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13

You can't disable journaling on NTFS. That being said, the benefits are dubious these days. While writes are limited, the myths of write endurance existed from the first generation of SSDs that appeared in the enterprise market. I find it hard to believe that the same is still true ten years later. For example, Corsair's blog posted this test. ...


6

Because journalling is not a magic wand. Coping with power outages and system crashes during I/O transactions doesn't become a non-issue just because a journal of transactions is kept. The part-completed transactions that were in progress when the system crashed/the power went out don't get magically rolled forward or rolled back by themselves. The ...


6

Ok... you've just given me a long list of conflicting stories that make you sound like a paranoid non-geek... who is trying to understand things without bothering to do research on the subject. low-level formatting removes EVERYTHING from the disk. There is NO way that there would even be a concept of journal entries on your hard drive... as there would ...


4

There is a way to completely delete (not just disable) USN journal on Windows 7: fsutil usn deletejournal /d c: According to Microsoft Technet, Deleting the change journal impacts the File Replication service (FRS) and the Indexing Service, because it would require these services to perform a complete (and time-consuming) scan of the volume. This in ...


3

These "Journals" are not actually readable journals as you'd expect. It's a process that is done for you behind the scenes to record changes to files if the disk unexpectedly turns off (power failure for example). Although you cannot read these journals, you can easily repair journaled volumes. You can find further information from these links: Mac OS X: ...


3

It depends on the hard drive or thumb drive. They can be reformatted with different filing systems, and there's no guarantee that they have been formatted with a journaling system. If you want to make sure your hard drive or thumb drive has a journaling file system, then you should reformat it with one.


3

NTFS is not a real journaling file system. It only tries to be, but doesn't go all the way. HFS+, ZFS and btrfs are examples for real journaling file systems. External hard drives and thumb drives are mostly formatted for compatibility, as they are likely to be used for transferring data between lots of different computers, and the computers may have ...


2

First of all, what version of OS X are you in? Second, just a clarification: I assume the reason you need to disable journaling is that Ubuntu doesn't support reading and/or writing to HFS+ Journaled volumes? Or, wait, what in the world.... diskutil disableJournal takes a path to a volume, not to an arbitrary folder. So, if your home folder is located on ...


2

This is quite a reasonable question, but, alas, it does not have a simple answer. If I understand you right, what you are saying is: by using a VM with its own journaling file system on top of a host with its own journaling file system, aren't we actually doing our job twice? Couldn't we simply use only one journaling system (most reasonably, the hosts's) ...


2

Journalling comes in different levels, which have different trade-offs. NTFS journals only meta-data, not the actual file contents itself. That means that you can corrupt single files while writing, but you can't corrupt the other files in the same directory. Similarly, when a crash does happen, the exact type of jornalling determines how much time is ...


2

Journal allows to bring filesystem quickly to consistent state after unclean shutdown but not when corruption occurs due to hardware failure or system error. In such case a full check is required.


2

I wouldn't call it "safe", and neither does the linked article: "Just make sure you realize that without a journal your filesystem is more susceptible to corruption and data loss if it is not cleanly unmounted (if the power goes out, for example)." You won't experience data loss in normal use, but if the system ever goes down uncleanly (i.e., the battery ...


2

The article you mention states it clearly: "Just make sure you realize that without a journal your filesystem is more susceptible to corruption and data loss if it is not cleanly unmounted (if the power goes out, for example)." This does not mean that you will experience data loss. Only if something goes wrong and your partitions are not cleanly unmounted, ...


1

Better use some filesystem that is suported. Reiser4 was never really completed, and has been abandoned for some years now.


1

The USN journal's purpose is to provide a complete list of filesystem changes to various userspace programs like virus scanners or file indexers (e.g. "Everything"). You can safely delete this journal, using fsutil on Windows, or rm on Linux (ntfs-3g): fsutil usn deletejournal C: It's a good idea to recreate it later though: fsutil usn createjournal m=0 ...


1

Before you go disabling journals, keep in mind that once disabled, they are purged. From MSJ: A Change Journal can be disabled on a given volume, preventing the system from logging file and directory changes. By default, an NTFS volume will have its Change Journal disabled. Some application must explicitly activate the journal. Also note that any ...


1

I think nobody tells you to disable journal on SSDs while using NTFS because nobody knows better. It's extremely easy to find bad advice on Windows forums and the same is happening with Ubuntu... So use a grain of salt when using a forum for those. The numbers of writes on a SSD until it dies is lower than a regular HD. So, any time you write to it, its ...


1

Open up and administrator prompt (search Command Prompt in Start menu, right click on option, Run as Administrator) then paste this block in: fsutil usn deletejournal /d C: (You'll have to paste using right click, by the way.) You can do this with every drive letter.


1

Technically, you can disable the USN change journal. The change doesn't look like it is persistence and at best looks like a liability for bugs. Checking MSDN . .. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa363798(v=VS.85).aspx To delete a change journal, use the FSCTL_DELETE_USN_JOURNAL control code. When you use this operation, it walks through all ...


1

No, the AirPort Extreme Base Station does not support journaling. It only supports regular HFS+.


1

This post describes a similar method, and also explains how to get TRIM working with ext4.



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