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19

I would say that any laptop battery should last much longer than a year, even in a reduced capacity. You should check out this page for some data and tips on how to charge your battery and how long you can expect it to last. From the summary: Avoid frequent full discharges because this puts additional strain on the battery. Several partial discharges ...


8

Typically, the batteries are connected to each other via spot welded tabs. You could solder wires to the batteries you found, but it might not fit afterwards. Make sure you use a wire with enough current carrying capacity (i.e. 14 AWG). Theses batteries do get hot and pass a lot of current during peak loads. You can also build yourself a spot welder rather ...


7

Beware: Soldering Li-ion cells can be somewhat dangerous, as when they get hot such as during soldering they can tend to explode.


3

Unless you have experience with electronics and soldering I wouldn't risk it. Batteries put together incorrectly have an unhealty disposition to extreme exothermic reactions (i.e. blow up) which can be quite fatal if you are close.


3

There was a related study that tested cycles at different temperatures. One finding was that the cells in the cold cycle tests (0°C) lost capacity, but when they were brought back to 20°C the capacity recovered. The report points out that when the cells were maintained at a low state-of-charge, the capacity loss was less severe but those cells did not ...


2

A really good li-ion battery that is fresh, does not change or advantage from 3 full charge/discharge cycles. Most of the battery experts would say that is true. There are exceptions to this rule :-) Many of the china batteries , really do actually change in the capacity held, for the in Spec voltage range they operate in, when cycled 2-3 times. My ...


2

What you should not do is leave a Li-Ion battery sitting in an uncharged state for long periods of time. Li-Ion batteries do not do well if left uncharged for long periods of time (though they also do not do well if kept constantly at full charge either). Also, you generally should not remove the battery from a laptop (except to service one or the ...


2

Only if you know the power consumption of the laptop. The rate at which it uses the charge in the cells. And presumably, as the number of cells changes, the output voltage is regulated by electronics in the laptop, or there are series/parallel connections so the voltage for the circuity stays the same. Circuitry likes that. You would need to know what ...


1

Most manufacturers will print the production date onto their batteries, so just check that. Of course, an unscrupulous manufacturer (or seller) could falsify the sticker, so the only real protection is an honest seller, plus a good warranty (e.g. "at least x mAh per charge for the first 300 charges"), plus a seller who actually stands by their warranty :-). ...


1

I recall reading a review, which I cannot find at the moment that suggests that the killer for Li Ion batteries is heat. Which I suspect is one of the reasons for removing when running on wall power. The worst thing that can be done is to close the lid, expect it to suspend to RAM, and shove it in your laptop back, when Suspend to RAM decides NOT to ...



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