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124

The concern isn't really when it's in the fridge but when you take it out. The cold laptop/parts will pull the water out of the air AFTER it's taken out of the fridge, even if it was in a plastic bag. Think of a glass of water, it doesn't 'sweat' when it's in the fridge but you take it out on a hot day and it does. The other concern is, depending on the ...


80

As you suspect, it is not a very good idea. The cooler air inside the fridge can quickly condense the vapor normally found in the air, producing little droplets of water on the coolest parts (such as the motherboard). Even if you find it effective, it may result in damage to your computer. I simply suggest you not do it. Read USGS website for more ...


30

As others already said, you're killing your laptop with the condensation. Better solutions: You say the laptop is still under warranty: Use the warranty. Bottled air to clean the fans without opening the laptop /voiding the warranty. Laptop cooling pad. The ones with larger fans make less noise.


22

I have a similar overheating problem with my MacBook. The fan was always spinning away. My solution was to freeze an ice pack (I think that's what they're called). Wrap it in a tea towel (to absorb moisture) and sit my MacBook on that. After a few minutes or so, the fan stopped and my MacBook was happily cooled.


11

The condensation that could form when you remove the laptop from the fridge would make me worry enough to not to do it at all. I have seen people that have drilled holes in the body for cooling and other crazy things like that in the past. Maybe it's time to upgrade the machine? EDIT from comments: Stop using Google Chrome for Mac. It seems to consume far ...


8

As the previous posters wrote, condensation is a major danger for the laptop, so putting it in the fridge could possibly be the end of it. The overheating issue most probably is due to the fact that dust, fluff, animal/human hair and other materials have clogged the laptop's metal grille between the fan and the air vent. Additionally, the thermal paste ...


6

LinusTechTips has done a video about it: PC Build in a Fridge - Does it Work? Fridge is not designed for computer cooling, CPU/GPU cooler with thermal paste is the way to go. Since it's a MacBook Air/Pro, I know it's not easy to open it and everything. How safe is to keep a laptop in the fridge? About the laptop itself it will be fine, components are ...


6

Don't do it unless you don't mind losing the laptop (and the data on it). Typically, people live in spaces where the air has some humidity. Air will hold some amount of water vapor depending on the temperature (more if warmer). A typical indoor space might be carrying, for instance, half the humidity that it can accommodate at room temperature. When you ...


5

Putting your computer inside the fridge isn't necessarily a problem by itself, but it is no solution either. But first, I do have a few comments beyond what I already read in other answers. Putting the warm laptop in a plastic bag or sleeve before placing it into the fridge is a bad idea. Warm air holds lots of moisture; as it cools, you will see ...


4

It may also be how you are handling your laptop. Make sure when you use it that you are giving the fan enough room to work to its full potential. Do not block the fan or put your laptop on a soft surface (like a bed). This does not allow for proper ventilation. Also, since you mentioned summer, try to keep your laptop out of direct sunlight; this may cause ...


3

Your SATA controller on your laptop is part of the motherboard. Yes, your new SSD will work, but at SATA-II speeds (3 gbps). I have run SSDs in SATA-II ports before and although you do not get the full SATA-III experience (6 gbps), they are still faster and more reliable than traditional hard drives.


2

Nope, you can't. typically intel graphics is on the processor die (or on older systems the chipset). As such replacing intel integrated graphics means replacing the processor, and typically these are restricted by what the bios supports (which is a whole different question), or simply soldered in place. You might be able to pick up a fairly low cost ...


2

Don't put it in a fridge. Condensation will kill it eventually. If you really can't upgrade the machine, use an airconditioner. Put the laptop near the vent, and it will do what you need. The AC will cool the machines, and condensation will be much less of a problem. You need to monitor that, but I guess it won't be like in a fridge.


2

Put a small object such as a small smooth stone under one end. This simple and basically free trick will allow more air to circulate underneath and if you feel how hot the base can get you know this will hope a little bit. Personally however I've graduated to the fan shown by Peter. They cost about $10-15 and I've bought one for both home and work. they ...


1

Your laptop is likely set to mirror display. Therefore it will try to use either the monitor's native resolution or laptop's resolution. If they aren't the same, which is often the case, one of them will be blurry. The solution is to "extend" one display to the other. Which you can set in display settings. After that, you may still need to change the ...


1

I've used successfully the fridge to cool down the laptop for couple of weeks and I didn't have much problems, however it may have some longstanding negative effects on the hardware which may decrease lifespan of your laptop, as well as overheating your laptop, so both things are bad, so it's up to you how you want your laptop to 'die' (from the cold or hot)....


1

Look at the operating requirements on Apple's site: Apple.com For the current generation MacBook Pro, the minimum operating temperature is listed as 50 degrees Fahrenheit (~10 ºC). Operating temperature: 50 °F to 95 °F (10 ° to 35 °C) Pretty much any consumer electronics will have such specifications published. Low ...


1

When in doubt visit the Manufacturer's Website. Their website lists the laptop as having the capabilities of 2 M.2 SSDs and one HDD. The website does get a little bit convoluted though, however it seems to be that there are TWO M.2 slots along with a SATA3 slot. The M.2 slots are fed by the PCIe lanes instead of SATA3 lanes, so in this situation you'd be ...


1

To capture a trace of the CPU usage. Install the WPT from Win10 SDK, open a cmd.exe as admin and run this command: xperf -on latency -stackwalk profile -buffersize 2048 -MaxFile 1024 -FileMode Circular && timeout -1 && xperf -d C:\highCPUUsage.etl Now do the action that triggers the CPU usage of the system process. When you see the issue, ...


1

Looking at the Intel ARK website's compare feature you can get this table: Name i5-6200U i7-4700HQ ►# of Cores 2 4 ►# of Threads 4 8 ►Processor Base Frequency 2.3 GHz 2.4 GHz ►Max Turbo Frequency 2.8 GHz 3.4 GHz ►TDP 15 W 47 W ►...



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