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36

CentOS is essentially RedHat Enterprise with the stuff they can't include (i.e. RedHat specific stuff that isn't licensed for free redistribution) removed. CentOS tends to be closer to RH Enterprise as it is based fairly directly on it, where Fedora tends to be a bit more leading-edge.


20

Ubuntu is a good choice. One of the features about it that I really like is what I call the "desktop swap" feature. It's basically like an alt + tab of sorts, but instead of going through applications, you have 4 (I think) desktops to play with. So you can have a dev desktop, a gaming desktop, a correspondence desktop (email, doc writing, etc.). At least ...


19

Create a file named ~/.ssh/config and put this in there: Host h User christopher HostName my.domain.top Now you only have to type ssh h and it does the same thing! You can also use a wildcard: Host * User christopher


14

If you're used to Ubuntu, then use Ubuntu. Also, any distribution that's modern and up-to-date are pretty standard in what they offer. The big thing that sets them apart however, are the package managers. Red Hat based distros use RPM packages and Yum-based repositories, and Debian/Ubuntu based distros use deb packages and apt. Personally, I prefer Debian ...


14

Becoming root for one session: In Ubuntu you can become root for the remainder of the session by typing: # old-school method sudo su # new hotness, comes highly recommended sudo -i More information and related reading. Permanently enabling the root account: Further, you may permanently enable the root account by typing: sudo passwd root and ...


12

You might try this article from Novell. If you are the owner of the system, then you know which Linux is installed and running. This article will help you to understand how to determine which Linux distribution is installed. You can incorporate this into your application to detect Linux distro.


12

You might want to read the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard; it's a useful reference. Your home directory is where most of that should go. Pretend you're not the sysadmin; pretend you're yet another person with an account on the system. Within your home directory, e.g. /home/pufferfish, you can do whatever you want. /home/pufferfish/bin, ...


12

Check out these sites: http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/ http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/7233


12

What you are searching for is called ttylinux. Major Components Kernel Glibc Iptables Dropbear (scp, ssh, sshd) GPM Bash Busybox E2fsprogs


12

Since you mention specifically for a server, I would suggest the following go into the decision process: Stable vs. Bleeding Edge Releases There are a lot of folks that love "Bleeding edge" releases (such as ArchLinux or Fedora). What that means, however, is that they are essentially the continual Beta Testers for Linux releases. Of course, there can ...


11

You could create a second user, c, with the same UID. From here: The UID is the actual information that the operating system uses to identify the user; usernames are provided merely as a convenience for humans. If two users are assigned the same UID , UNIX views them as the same user, even if they have different usernames and passwords. Two users with ...


11

If you are looking for Red Hat Enterprise Linux . thats not free. Fedora is a Linux-based operating system that showcases the latest in free and open source software. Fedora is always free for anyone to use, modify, and distribute. (http://fedoraproject.org/) The Fedora Project is a Red Hat sponsored and community supported open source project. Its goal is ...


11

I think two main difference is Package management Default Window Manager (Gnome, KDE, XFCE) Just pointing to these two big difference will somewhat change your behaviour in doing task. For example you could easily install a package on Ubuntu using apt but not so simple when using rpm. Having a difference in Window Manager can also change how you interact ...


10

Why not just use ubuntu itself? There's even a utility in the Administration section to create the USB setup for you from an iso file. Make sure you set an area for your persistent data though.


9

Wikipedia has a good comparison table of Linux distributions. Also, DistroWatch has an overview of the top ten distributions.


9

In Debian: /etc/debian_version In Ubuntu: lsb_release -a or /etc/debian_version In Redhat: cat /etc/redhat-release In Fedora: cat /etc/fedora-release


9

Ubuntu is the best given the amount of searchable Ubuntu content on the internet. If Google is your guru till you get one, then Ubuntu is the way to go. Having said that, i strongly advise using VirtualBox - so that you can test any of the distributions you want to inside your base distro. Since you want to learn command line operations, using ...


9

As others already noted, bare sudo apt-get install package will install latest available version, replacing the older one if needed. But with some software (among which is Python) the situation is somewhat different. Some major, very- and incompatibly-different versions get their own packages. For instance, Python 2.6, Python 2.7, Python 3.1 all live in ...


8

If you are wanting to try Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) check out CentOS. It's exactly the same as RHEL but with copyrighted RedHat logos removed. Basically it boils down to: RHEL = CentOS = Oracle Unbreakable Linux - Server OS, with stable packages and 'certified' to run certain proprietary enterprise software. Has ancient version of most packages (by ...


8

Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) is an enterprise-class Linux distro whose goal is long-term API/ABI stability. Fedora Linux (Fedora) is a developer-class Linux distro whose goal is to test and showcase new technologies. Every few years a new version of RHEL comes out, containing stabilized forms of the technologies previously used in Fedora.


8

well, they both run the same apps- the difference is in the desktop environment. However UIwise, i found that KDE is more 'windows like' than gnome. 'Basic Sql Server 2005 database administration' and 'Organizing millions of files' i'm unsure about with both though, the latter cause i don't have millions of files


8

It's very simple to run Linux over Windows with VirtualBox. See this tutorial on installing Ubuntu over Windows XP (7 should be similar) with VirtualBox. It worked great for me, installing Ubuntu 9.10 just over the last weekend. Everything works great so far.


8

Well, you should start by mastering Linux From Scratch.


8

The Sugar desktop is plain and simple, used for the OLPC program.


8

Ubuntu is by far the best choice especially if you are a Windows user. You can also try the LiveCD before you install, for compatibility with your hardware. Once you have it installed, these resources will be useful to lookup. The Linux Documentation Project has lots of HOWTOs and guides The Ubuntu guide is a good place for references Once you get a ...


7

These days ubuntu is definatly the way to go for starting with linux, it has the best support community for new users, and some of the best hardware support (ubuntu aren't too fussy about including stuff that other distros wouldn't consider free enough) You don't mention how much ram you have, but the machine doesn't sound that powerful, so I'd consider ...


7

Just to record it here, there is also a pink fluffy theme for KDE 4.


7

If the GUI is the only problem, but you like the system itself, then install Kubuntu. It's basically Ubuntu with a different user interface, including Dolphin instead of Nautilus.


7

There are plenty of tutorials about this subject in the web. Google the same string you used in your question's title. Distros based on another distro means that any can take the work made by others (that's the aim of free/libre software) and modify and adapt it for their needs as long as they publish back their work with the same license as the original so ...



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