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5

Cause its faster, and people are willing to pay more. While the article was written about DDR3 - puget systems found little difference and in some cases worse performance with overclocked ram except say in an AMD APU. IMO, quantity and matched ram over quality. Basically make sure you have identical sticks of ram to take advantage of it. Go for the cheapest ...


3

You are correct, for DDR4, any speed faster than 2400 MT/s (1200MHz per channel) requires overclocking. This is because the JEDEC standard for DDR4 only goes up to PC4-2400, so in order to run the ram at that speed, an overclocked SPD profile like Intel's XMP is required to operate the RAM at its full potential speed. It is important to note however that a ...


2

Frequently vendors test compatibility with existing memory modules thats fit. And not update documentation when bigger modules arrive. But it can be locked in "BIOS". Look for user expirience. Lenovo Y700 contains two SO-DIMM slots. Users reports upgrade to 32 Gb (2x 16Gb) Do it on Your own risk. But You risk just in cost of new RAM modules.


1

As in used SO-DIMM socket, module slide in place (in up direction on photo) almost itself by own weight. For new socket, some reasonable insertion force must be applied (about 4 kg) in up (related to photo direction) in 30 degree until it fit in socket and then easy push it down to click. As example, look how deep inserted module fits in socket. Don't ...


1

I was wondering that whether all the data in Computer has to go through the Processor or are there any Bypass Routes(like DMA) through which data goes Input/output (I/O) is almost always between the peripheral device and memory. Peripheral to peripheral transfers are highly unusual, as it requires specialized hardware, and makes error detection/recovery ...


1

For case 1 and 2, the data goes via the CPU. Consider the following: The crane is unable to move a crate onto or off the truck without the crate going via the crane in the process. For a CPU to write something, it'll somewhere along the way read the data first. Case 3 is a bit different: In this case, the GPU can read it, as it does the job itself, but only ...


1

Acording to the specifications of the motherboard on RAM Dual Channel DDR3 memory technology 2 x DDR3 DIMM slots Supports DDR3 1333(OC)/1066/800 non-ECC, un-buffered memory Max. capacity of system memory: 8GB* You should get rid of the Ram stick you have and buy a pair of sticks. 4GB per stick at 1333. (non-ECC) Never mix RAM sticks. If you are using ...


1

Your motherboard supports the following memory frequencies. PC3-6400 @ 800 MHz PC3-8500 @ 1066 MHz PC3-10600 @ 1333 MHz Your motherboard only accepts non-ECC, un-buffered DDR3 memory. G41M-VS3 Specifications:


1

If you look at your motherboard specs here, it supports non-ECC/un-buffered DDR3 RAM at 800, 1066, and 1333(Overclocked) speeds with a max capacity of 8GB. Your current RAM stick is showing 398mhz so that would be a DDR3 800 stick. Your computer will only run as fast as the slowest piece of hardware so there isn't much point in adding anything faster ...


1

Windows 10 seams to have a memory leak issue in Explorer. An user reported that installing KB3172985 which brings the OS Build to 10586.494 fixes his memory leak issue. So make sure your Windows 10 is up to date.



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