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153

Manpage sections. Common UNIX command that can be used by all users. e.g. ls(1) Unix and C system calls e.g. mmap(2) C library routines for C programs e.g. system(3) Special files e.g. sudoers(4) System file formats e.g. lmhosts(5) Games e.g. fortune(6) Miscellaneous e.g. regex(7) System administration commands that is run by root only e.g. iwconfig(8) ...


64

An excerpt from man man: The table below shows the section numbers of the manual followed by the types of pages they contain. 1 Executable programs or shell commands 2 System calls (functions provided by the kernel) 3 Library calls (functions within program libraries) 4 Special files (usually found in /dev) 5 File formats and ...


25

The number refers to the man page section the command or C function is in. So you could access the man page of mount(8) by doing the command: man 8 mount Or of ftok(2) like such: man 2 ftok


23

The numbers refer to the manpage section the manpage belongs to: 1 Executable programs or shell commands 2 System calls (functions provided by the kernel) 3 Library calls (functions within program libraries) 4 Special files (usually found in /dev) 5 File formats and conventions eg /etc/passwd 6 Games 7 Miscellaneous ...


20

Install the manpages-dev and manpages-posix-dev (thanks ChristopheD) packages. You should be able to find them in synaptic, or type apt-get install manpages-dev apt-get install manpages-posix-dev at the command line.


18

kill just sends a signal to the given process. The -9 tells it which signal to send. Different numbers correspond to different common signals. SIGINT, for example, is 2, so to send a process the SIGINT signal issue the command $ kill -2 <pid> The manpage here specifies: The default signal for kill is TERM. The manpage also provides a ...


13

The numbers signify what section the page belongs to, there are 8: 1 - General commands 2 - System calls 3 - C library functions 4 - Special files (usually devices, those found in /dev) and drivers 5 - File formats and conventions 6 - Games and screensavers 7 - Miscellanea 8 - System administration commands and daemons for example, if you wanted to know ...


12

They are section numbers of the traditional Unix manual pages. Your question has already been answered on Unix and Linux Stack Exchange a year ago, What do the numbers in a man page mean?.


6

There are different sections of the man pages: 1 General commands 2 System calls 3 C library functions 4 Special files (usually devices, those found in /dev) and drivers 5 File formats and conventions 6 Games and screensavers 7 Miscellanea 8 System administration commands and daemons git(1) would be explaining the usage of the command, ...


5

Long reading of manuals for man, less, groff and grotty finally gave me answer Highlighting by default is made using backspace sequences: c\bc => bold c, _\bc => underlined c. But if output as is using cat as pager just outputs plain c in both cases. Also blank lines are squeezed, so to do all this, pager must be set to ul | cat -s. Pager can be set in ...


5

The default signal is TERM which allows the program being killed to catch it and do some cleanup before exiting. A program can ignore it, too, if it's written that way. Specifying -9 or KILL as the signal does not allow the program to catch it, do any cleanup or ignore it. It should only be used as a last resort. To see the list of numbers and signal names ...


4

It doesn't come bundled with the default man pages, to install it: yum install man-pages


4

Section 5 of the man pages is for file formats and conventions. You can see portage(5) by executing man 5 portage. This will tell you how to properly structure a portage file. You can see documentation for the man page sections in man 7 man.


4

If you're looking at the man page when you see these, they are the "section" in which to look. By default, man pulls up the first entry it finds for a given query. However, this can cause issues where you have an entry for crontab, the command, and crontab, the system file (the command is used to edit the file). By specifying the section you want, you can ...


4

Man pages don't hyperlink. Are you possibly thinking of GNU info pages, which do hyperlink? Either way, underlining/hyperlinking is up to discretion of the writer, which may or man not be consistent. Remember that there are several versions of UNIX,and each 'manual editorial policy' as such may be different.


4

Set LANG to C or to en_US. This will be affect of all programs unless you add an alias for man that sets the variable accordingly. alias man='LANG=C man' [edit: I tested it, LC_MESSAGES changed the error message language, but not the manpage language]


3

These are section numbers. If you want to read section 2 of mount then run: man 2 mount Some man pages have multiple sections.


3

These are the man section numbers. Sections and Examples for linux man pages: 1 - Programs or shell commands - cp, rm, dd and ps. 2 - System calls - fork, exec, ioctl and poll. 3 - Library calls - printf, malloc, pthread_* calls, cos, sin, tan etc. 4 - devices e.g. null (/dev/null), port, random, lp. 5 - File formats - users, groups, hosts, ...


3

In manpages, underline is merely for emphasis.


3

The numbers in parentheses ( and ) refer to different sections of "the manual". If you do man man, it will tell you which numbers correspond to which section of "the manual". Each operating system may use its own layout for man page sections. Here is the section layout of my Ubuntu system. 1 Executable programs or shell commands 2 System calls ...


3

Man pages are split up by sections. This allows you to specifically look up an entry for portage in, say, "File Formats and Conventions" (section 5), by selecting the appropriate section from the man command line. man [section] entry man portage; # pull up first occurrence of portage, any section. man 5 portage; # pull up occurrence of ...


3

I am using Ubuntu Linux. Kill commands basically sends signal to process to end it. To simplify complex behavioral expectations of everyday computing kill command has various options along with it. As explained above with all the kill numbers options corresponding to its definition. I would like to add few lines to it. 1) SIGHUP 2) SIGINT 3) SIGQUIT ...


2

On a ubuntu system they are in the packages manpages-posix-dev (headers) manpages-dev (functions)


2

You may find glibc-doc package useful as well. From http://packages.ubuntu.com/jaunty/glibc-doc: Contains The GNU C Library Reference manual in info and html format as well as the man pages for libpthread functions and the complete GNU C Library ChangeLog.


2

man man ... PAGER A program to use for interactively delivering man's output to the screen. If not set, `more -s' is used. See more(1). Which means the pager is regulated by PAGER env. variable, Thus just define PAGER as setenv PAGER cat and enjoy.


2

My guess is that what you've installed has added some extra directories to your MANPATH and likely nuked some standard directories from MANPATH. First run man --path to determine which directories man will search for man pages. Here's what I see: $ man --path /opt/local/share/man:/usr/local/share/man:/usr/local/mysql/man:/usr/share/man:/usr/X11/man If ...


2

That means that some of those man pages are missing. You should re-install the package that contains them. Since you didn't say what OS or distribution, I can't give any further guidance. man perlinfo works for me. Edit: Try: sudo apt-get --reinstall install perl-doc


2

It depends on where your man pages are but I think the -M flag or setting MANPATH would be your friends here. alias gnuman='MANPATH=/path/to/gnu/man/root man' or alias gnuman='man -M /path/to/gnu/man/root'


2

Assuming your man pager is less, you can search for regexes by using /. For example, to search for examples in man find, type /^examples. You can use page-up and page-down and other usual navigation keys to move around.


2

The "security reason" is that between the time that find is enumerating the files and deleting them, it may be possible for an attacker to modify one component of a file's path such that it becomes a symlink to an unexpected directory, resulting in your deleting a file of the same name from an unexpected directory. For example, you could end up deleting ...



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