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39

One important thing to note before we start is that Microsoft is the single source for the Windows operating system, and "Microsoft Windows" might be seen as a single product, but technically it consists of multiple layers of software, working together transparently from the user's point of view. In the Linux world, however, there are multiple software ...


24

Here's what you could do to remap session locking from default Ctrl+Alt+L (tested with KDE4.3) : Go to "System Settings" (KDE menu). Choose "Keyboard & mouse" (on "General" tab). Choose "Global Keyboard Shortcuts" on the left. Choose "Run Command Interface" from "KDE component" dropdown list. Choose "Lock session". Select "Custom". Click on "None" ...


24

Both GTK and Qt are toolkits for building graphical interfaces. Each UI toolkit provides its own functions for programs to create widgets (buttons, textboxes...) and comes in the form of libraries that the graphical program links against. A program written for GNOME will use GTK (libgdk and libgtk), while KDE programs use Qt (libQtCore and libQtGui), ...


19

Easiest definition - Gnome and KDE are to Explorer, as Linux is to Windows! I cannot recommend any over any others though. It is not a entirely different world, but it is a different world! Edit - Some people have downvoted this due to the definition, so I will explain some more. Windows is the operating system, Explorer is the name of the "shell" that ...


19

This is done in Screen Edges KDE Control Module. Fire up the Kickoff menu, type "edge" there and open the search result. Then click on the top-left corner of the display picture and select "No Action". Press OK You can also start this application from the terminal: kcmshell4 kwinscreenedges


18

X11 is a network protocol. It encodes things such as graphic primitives, images, pointer motion, and key presses. Xorg is an X server. It implements X11 and provides an interface to keyboards, mice, and video cards. GTK+ is a widget toolkit. It provides things such as buttons, scrollbars, edit boxes, etc. Metacity and Compiz are window managers. They ...


17

Ubuntu has a built-in tool for changing the type of system you are running. $ sudo tasksel This tool lets you check the box next to the type of system you want (Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu, Ubuntu Server) and then confirm to have the tool re-configure your system, removing and adding packages as needed.


16

Gnome: Kde: Fluxbox: These are desktop environments - they are the graphical interface to the system, and normally come with a suite of applications designed with them.


13

I would imagine it redundant to name it something under KDE4. The behaviour I ascribe to Gnome-Do ( I haven't really used it, I'm just going by what I see on Gnome-Do's website ) is part of Kde's implicit functionality now. Just start typing in the search field that's on the menu, or start typing in the run dialogue ( Default shortcut is Alt+F2 ) For an ...


13

Have a look at your installed applications. If a lot of them start with K - you're on KDE. If a lot of them start with G, you're on Gnome. Seriously. (Not very accurate if you have both installed though). If you go to the About page of your computers settings panel, that should give you some clues. Alternatively, look around on Google Images for ...


13

Quick way #1: if you have a "System" menu entry on the top line, and there's an item in the menu that says "About Gnome", you're probably running Gnome. Quick way #2: ps -ef | grep gnome


13

I'll show you a short selection and description of the most common desktop environments. Unity Unity is developed by Canonical. It has a bar at the top which contains the clock at the right and a button on the left which will bring up a search/menu window. There's a launcher on the left of the screen. The default theme colors are purple/orange/brown. ...


12

Yakuake. http://yakuake.kde.org/


11

This one's easy. Go to System Settings > Input Actions. In the selection area, do right click > New Global Shortcut > Command/URL. Make sure you give it a name, a shortcut, a command, and tick the Enabled box. Click Apply and you're done. Coincidentally, though, the the "Examples" group should already contain an action named "Run Console," ...


11

Memorising hexcodes is madness. Use the compose key instead. It lets you combine characters in a mnemonic way. This is a feature of X, not just KDE, thus works everywhere. Some examples: Compose, v, C   →   Č Compose, ´, E   →   É Compose, _, u   →   ū ...


11

notify-send 'why hello there' notify-send is part of the package libnotify-tools. perl -MDesktop::Notify -e'Desktop::Notify->new->create(body => q{why hello there})->show' Desktop::Notify is available on CPAN.


10

$ sudo apt-get remove kubuntu-kde4-desktop $ sudo apt-get autoremove will remove all the dependant packages it pulled in. Alteratively, if you use aptitude like so $ sudo aptitude remove kubuntu-kde4-desktop it'll remove all the dependant packages for you automatically. Personally I prefer the manual control of apt-get, and it'll tell you ...


10

ssh -X is not the same as startx. SSH is a program used for connecting to another computer with a shell. X is the graphical display program. SSH can be used as an interactive command shell and can also be used to forward ports. ssh -X forwards the local X display's port to the remote computer and usually sets up the remote environment so that if you start ...


9

I've tested the best tools I've found with GNOME under Linux Mint installed; GNOME under Linux Mint Live USB; MATE under Linux Mint; LXDE under Lubuntu; JWM under Puppy Linux (JWM is not a desktop environment but a stacking window manager). My results: (so-so) env | grep DESKTOP_SESSION= DESKTOP_SESSION=gnome DESKTOP_SESSION=gnome ...


9

First of all, Nautilus is Gnome, not KDE. The browser for KDE is Konqueror or Dolphin. That said, the basic commands that you would need to know to be productive in the terminal are... Navigating Use cd folder to navigate to the specified folder. Use ls -l to show the contents of the current folder (including the permissions), and ls -l folder to list the ...


9

As an alternative: kdialog --passivepopup 'why hello there' 5 5 is the number of seconds it will last. Run kdialog --help for other options, like title.


8

Ok, let's try to make it short and not get into an (ugly) troll. GNOME is the most common environment currently (let it be known: it's not mine ;)). It uses the Gtk graphical set (for Gimp ToolKit, since it was created for Gimp initially). The main idea behind GNOME is close to the idea behind UNIX systems generally: one program = one function. Each program ...


8

For KDE4: Gnome-Do = KRunner (built-in, hit Alt-F2) For KDE3: Gnome-Do = Katapult


7

There are few disadvantages one is that KDE apps depend on a fair number of packages and thus occupies additional space a little bit of memory. And second is that you have to tweak the look of KDE applications. To do this try qgtkstyle. It's a theme called to integrate KDE applications into Gnome.


7

I think the simplest way to do this is to remove ubuntu-desktop and install kubuntu-desktop. sudo apt-get install kubuntu-desktop sudo apt-get --purge remove ubuntu-desktop You can also just uninstall gnome-desktop-environment instead of ubuntu-desktop.


7

OpenSUSE is very KDE-centric.


7

At a terminal run sudo apt-get install kubuntu-desktop to install the KDE desktop environment. You will be prompted to choose your default desktop choice, but will also have the option to select at login which environment to use. If you decide later you don't want it just run sudo apt-get remove kubuntu-desktop from the terminal to remove it


7

In the KDE Control Center, a.k.a. System Settings, there is an "Autostart" module that will allow you to set programs to run when you log in to KDE. On my computer it's on the "Advanced" tab, but I think the layout varies somewhat from distro to distro. If you want to mess with it at a lower level, the files to run on startup go in ~/.kde4/Autostart.


7

KDE's version of that command is kde-open. However, there's also a universal version that should work in any desktop environment called xdg-open. Get in the habit of using that and you won't need to figure out a new command if you decide to switch to something else besides KDE later.



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