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You have a couple choices. 1. Get a dual-WAN router. They can be configured to use one of the Internet connections as primary and the other as failover. If the primary goes down it'll automatically route traffic to the secondary until the primary comes back up. 2. Connect the second connection to your network with DHCP turned off on it's router (you may ...


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If you are going to mix Windows and Linux and use it occasionally it'd probably be best to go with Samba. You don't need to install additional software on either system. Just make sure all systems have shares configured and you should be able to access them from all systems. You could go for NFS, but on Windows it's a bit tricky to set up ...


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The IP alone is not enough to determine if it is on the same network. You need to use the subnet mask as well. An IP address is made up of four 8-bit octets; an octet is a sequence of 8 binary bits. Each bit therefore can be either a 0 or a 1, so each octet can represent 2^8 different values, which is 256 (0-255). Since there are four of these octets, there ...


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You need to know the subnet mask. The subnet mask tells you which bits of the address represent the subnet, and which bits represent the host within the subnet. If you subnet is a /24 (255.255.255.0), then any address whose first three octets match would be in the same subnet. In your example, if your subnet mask is a /26 or longer (255.255.255.192 or ...


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txtechhelp's comments helped me figure it out. When I disabled Windows Firewall completely, I was able to successfully access Jira on my LAN. So, clearly, it was a Windows firewall issue. I discovered that I had mistakenly opened UDP port 8100 instead of TCP. Once I changed that, it works fine with Firewall on.


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I believe you would like a Local Area Network (same subnet) without having to change wifi password all the time. IE. If a person walk form building A to build B for meetings, he or she would not need to change the SSID and wifi password setting. Pls see if suggestions below works: [Suggestion] "Router" on building A and "Wireless Access Point (AP)" on ...


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SRC=192.168.1.1 DST=224.0.0.1 LEN=32 TOS=0x00 PREC=0x00 TTL=1 ID=0 DF PROTO=2 SRC=192.168.1.1 - looks like a NAT router address (the other common one being 192.168.1.254) DST=224.0.0.1 - IP multicast 'all hosts' address PROTO=2 - IGMP - Internet Group Management Protocol So this is mostly likely an IGMP Query packet sent by your local router to all ...


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As people commented you would be better to add the rule as an exception and restart the service: firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-port=80/tcp systemctl restart firewalld.service


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If I understand things correctly: Both computer network card and cable modem supports 1 Gbps speed. You have tried with two different drivers for the network card. When testing the cable on your Mac it achieves a 1 Gbps connection. It could be that the cable is of poor quality and just barely manages the speed, making it so that the Mac accepts for 1 Gbps ...


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Yes, they're all IEEE EUI-48's (EUI == Extended Unique Identifier), and the IEEE Registration Authority manages the address space to guarantee uniqueness. The first 24 bits is an Organizationally Unique Identifier (OUI). Each OUI is assigned to a particular company by the IEEE. That company can then make 2^24 unique MAC addresses with that OUI as the prefix. ...


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I don't quite follow your diagram, but assuming you're talking about local networking, and not two seperate WAN uplinks, I suggest get decent switches that support OSPF, and let them do the hard work. OSPF correctly configured will also occasionally exceed the bandwidth of a single link depending on your network topology (consider 4 nodes as 2 pairs, each ...


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You have not provided nearly enough information to go on - particularly how the "disconnect" works. Making huge assumptions there are a few ways to deal with this - Ensure the more reliable route is less preferred and set the faster but less reliable connection up in such a way that the interface (or at least its route) disappears when its not ...


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Yes, you might be able to make an ad hoc connection between the desktop and laptop without a crossover cable. Many modern Ethernet ports have Auto MDI-X, which obviates the need for a crossover cable. Only one of the two Ethernet ports needs to have the Auto MDI-X feature. Just be sure that the Ethernet ports are set to auto-negotiate, rather than a fixed ...


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As long as at least one of the ethernet ports are Gigabit capable they should autonegotiate as GIGE does autonegotiation. (Otherwise you can put them into a switch, but I guess thats what you are trying to avoid).


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You are over-complicating your network setup. You should only ever have one DHCP server for such a small network. You should, also, have one range of IPs for all your devices to be able to communicate together without special routes that allow your devices to talk to each other across different subnets. A suggested solution to your network would be: Plan ...


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You can create an adhoc network and for this work you have these 2 choices: Install a Wifi Hotspot app on one of them You can install a wifi hotspot app on one of them and then create a hotspot and connect from the other. There are plenty of these softwares but I myself prefer to use Connectify which has the best compatibility and is best among the other ...


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I'm dumb. dnsmasq was not set up to listen on 192.168.1.38 so I added listen-address=192.168.1.38 listen-address=127.0.0.1 to my dnsmasq.conf file so it works now.


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Your router supports uPNP, which allows programs like deluge to automatically ask it to forward ports while the program is running.


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It's inside the function of network connections. Your client (deluge) perform a request to internet hosts and "publish" port 6881 for incoming requests. Your firewall blocks the incoming connections ([UFW BLOCK]) for your pc but the requests from external hosts to your port 6881 is normal. There is nothing strange in this. Moreover, some incoming connection ...



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