concerned, it uses the same ports, you simply need to put square brackets ([]) around your address to differentiate between the address portion and the port ...



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