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I suggest you take a look at BIOS/MBR-based hard drive partitions of Windows. Partition layout If you install Windows using a bootable USB key made by Windows Imaging and Configuration Designer (ICD), it creates the following layout by default: a system partition, a Windows partition, and a recovery tools partition. So, no, deleting the ...


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Physical position of partitions has nothing to do with the boot sequence. The boot code is stored in the MBR, and it then calls the bootloader at the right position on the disk, not caring about partitions. If you want to remove this partition, I suggest you do it from Windows itself, that way if it might break anything Windows will tell you.


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Both of the previous answers (by Hennes and Moses) get some parts right and some parts wrong. Here's the correct set of answers: To elaborate on what Hennes wrote, MBR is limited to partitions of 2^32 - 1 (that is, 4,294,967,295) sectors that start no later than the same value (counting starting from 0). Given a sector size of 512 bytes, this works out to ...


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I've read that MBR does not support drives with more than 2.2TB. MBR has a limit in a field where the maximum number that that field supports times the old 512 bytes sector size was 2TiB. That limited it to disks of 2TiB (marketing speach 2.2TB) or less. These days we also have consumer drivers with 4K sectors and the limit for MBR with those drives is ...


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Ok, I fixed it by repartitioning my second disk using EASEUS Partition Manager from Windows, and then reinstalling Ubuntu. Looks like Windows 10 didn't like the way I created partitions from GParted.


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I was given the answer over at AskUbuntu. I thought I would share here in case any body else sees this thread. The answer was posted by 'Byte Commander' "If you add Fedora again, that will also install GRUB again and overwrite the MBR. So I think there's no advantage in installing the Windows bootloader to the MBR first. However, if you really want to first ...


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As now you have dual-boot-system so I would recommend you NOT TO JUST REMOVE THE UBUNTU Partition as you won't be able to boot Windows because the information pointed by MBR will be gone. As you have poked your MBR so I guess you should follow THESE steps: 1) Booting from the Ubuntu live CDs. 2) Enabling universe repositories - launch System->...


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Windows is perfectly capable to understand both MBR and GPT partitioning scheme on different hard disks, regardless of the type it was booted from. So yes, your GPT /Windows/ (not the hard drive) will be able to read the MBR hard drive. Something like that is constantly done when you plug in a USB key, which also is most of the time partitioned (albeit with ...


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For your first question: MBR is limited to 2.2 TB. It's highly likely you think you are using all 3 TB but you are not, OR you think it's MBR when it's actually a GPT disk. I would check Disk Management which will tell the full story. For your second question: hard drive partitions have nothing to do with BIOS/UEFI and more to do with the operating system. ...


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So you need using GPT for your Hard Drive. And also a boot manager that support booting from GPT/UEFI. The only boot manager that I've found and support booting from GPT/UEFI is rEFInd. Take a look here http://www.rodsbooks.com/refind/



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