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10

If you look at the physical memory module, ECC will usually have 9 (sometimes more) chips. Non-ECC will have only 8 (or rarely, 8x2=16).


10

I don't know how to do this in general, but to measure total memory usage of Chrome you can write about://memory to address bar. The Summary section shows total memory usage of all Chrome processes.


8

The general answer is: You can't, not accurately. Assuming you're asking about RAM (physical memory) and not virtual - Windows publishes two relevant counters for each process, the total working set and the private (to the process) working set. (PerfMon will show you these.) Task Manager shows the "private" and "shared" (added together these would give the ...


6

On a Mac you can look in the System Information application to determine ECC status of the Computer and each RAM module. /Applications/Utilities/System Information Select Memory on the right pane, under the hardware section. Then with the "Memory Slots" listing selected. The window below should show an ECC status. See picture below: Also as an FYI ...


3

Since malloc is just a library function, it depends on your implementation of malloc. But there's no system call it can use to get access to pages that belong to another process unless that other process did something to give you access to them. Typical malloc implementations get their pages either by using sbrk or by mapping /dev/zero, both of which give ...


3

inxi can do that: $ sudo inxi -m -xxx Memory: Array-1 capacity: 32 GB devices: 4 EC: None Device-1: ChannelA-DIMM0 size: 4 GB speed: 1333 MHz type: DDR3 (Synchronous) bus width: 64 bits manufacturer: Kingston part: KHX1600C9D3/4GX serial: B7ED5A53 ... Here non ECC-RAM modules are used EC: None


1

No, Linux does not zero its menory after releasing it. Most libraries implement zeroing the memory while allocating it, but this is programming language dependent and can be overridden. Accessing "warm" memory doesn't seem like a fruitfull attack vector to me. To exploit that, you'll need privileges that can be used in much more effective ways. Finally, ...


1

The top command will show the processes currently running along with their memory usage. The RES column reports the memory actually used by a process. Press Shift + M to sort by that column. Press the Q button to get out of the screen again.


1

So, guys said, that all apps read/write stuff on HDD even if you have a lot of free RAM. Is this true? Yes, in general, that's true. How much and how often will depend almost completely on the specific application(s). Not to mention the Page File usage (which SSDs are awesome for, BTW). For more specific information on that, perhaps check out this ...


1

Make sure sure your memory is compatible with the following: Dual channel, 2 slots, Non-ECC, 240-pin DDR2, Un-buffered Types: 667/PC2-5300, 800/PC2-6400 Source IPM31 Motherboard layout reference


1

This is normal behavior. Free memory is entirely wasted so modern operating systems do everything they can to avoid having free physical memory. Consider some memory that's in use and contains data read from, or written to, the disk. Consider what happens if the operating system makes that memory free: That takes effort, so there's an immediate ...


1

This TechNet article about adjusting managed memory limits for Windows 2000 discusses the subkey HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Memory Management I've spotted the node in Windows 8.1, so I assume it and the relevant items were also present in Windows NT 6.1, along with other keys: The two limits you're asking about can ...



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