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Whoever set up that hostel's network made the mistake of using the RFC 3927 IPv4 Link-Local subnet (169.254.0.0/16) where it should have used an RFC 1918 private subnet (192.168.0.0/16, 172.16.0.0/12, 10.0.0.0/8) as the NAT private subnet. This violates the "1.6 Alternate Use Prohibition" provision of RFC 3927. So it's no surprise that some clients have ...


0

169.254.x.x is unroutable, it's designed to not pass a router, it can only stay within its own subnet. It can be routed, but it oughtn't to be. From RFC 5735 This is the "link local" block. As described in RFC3927, it is allocated for communication between hosts on a single link. Hosts obtain these addresses by auto-configuration, such ...


1

It's definitely possible, in fact it's the basis of how routing (routers) work. Through a variety of ways - static routes configured into a local router, updates via a protocol called RIP (Routing Information Protocol) which is essentially routers sharing their routing info, and if all else fails, Default Gateways (DG). DGs are where traffic gets sent when ...


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192.168.1.0/24 cannot talk directly to 10.0.0.0/24 If a device is only on 192.168.1.0/24 then the only way it can communicate with 10.0.0.0/24 is if some other device on 192.168.1.0/24 will help out by routing the traffic. A reason for that restriction is that, in your example, the subnets don't overlap. A 192.168.0.0/16 can communicate with a ...


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So your device is an ADSL router, not a modem. It can be used only to connect to ADSL networks, so there is no way to use it any other cases. Also it can't be used as a simple switch. You need to ask your ISP (internet service provider) to learn what type device you need to connect to the internet.


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You must set your router as an Access Point, from its control panel. Set the wireless on the TP-LINK router to broadcast the same SSID as the ISP modem, but on a different channel, to reduce interference. For 2.4Ghz, a hop of five channels is a good bet for no interference (ignoring other networks around): 1, 6, 11; 2, 7, (12 EU/JP); 3, 8, (13 EU/JP); 4, ...


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I came here for an answer and I found it - check both ends of the tester, which I normally would have done, but the cable spanned a house, through the attic, and behind a safe. I tested the "bad" cable with the same tester as illustrated, and it tested OK - except that I was looking at only the "controller" side (big part), the real info is at the other end, ...


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I followed ssh process for passwordless login first http://www.tecmint.com/ssh-passwordless-login-using-ssh-keygen-in-5-easy-steps/ For scripts and text files the following works for me just fine To transfer data from local host to remote host. cat localfile | ssh <user>@<ip> "cat > <path>/<remotefile>" To transfer data from ...


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The colors have no effect on the electrical signals. They are only meant to help human installers. The cable will effectively communicate the required electrical signals. The blind (literally: no optical sight) computers will not notice any difference. The colors are from the plastic insulation over individual wires within the cable, and don't affect how ...


3

The problem with arbitrary wiring is that the wires in the cable are organized as twisted pairs. The intent is that one signal is driven differentially onto the two wires of a given pair, and most of the bad electromagnetic effects will cancel out. Each pair is deisgned to have a specific characteristic impedance, and the twisting of different pairs is ...


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Yes. The reinstall worked. I formatted my C: Drive (System Drive), then I installed the drivers in this order- Chipset Driver Display Driver WLAN/LAN (Ethernet Drivers) Others (Touchpad, audio etc. I don't really install these) My PC can now detect the Raspberry Pi over LAN...



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