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If you know the server IP, you can enter via command line like this: TmForever.exe /lan /join=192.168.100.110 For me, it worked!


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You need to setup "port forwarding" on your router that connects the 192.168.0.* subnet to the 172.16.13.* subnet If you need to connect to multiple PCs you will need to distinguish them by a different ports, since you only have 1 IP available. It would look like this: PC1 192.168.1.2:80 -> 172.16.13.1:81 PC2 192.168.1.2:80 -> 172.16.13.1:82 etc. ...


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There is no problem with this network layout - except that it makes your network topology a bit confusing. Unless you explicitly need PC3 to be behind another NAT and PC2 to be on both networks - there isn't any practical benefit from this. It'd be easier to have Router (192.168.0.10) connected as switch instead. Judging by your route output syntax, you are ...


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There is a setting in the registry that will set the Ethernet connection as metered. The setting is HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\NetworkList\DefaultMediaCost Setting it to 2 will make the connection metered. (taken from tenforums.com)


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I have experienced this issue and none of the suggestions around on the web helped. Mostly two things are suggested that actually do not make much sense, but it worked for someone at somepoint (even if none of them solved my problem): In this specific order, go to the adapter settings, first disable the bridge, then remove it (can be found in multiple ...


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A Windows computer can only be joined to one Active Directory domain. However, this does not limit you to one AD domain's resources. Since your other NIC is connected to the other AD domain's network, those resources might still be available to you. If there is a trust relationship between the two AD domains, those resources might be immediately available ...


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Your NIC maybe under Unknown Devices or Other Devices, but it still has the same information. In the device manager under the details of the NIC there is a unique hardware identifier. 2 sets of 4 hex digits one for the vendor and one for the device id. You can then google the results. Here is one place to lookup the information. web site.


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This is correct, nothing is wrong. With a typical SoHo NAT router setup, machines on the WAN side of the device cannot ping machines on the LAN side of the device. So machines on the Internet can't ping PC1 because they're on the WAN side of the modem (which is also a router) and PC1 is on the LAN side. That's how small NAT routers work (like both your ...


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On PC1 you have to configure an static route. On Windows 7 for example it will be: Open the command prompt with Administrative rights going to the Start button, then type cmd on the search combo box. Right click on the cmd icon and click, Run as administrator Issue the command route add <destination subnet> mask <destination subnet mask> ...


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You should remove the gateway from N2 machines, then they will not access Internet but all will be in one LAN segment. Put all machines in one LAN segment, for example in 192.168.10.xxx and do not set the gateway on N2 machines. It will works for sure.


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If your computer on N1 only has one NIC (network interface card), buy and install another one. Plug the new NIC into the N2 switch and assign the NIC an address on the N2 network (or let it get one automatically if you have DHCP set up on N2).


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Whoever set up that hostel's network made the mistake of using the RFC 3927 IPv4 Link-Local subnet (169.254.0.0/16) where it should have used an RFC 1918 private subnet (192.168.0.0/16, 172.16.0.0/12, 10.0.0.0/8) as the NAT private subnet. This violates the "1.6 Alternate Use Prohibition" provision of RFC 3927. So it's no surprise that some clients have ...



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