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2

There are a few problems with your setup. First, you are using public, routable addresses as if they were private addresses. For instance, 192.138.14.1 is Chapters Capital Management, LLC in NJ, while 192.138.4.1 is the University of London's (UK) Computing Center. And so on. Please go back to using addresses in the range 192.168.0.0/16. Second, your ...


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You have a filesystem inside a logical volume inside volume group which encompasses all of your physical volume inside your now-64GiB block device. What you have done through GParted was extend the physical volume to fill the block device, and the volume group automatically fills the physical volume, but you did not extend the logical volume. As a result, ...


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You've temporarily redefined where your system looks to find important commands. What you want is this: PATH=/usr/local/texlive/2015/bin/x86_64-linux:$PATH That redefines $PATH as the textlive directory AND what $PATH was before. Re-open your terminal and the re-assignment will be lost, so everything is back to normal. To update the $PATH permanently, ...


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Currently trying this one out, but maybe something like this: for dir in `find . -type d -mtime +30`; do find $dir -type f -mtime -30 -quit -o -print; done


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I doubt many folks have done this so far so I guess you will have to live with hints, not facts. In your shoes, I would go to single user mode (runlevel 1), create a clone node of /dev/null (mknod /dev/nihil c 1 3; chmod 666 /dev/nihil), delete /dev/null, create a fifo called /dev/null and write a script that reads that fifo and writes the log. Then switch ...


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From the man page: If no value is supplied for who, each permission bit spec- ified in perm, for which the corresponding bit in the file mode creation mask (see umask(2)) is clear, is set. Otherwise, the mode bits represented by the specified who and perm values are set. So if you don't specify who you want to update the permissions on it falls back to ...


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This is defined by umask. It sets the default for creating and change of permissions of files. To see the umask by default in a easy way issue the command umask -S . For example the result: u=rwx,g=rx,o=rx means that for user applies all, for group only read and execute, and the same for others. To change it issue umask on this way: umask x@y where: x ...


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The umask (by default 0022) is the reason the chmod +w change only the user attribute $ chmod -v 444 a mode of ‘a’ retained as 0444 (r--r--r--) $ umask 000 $ chmod -v +w a mode of ‘a’ changed from 0444 (r--r--r--) to 0666 (rw-rw-rw-) $ chmod -v +x a mode of ‘a’ changed from 0666 (rw-rw-rw-) to 0777 (rwxrwxrwx)


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The service telegram is running attached to 127.0.0.1. It is the loopback address of your system and it that can only be reached from the same device. You need to modify the configuration of the service to make it attach to 0.0.0.0 or to your IP address.


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A noauto entry in fstab is one which, for different reasons, you do not want to have mounted automatically, at boot and with the mount -a command. It is mounted by specifying the device or the mount point explicitly, like in sudo mount /dev/sdb1 or sudo mount /home/MyName/MyMountPoint The cases in which you do not necessarily wish a device to be ...


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In short: You can't. A host key isn't a thing you can exploit to get into a server - it's just a cryptographic hash of the server's public key. It's public, so there's nothing to break. SSH transmits this to clients so they can ensure they're talking to the right server. More information here.


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The quick answer is: you can't because host keys are for making your client sure it's talking to the box you want it to. It does not authenticate/identify you. The other answer is: just think about it that (almost) anybody can get that host key you have already got. If it should be enough to login, then ssh would be the worst remote login solution ever. And ...



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