Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

2

Why are they not working According to the ArchWiki’s article that you mentioned: X server gets keycodes from the input device and converts them to the state and keysym. state is the bitmask of the X modifiers (Ctrl/Shift/etc). keysym is (according to /usr/include/X11/keysymdef.h) the integer that identify characters or functions associated with each ...


2

This answer explains what needs to be done, but the specifics of how depend on your distribution, your setup and purpose, and which tools you choose to parse the data: What you are looking for is the Auditd daemon within Linux. From the manpage auditd(8): auditd is the userspace component to the Linux Auditing System. It's responsible for writing audit ...


2

-n prevents echoing a new-line at the end. $' is a Bash command that causes backslash-escaped characters in the string to be replaced as specified by the ANSI C standard. More info \e = ESCape. \e]0; is a command to set the window's title, in this case to set it to "Hello World" \a is "alert" (dings the system bell) More info on *nix Echo here


2

In XTerm (or anything that emulates it), it sets the window's title to "Hello World". \e] is the ASNI escape code for an "operating system command" (OSC), which essentially means it's up to the operating system to define what it means; in XTerm, <OSC>0;text<bel> is used to set the window title. See wikipedia, and Edward Moy's XTerm sequence list ...


1

Have you tried Sysstat in Linux? It is a package of system monitoring tools. One that will fit you will be called sat. You can downloaded it from here Otherwise, you can use your package manager to install. Use one of the command depends on your Linux distribution. sudo yum install sysstat or sudo apt-get install sysstat For Windows, I can't point ...


1

Have a look at What are the methods available to get the CPU usage in Linux Command line? in which I explain how to use sar to get cpu usage etc. In order to get sar you will need the package sysstat as @passionate_tester mentions above. For more general monitoring you could use a tool like Xymon which will track disk space usage, CPU load, system uptime, ...


1

You try to run a 32-bit executable in a 64-bit system. That's not a problem, but you need some packages on your system to be able to do that. Add the 32-bit architecture to the package library: sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386 Update the package cache: sudo apt-get update And install the needed packages: sudo apt-get install libc6:i386 ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible