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20

You can run less +F filename in order to view file in tail -f fashion. You can press Shift+F while viewing file in less to switch to forwarding mode, and Ctrl+C to leave this mode.


5

From less -help: F Forward forever; like "tail -f". so presumably less +F /var/log/messages


3

Nicolai's answer is probably closest to what you asked for, but have you thought about using tmux? In my tmux sessions, I like to tail -f logs, then simply enter tmux's copy mode to search up and down exactly like searching in less, then exit copy mode to find my tail -f still going. Create a tmux session: tmux Tail the log file and the last 1000 lines ...


2

The trick is to add CustomLog directives inside each VirtualHost in your Apache config files. For example: <VirtualHost *:80> ServerName www.site1.com DocumentRoot /var/www/www.site1.com/htdocs CustomLog /var/log/apache/www.site1.com-access.log combined ErrorLog /var/log/apache/www.site1.com-error.log </VirtualHost> <VirtualHost ...


2

In short NO. From this log you only can retrieve the info that the log shows (obviously). But if you have root access to the server (i can supose this), you can do some search to try to find the user. All depends on your system configuration. For example you can check auth log (if shutdown was launched with sudo you will find the command and the user ...


1

Example log: *EXTRA Dir -1 y:\Open Client Files\sample\ 0 f:\server\blah\somefolder\ 6 f:\server\blah\somefolder\ The numbers (-1, 0, 6, etc.) are the number of files in that folder. -1 is used for "Extra Dir" entries, and 0 is used for "New Dir" entries (and other folder without any files in them). ...


1

Yes it doesn't seem to be logged anywhere for you. @tutuDajuju has a good solution so I thought I'd port it to bash (and remove the dependence on using gnome, this should work regardless of desktop environment) for those that are interested. If you have this running in the background and pipe it to a log file you will have your log. #!/bin/bash #prints ...


1

I'd look to see when the system was restarted or powered up. Search the Event Viewer under System Log for EventID 6009 (one of the events that hits when a system is first started up) and then review the cameras around that time. Should be obvious if anyone tampered with the case. You can also refer to the manuf info about bios intrusion detection. Some ...



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