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The generic name for both methods is Cascading, although the second one is sometimes more accurately called bridging. The router connected to the Internet is called the main router, while the other one is called the secondary router. Cascading or bridging can be used to extend the network's range and/or to reduce the number of devices communicating with each ...


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To make sure we are on the same page, and to clear up some possible confusion, let's define some things. In the case of a consumer class router -- what most people call a "router" -- is actually several things in one box. A network router: in charge of routing traffic between networks. Most of the time this is between the WAN port (typically The Internet), ...


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It sounds like from that description that you need a switch which would be plugged into the patch port in your room and then plugged into both computers. An alternative would be to get WiFi but on the Thinkpad you could either get a USB WiFi adapter or create a bridged connection between the two computers. Hope this helped


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Your internal "LAN" (through the gigabit switch) will communicate at gigabit speed, yes. Any device requests through the 10/100 switch will be limited to 10/100 - i.e. all Internet "requests". Your "Internet" traffic will be further limited by your Internet speed (c. 45mbps).


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Theoretically you could, Hub Circuits can be replicated with only a Breadboard, but isn't a best practice (...) we always watch the Star Topology or in advanced networks Fully Connected Topology but to have all in rule you always should use the right Networking Hardware or your selected Network Topology will have a critical impact. If you are doing this ...


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Depending on the structure of your network, EtherApe is a graphical network monitor, but it's more for active monitoring, not logging to a file. You could use tcpdump to capture data over a long period and then use Wireshark to analyse that data and get visual representations. This all really depends on your network structure though, is all of your network ...


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Since it takes less time to transmit a packet of a given length, gigabit will have lower latency than 100 mbps.


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the total time of spending in a node is: delay(node) = d(process) + d(queue) + d(transmission) + d(propagation) the one you are asking is about d(transmission). it is calculated by: d(transmission) = L/R which L is the length of the packet and R is the bandwidth. you see the more the R be the less is the d(transmission). I hope it'll be helpful!


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It will need two things: Switches that support VLANs and VLAN trunking. The router must have more than one ethernet port. You have to create two VLANs and one Trunk on each switch : Room B: VLAN A - Ports that connect internal users VLAN B - Port to Wireless access point Trunk - Port to the only ethernet cable going to Room A Room A: VLAN A - Ports ...



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