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6

Mike is correct, iSCSI and SMB/CIFS operate at two different layers of abstraction. You can think of SMB/CIFS as exporting a file system that other machines can access. The directory structure, security metadata, and such is already there. Client machines can read and write files to this file system, but that is the extent of their access. With iSCSI, ...


4

An iSCSI target is presented to a host as a local disk. It is not suitable for sharing the same volume across multiple computers. You'll want SAMBA or NFS for this.


3

No need to reflash your firmware or pay for a software solution, especially if you need to boot only one computer. The solution is: gPXE + iSCSI initiator plus some cooking. Most of what you need to do is explained here: http://www.etherboot.org/wiki/sanboot This works for Windows XP to 7 and for Server OSes too.


3

Right. You seem to be slightly confused here, perhaps. Samba (CIFS) and iSCSI are two very different protocols. Samba presents a file-level storage target, and iSCSI presents block storage, y'know, a disk that you then put a filesystem on. With regard to overhead, CIFS is probably somewhat higher, given there's a layer of locking and other file-level ...


3

Ok, not sure what OS this is using, but Amazon have just announced AWS Storage Gateway which does something simular to what i am thinking above... it creates a Virtual Machine on your network, which creates iSCSI volumes. it uses local storage for a "cache" it writes data back to S3 for snapshots and for backup... Interesting idea, not free though. but ...


2

Creating an ISCSI Target enable the storage server and iscsi target server if necessary svcadm enable stmf svcadm enable -r svc:/network/iscsi/target:default create a volume if necessary (sparse 10T in example) zfs create -V 10T -s zones/iscsi create a logical unit sbdadm create-lu /dev/zvol/rdsk/zones/iscsi Add a view on it (GUID is output by ...


2

Not unless they both mount it read only. If you want to share, then you will need to use a file sharing protocol such as SMB/CIFS or NFS.


2

I would say that even if you could create such a huge volume, this would be a disaster waiting to happen no matter how you create it (think chkdisk times in case something goes wrong). If your software needs everything under one drive letter, maybe you can get away with mounting sub-volumes as directories under a master volume (and not as a separate drive ...


2

What you are trying to do is not really possible with Windows 7 OEM licensing. You will want to purchase Windows 8 VLKs under an Open License Agreement, which will provide you downgrade rights to Windows 7. This is what we did at a place I worked recently. When you login to your License Portal, you will see you have a MAK for Win 7. On Microsoft's site, you ...


2

In my experience iSCSI is the lowest-overhead of the bunch, an jumbo-frames do end up counting. I have seen iSCSI saturate a GigE connection using the LIO-Target iSCSI framework and a ramdisk as the target. That thing flew. The older version of the Linux iSCSI stack did have some performance issues in it, and couldn't use a ramdisk for full-bore throughput. ...


2

Have you run disk IO benchmarks on both the server and client? Unless the disk subsystems are capable of the throughput you require, they will of course be the bottleneck rather than the network.


2

I had the same issues with a Buffalo Terastation III 4GB iSCSI SAN device connected to MS Windows Server 2003. THE PROBLEM After a reboot, the operating system will not reactivate the dynamic disks associated with the iSCSI device. And any network shares associated with the dynamic disk would be lost (unshared). iSCSI initiator shows the device connected ...


2

It will work just fine but for multiple computers you would need NFS/SAMBA. Since you never used it I would set it up so you can see what its all about.


2

They are used for different purposes: NFS is for serving files from a server to many clients, taking care of conflicts etc. iSCSI is used when you not directly attach the storage for the computing element, but connect over a (dedicated) network. Only one computer can use an iSCSI drive at a time. iSCSI's allows storage to be dynamically allocated for the ...


2

This Nabble thread indicates this could be a consequence of an old IET kernel module included in Ubuntu's kernel. Check the thread closely and see if your symptoms align. This might make sense, since there seems to be a huge difference in versions between Karmic's official iscsitarget package and the version you're attempting to backport. If so, the fix ...


2

File Level VS block level Block Level (iscsi) You can format a remote Volume with your Local operating systems file system. Lets say you want to have a Volume for Apple Time-machine and you wanted this as an Apple Journalized file system. or you wanted a remote Filesystem formated as NTFS. to format a disk you need to have block access to the disk. SMB ...


2

The names of entries in /dev are determined by udev. Find some distinguishing characteristic such as the serial number, then add rules like the following: KERNEL=="sd*", ATTR{vendor}=="Yoyodine", ENV{ID_SERIAL}=="123-abc", NAME=="sdd" KERNEL=="sd*", ATTR{vendor}=="Yoyodine", ENV{ID_SERIAL}=="123-def", NAME=="sde" On Debian, you would add these in a file ...


2

It really will depend on the kind of VMs you will be running. Are the applications write heavy or read heavy? Read heavy systems will be ok on a RAID-5, while RAID-10 (1+0) will be much faster on writes. The parity calculation with raid 5 takes a beating to RAID-5. RAID-10 also has the disadvantage of using half of your storage for redundancy. RAID-5 ...


1

WHS 1 no, WHS2 (aka Vail) yes. The old WHS can initiate just fine but Drive Extender won't acknowledge the disks so you can't add them to the storage pool. It seems like a slightly redundant setup though...


1

The Main reason the DE does not work with iSCSI is because DE comes up BEFORE the iscsi stack while booting. WHS2 should support the iscsi stack. What i suggest is a Cheap HBA(IntelPro1000T or MT) to handle the iscsi stack. then install WHS to the iscsi target. :)


1

In the meantime I found a solution on my own. One has to make the process wait for the iSCSI device to appear. By default this makes /etc/rc.local inappropriate but wait, there's process forking! This is my complete /etc/rc.local and it works nice. When the graphical login manager appears it still takes 1-2 seconds for the filesystem to be mounted, so don't ...


1

how large of a risk am I taking with my backed up data in relation to silent corruption? ZFS takes data integrity very seriously and my personal experience with ZFS send/receive is that it's robust. I would suggest you implement your send/receive in the most straight forward manner and use scrubbing to make sure that any corruption is detected. I ...


1

You really need a switch (ideally two, for redundancy) between your storage array and your hosts. Otherwise you're limited to the number of ports on your array.


1

Does your drive officially support multiple client connections via iscsi ?, multiple connections from one client is a whole different ball game to multiple connections from several, if not this wont work and will cause data corruption if you try. You need a storage device that supports clustering. The only work around I know of is to use the Microsoft iscsi ...


1

If the NIC has ToE (TCP Offload Engine), it greatly reduces the amount of processing power required by the CPU. I would say that at anything > 1Gbps speed it is almost mandatory. The difference between Fibre Channel and iSCSI is that iSCSI runs over IP, which is a lossy protocol (i.e. packets are not guaranteed to arrive in the correct order, or even at ...



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