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I think you mean convert MBR to GPT. 1. Convert MBR to GPT using Diskpart command This method you have to backup all your data and delete all partitions and volumes. Then use the DISKPART command Open command prompt and type in DISKPART and press Enter Then type in list disk (Note down the number of disk you want to convert to GPT) Then type in ...


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Yes, second (non-bootable) harddrive can be formatted to GPT and recognized by Windows Server 2012 R2 regardless of firmware/motherboard support of GPT and UEFI. This applies to Windows 7 and Windows 8 as well. Please note: both disk C: and hidden system reserved partition with BCD hive must reside on MBR-formatted disk less than 2TB, because both of them ...


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Boot from a Windows 7 Install/Repair disk. Even if it can't detect your Windows installation, you should still be able to get to command prompt to fix the MBR. Once you're there, use DiskPart to activate the volume you want to repair. Type the following (line return = enter. Be sure to replace the "X"): diskpart List vol select vol X (Where X is the ...


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I've used Ubuntu to repair many MBR issues with Windows drives. Boot from a USB with Ubuntu installed: http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/create-a-usb-stick-on-windows Install Boot-Repair: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair On the Main Options screen of the Boot-Repair GUI is the checkbox "Restore MBR". Another link if you want more ...


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A conversion without losing your partitions is possible, but your system won't be bootable after you make such a change. My own GPT fdisk (gdisk and related programs) can do this, and I believe some commercial third-party Windows tools can do so, too. Windows ties its boot mode tightly to the boot disk's partition table type; Windows can boot MBR disks only ...


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Open an administrative command prompt and run these commands in order: bcdedit /deletevalue {default} bcdedit /default {current} This: Deletes the {default} value Sets {current} as the default for bootmgr to load


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Debian will install and boot just fine on a GPT partitioned disk in a BIOS booting system. All it requires is a 1 mb bios_grub partition.


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You shouldn't have to - looking at the specs for the microserver, it probably has UEFI (it's a semi-modern core i3 or i5 - and those have never come with bios). It might have an 'old school' text interface for the bios but that's fine. The system apparently officially supports 4tb drives anyway. If you wanted to do an exotic boot, and wanted a seperate ...


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Yes, GPT works fine with most BIOSes – as the BIOS boot process really only involves running the bootcode in sector 0, and it's up to that bootcode to actually interpret whatever partition table it needs. (For example, syslinux has separate MBR & GPT versions of the bootcode, and LILO just hardcodes the offsets instead.) Similarly, it's up to the ...



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