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7

In my experience, you have to use it or lose it. The best programmers I know are the 'total geeks' who love programming. They write code of all sorts every day. That C# client might pay the bills, but when they go home they are writing expert systems or contributing to open source projects. There is some research that indicates it takes 10 years to ...


6

This is gonna sound really naive, but what about @gmail if it's for personal use ? Or a small application like CintaNotes (notes, taggable, searchable) ... maybe OneNote, although that seems overly complicated for this sort of thing. Or something like Code Warehouse. Anyways, do post if you find a better solution. I'd be interestd to hear about it, ...


4

I would not worry so much about forgetting what you've learned. I think Richard Feynman said too many people memorize useless facts that could just as easily be looked up in a book. Concentrate on recognizing problems and knowing where to look up the information on how to solve it. When you start your programming career, problems aren't going to pose ...


4

I use Google Mail for this. The global search combined with the ability to tag things is very powerful for things you know you read but cannot remember where.


4

ResophNotes looks pretty good, although I just started using it recently myself.


3

I've tried to use SharePoint discussions connected to Outlook w/o a lot of success. Maybe the 2010 versions of Outlook/SharePoint will make this better... You might also find When In Doubt, Make It Public interesting reading.


3

I strongly recommend Tiddlywiki. While the other answers have good apps/webapps for your purpose, they pose a few issues - Tiddlywiki and its feature sets resolves those though: Portable - Tiddlywiki is a standalone web compatible system, move the directory over, launch it in a browser, and you are good to go again. Did I just mention Tiddlywiki runs in a ...


2

As someone who has been using email since the 1970s, I've tried just about all the usual routes. However, I've settled quasi-permanently into this scenario: I use mail filters to scan all my old mail files and pull out mails of interest into basic categories - as COPIES, not moves! I save raw in-box postings as-was, but move them, with the date they end as ...


2

Ah, If only there were Git for my brains, I could say I haven't lost my mind, its backed up somewhere. True life alas is not so yet. However, while you will not recall the method to solve every problem you can work on today, feel good with the idea that your mind is not like your computer harddisk. The way it remembers things is (in some ways) more like ...


2

Having finished my CS degree a while ago, I have indeed forgotten much of the details of what I learnt there. I don't really think that's too big a deal though. At uni/college, you're learning core skills in a specific area and you're also learning how to go about learning those skills. The point is not to teach you everything thing you will need to know ...


2

What you should remember isn't the problem solutions, but how you solved them. That's the real trick; the problems are different almost every single time. Just keep solving difficult problems. (What I find useful is to introduce wickedly difficult problems that lie in wait for me for months, then strike without warning on a three day weekend. Keeps me in ...


2

Evernote is a great solution for taking notes, and the search feature in the application version of Evernote works fine for this purpose. Not so sure about the web version but it should have this feature as well. (Evernote's free with ad-support and 20 MB upload every month, although you could pay for no-ads and 500MB upload/month. The ads do not obstruct ...


2

Simplenote has this capability too.


2

I use one of two techniques (linux solution): Search your package manager - it contains descriptions for thousands of apps & will tell you if they are installed or not. If I'm pretty sure I have it installed, but can't remember it, I open a terminal and type: man -k <whatever I'm interested in> to return a list of programs (with manual pages) ...


2

A couple of years ago I created a text file called software.txt. If I ever find an application that solves a particular problem or I think is neat, I make a note of it there. It's small, portable, and doesn't require any additional software to read it. Then after I've wiped my PC and am trying to find that really cool bandwidth monitor that I can't ...


2

You should check out MediaWiki. It is a wikipedia like web application that will allow you to not only have multiple users access the site, but also allows external editors to manage the content of your wiki site. http://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/MediaWiki MediaWiki 1.5 and later allows you to edit any resource using any external tool. This is accomplished ...


2

Use OneNote, copy-paste of articles , will usually preserve the formatting, and it also adds a helpful link to the original website should you want to visit the source again. It also had a useful screenshot tool that sends the image straight to OneNote. It's free and it works with other MS Office tools. If you create a OneDrive account your onenote syncs ...


2

@RMorrisey, I think you would really get a lot out of Microsoft One Note. It has all the features you listed above and more. http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/onenote-help/demo-what-is-onenote-HA010168634.aspx


2

You might try evernote. It uploads all you notes online, and i believe on your pc. There are plenty of extras that go along with it as well. Give it a shot and see what you think. It's free too!


1

Honestly, if you are moderately comfortable coding in PHP, the best option is to just write yourself a quick application. It's fun and you also learn from doing this. However, if you're already advanced and can't be bothered with such low-level nonsense or you can't code PHP at all then there are some good open-source alternatives for you such as phpMyFAQ ...


1

There are some great free CMS packages that can be customized to facilitate the type of site you are looking for. The most popular free packages are Joomla Drupal WordPress Moodle Out of the box Moodle is most focused on an education oriented site, so may require less customization than the others. I personally recommend Drupal for maximum flexibility. ...


1

Use gmail or google docs to store the list, now you can upload a few files to docs too, if you have webspace you can wget the software and link it too your document with description or just link it to the source , using google docs has the added advantage of sharing/ collaboration.


1

I love Microsoft OneNote, it is awesome and has a number of features that make it great...it does not however, have the instant search feature you are looking for, but it offers image text support, and when you type a query and press enter, the search results are there instantaneously.


1

I'd recommend SharePoint as being a great store of this information for several reasons: SharePoint provides an indexed search over content including email and attachments in email. If your SharePoint environment is exposed to the web you can now access your knowledge store from any web browser. SharePoint is a very configurable environment so you can ...


1

Aside first: I'd recommend XOBNI as a tool for Outlook-searches. Thee free version, however, is limited to searching for contacts, IIRC. Personally, I've been searching for good solutiom for personal info/knowledge-management for years. Tree-based concepts did not work for me, because I have too many links between info. Example: I started off with ...


1

Decided on using either Alfresco or Liferay for document management. Check it out if you haven't already.



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