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19

For future reference, here is how I finally proceeded, with a few comments on the various issues or pitfalls encountered: 1. Boot the machine with a Linux live system First step was to boot the machine containing the disk to image, using a Linux live system. NOTE: My first idea was to use an Ubuntu Live USB disk, but the machine did not support ...


13

To put it simply : Between FAT and FAT32, just choose FAT32. Between NTFS and FAT32, If you use the drive only in Windows, use NTFS. In any other case, use FAT32. Why NTFS for Windows? NTFS(New Technology File System) was introduced by windows and has been supported since the early versions of Windows. So it has become sort of a Windows thing. ...


6

Although you can achieve this with practically any disto by doing a full install to a USB drive, the problem, especially when you want everything encrypted, is that paging to disk is incredibly slow - and default HD installs do a lot of paging. This route will also thrash away at the I/O on your flash drive greatly reducing it's lifespan. I have yet to find ...


6

You can try using TestDisk to recover the partition, but unfourtunately, using DD is about the easiest way to destroy a disk (thats why its called DD) irrevocably, since it overwrites existing data. you can find TestDisk, and PhotoRec on a number of system rescue disks. I've used this one before: http://www.ubuntu-rescue-remix.org/ TestDisk recovers ...


4

Windows formats USB drives as NTFS by default, FAT is really old, what type of file system you want to go with depends on your need. NTFS Supports files larger than 4 gb Can run Windows 8 live Unetbootin does not support NTFS and refuses to use drives that are NTFS formatted. FAT32 Files must be smaller than 4 gb Linux Live works Please know that ...


4

Windows does not allow you to see anything but the first partition on USB flash drives. This is a well known issue and Microsoft doesn't seem to be considering it a major issue. There is a firmware hack for some brands that will tell Windows the drive is not flash media, however doing this may cause performance/reliability problems. It's a bummer.


3

One approach is to use a couple of handy technologies: VirtualBox, and the ntfsprogs package. Recent versions of VirtualBox allow you to create VHD hard disk files, while ntfsprogs provides the ntfsclone utility. As its name suggests, ntfsclone clones NTFS filesystems, and I believe that it does it at the filesystem level, skipping over unused disk blocks. ...


3

The problem is that flash-drives are quite limited in speed as compared to spinning hard-drives and SSDs. This is because by their nature, they are not meant for high-performance usage and so use simpler, more basic mechanisms than a comparable SSD or hard-drive (which is also why they are much cheaper). You can (currently) expect typical read speeds ...


3

Hm... the same method worked fine for me... I'll document what I did step by step, so you can check what you did differently. I booted up from a LiveCD (though this shouldn't make any difference) and chose the try option on boot. I went into the Installation wizard (Ubiquity) and clicked through the Language, Keyboard, and Time Zone prompts. At the ...


3

While most computers nowadays have USB3, you will really notice a speed differenc if you're limited to USB2 speeds. Boot and load times are primarily the affected areas, so if you can live with that, this won't really be an issue. There is also the generally increased wear and tear that comes with a portable device, so take the posibility of data theft and ...


2

Sure its possible (assuming no drive encryption) but I know of no one trying to make it work. Installing an application is nothing special, really. Its the obfuscation from the user that makes it appear magic. Basically, what would need to be done: Capture all file writes Capture all Registry changes Linux can read an write to NTFS, so you could ...


2

checkout this link https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/How_to_create_and_use_Live_USB follow the dd command it worked for me To write the ISO file directly to the disk, run: su -c "dd if=/Users/me/Downloads/Fedora-17-x86_64-DVD.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=8M" Or, if you are running an Ubuntu-based distribution sudo dd if=/Users/me/Downloads/Fedora-17-x86_64-DVD.iso ...


2

You need to change the boot mode to legacy. Then the DVD & USB boot modes will be available to choose from in the boot loader.


2

Throw away the DVD and delete the files you copied from it. Download a new ISO from fedora. Let Universal USB Installer do all the work. You just need to point it at your ISO file and your USB stick. http://fedoraproject.org/get-fedora http://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/.


2

You can't simply edit the bootloader, add entries for Win7 partitions on your USB HDD and expect it to work. With the exception of Win8 Enterprise's Windows To Go feature, Windows does not allow installation to or booting from USB drives without jumping through hoops (requires the use of WAIK, ImageX, Sysprep and so on). You haven't described the actual ...


2

It can be done, but is not necessary. Ubuntu installs in an windows partition, and uses a file for persistant storage. You can use the same partition for Windows files storage.


2

You should reconsider the overall question and do as Thiago M suggests. A Live CD needs to be configured to boot and pass off the boot sequence in a manner that differs from USB thumb drives. There is a similar question about migrating between different thumb drives on ...


2

If "the necessary resources" are hardware related, such as not enough ram, or cpu power. I'm not sure how that would work. You could perhaps install a linux distro onto a usb drive with Virtualbox installed and boot the computer using that OS and initializing the virtualization through that Virtualbox. It will likely be slow, but could be an alternative ...


2

Your premise is flawed, most USB keys are not faster than HDDs. SSDs are fast because they use an array of memory cells which can be accessed in parallel. However if you want to do this for portability reasons then looky here: http://hak5.org/episodes/haktip-4


2

Some usb sticks don't ever seem to be bootable. In most cases though, the hp drive format tool, which there's a mirror of here seems to do the trick. HP created it for formatting their own drives, but it nearly always seems to work. If that tool dosen't work, chances are the drive's not bootable, even if the bootable flag is flipped for some reason. After ...


2

They usually mount tmpfs to /tmp, which is an in-memory filesystem (like a ramdisk on steroids). So, it is as secure as your memory is.


2

Since it wasn't mentioned on GNOME website that on which distro GNOME 3.4 live cd is based, trying random distros didn't worked, however, GNOME 3.0 live cd was launched based on both OpenSUSE and Fedora, so trying Fedora 16 Desktop as distro in Universal USB Installer worked for GNOME 3.4 live cd. But GNOME website could have listed distro type on website.


1

I don't think there's any way to lock the files on an ordinary thumbdrive (you might be able to use a CDFS partition to lock the files in Windows, but this won't work for other OSes), though there are specialized thumbdrives that can provide hardware-based write-protection for specified files/directories. However, to make it bootable again, you just need to ...


1

I would suggest to use unetbootin to burn the image to an USB key, it automatically takes care of properly set up everything. As you can see, you can alternatively select a distribution (including Kaspersky) from the top dropdown box, or manually indicate an existing .iso file to burn on the USB key.


1

(I know this is an old post, but maybe this will at least help others.) Do you really need to be able to create the image under Linux? I think you are trying to backup Windows hard drives to VHD. I don't think that Linux file systems can be encapsulated in a VHD container. A free SysInternals utility called Disk2vhd will create VHDs of the currently ...


1

How to make a USB-key bootable with BartPE Or Boot Multiple ISO from USB (MultiBoot USB) | USB Pen Drive Linux


1

You can use ISO image. Just attach it to the VM and boot from it.


1

When your data is overwritten, as opposed to "only" deleted, I'm afraid your data is permanently gone. Your only chance is to deliver your HDD to a professional data recovery company, that may be able to reconstruct some of it. This is usually really expensive, however, so you'll have to consider how important those data are/were to you.


1

In theory yes. You could copy the contents of the virtual drive to a real drive and boot from it. However, the VM is installed on virtual hardware, so when you boot it on a real, physical system, it will need to detect the new hardware and install all the drivers for it. This can be easier said than done since it’s not just the video card or hard-drive that ...


1

Answer to the first part: It's a good idea to backup the image first. Add 500MB of zeroes to the end of the image casper-rw. Make sure you use >> (append) and not > (overwrite). dd if=/dev/zero bs=1M count=500 >> casper-rw Resize the filesystem to cover the entire image file resize2fs casper-rw That should be it.



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