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30

While they are the same physical part as a header, generally with PCs 'headers' are pins you attach leads to. Say, the HDD LED or the Power Switch leads. Pins specific to jumpers are refered to as "Jumper Pins" and are arranged into "Jumper Blocks". A reference Another


5

Your original CPU a Phenom II X4 955 is a AM3 socket product. That is the reason it worked with your AM3 motherboard. The AMD FX-8320 is an AM3+ socket product which is not supported by this specific motherboard. The motherboard's specifications indicate the following: Support AM3 socket for AMD Phenom™ II processors High-performance HyperTransport 3.0 ...


4

No special extra motherboard hardware is required to use those devices, what those devices are is called a "PCI to PCI bridge". PCI actually allows for 256 separate "buses" to exist at once, each bus can contain up to 32 devices. While the motherboard is performing its startup enumeration if the PCI device it is communicating with responds that it is a PCI ...


2

Found the solution! The culprit was the Intel Graphics driver! I've updated it to the latest version several weeks ago. Uninstalling the driver solved the problem right away (even without a reboot)! I've then installed the old gfx driver offered by Windows Update and the problem remains still solved. 799 MHz at idle with balanced profile!!


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according to the system specs for that mainboard (http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=4745#sp) you need to have a CPU with built-in graphics - exactly as Journeyman suggested. Can you tell me what CPU you are using with this mainboard? Here is the CPU compatibility list (http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=4745#)... ...


2

When you install a Fan, you plug the Fan into those connectors. By doing so you can manually adjust the speed of the fans probably by some switch on your case. There's Fan connectors on the motherboard aswell, which let's you control the speed of the fans with a program (provided to you by your motherboard manufacturer)


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Possibly yes. That IDC connector is basically just the same electrical connections but just in a compact connector for motherboard connection use. Just look at this image taken from this Amazon listing for a, StarTech USB A to USB Motherboard 4-Pin Header F/F 2.0 Cable, 6" (USBMBADAPT): Note the exposed wires as well as the text on the motherboard header ...


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You’re confusing “PCI” and “PCI Express”. They are not compatible. Your board does not have a PCI slot at all. So you cannot use this NIC.


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I'd probably call them "connectors". But I wouldn't stress too much about the semantics, I have heard IT professionals use every one of these terms at some time or another.


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There's an older version of the spec that's available at Intel.com: Thin Mini-ITX spec 1.2. The fundamental differences are: Z-height restrictions on the I/O shield. SODIMM instead of traditional UDIMM memory On-board power-supply adapter, so you use an external brick power supply. Locked CPU location. Many chassis have custom thermal solutions, so a ...


2

From what I've seen over years of using random desktop RAM in random computers, if it's the right type/ (DDR3, DDR, etc) and it fits in the slot, then it should work (at least set to auto in the BIOS). If the motherboard accepts "DDR3" RAM, then it should accept any DDR3 compliant RAM. Here's a snippet from Wikipedia that mentions DDR3 voltage, hardly a ...


2

A storage controller as you are describing is a PCI or PCIe device, so the maximum number, type, and firmware behavior of the PCI/e in devices your system will control the maximum number of drives you can use with your system. The other physical limiting factor will be the power supply you'll need to power each drive. Just a brief look on newegg.com I'm ...


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Please understand that even if the Server RAM does fit, boot, and runs your desktop you might not be getting what you bargained for. I don't know if the RAM will work on your Desktop (nor do I care to find out) I do know that it wouldn't be what you expected. I will give you a link to a YouTube video that answers your question (with ram, cpus, hard drives, ...


2

That was a complete and utter pain to find, but I managed to sniff it out. Multiple sources here,here and here call it a clip style standoff - the last of which is a vendor who sells it under the name. More importantly icrontic has a good picture of one, so you can email your preferred parts vendor and get what you need,


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Judging by this: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-GB/windows7/products/system-requirements it looks like you might squeak by - the graphics will be a problem. 80Gb hard drive is also going to cause problems. Windows 7 is big - the 16Gb minimum quoted is not really fair. It uses so much more than that.


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We need to know your motherboard make and model to be sure. I've seen mixed results in my time. Some non-ECC capable motherboards will handle ECC RAM fine and others not. If you're buying new RAM, get non-ECC RAM: KVR800D2N6/2G You'll still find them. They're rated max 800MHz, but your PC will run them at 400/533/667 depending on what it's capable of. ...


1

First of all the choice of your graphics card has nothing to do with the RAM. Also your motherboard supports 4GB RAM modules because as stated in the specifications it supports up to 8GB RAM in 2 slots (so it supports 2 x 4GB). On the same specificationss page you see that your motherboard features a PCI Express x16 slot which is compatible with the 3 ...


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AMD has 'CnQ' tech to slow the clock to reduce heat production. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cool%27n%27Quiet If there are some programs (such as benchmark) require heavy CPU workloads, the CPU freq will back to 3G.


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To answer my own question: in the end it was my graphics card that was broken. Be sure that if you want to deduce what's wrong with your pc you remove the cmos battery after you remove a component, as this can affect your test results(it did in my case, if I didn't remove the battery after removing my graphics card, it still wouldn't start, which made me ...


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My computer also did this and I solved the problem by replacing the PSU. Mine had similar symptoms: whilst shutting down, CPU fan speed increased and continued to run. The power button stayed lit. I don't want to speculate about whether the PSU was underpowered (it was only 185 watts). However, when I replaced it, I used a 300 watt unit. Now it shuts down ...


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I was having a similar problem. The fan speed would vary all the time at the slightest change in CPU usage making the sound of it impossible to get used to. My solution to all fan speed issues1 is to install SpeedFan. There are also a few alternatives for linux should that be your OS of choice. 1Besides regular cleaning


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My guess would be while your board supports an igpu but your processor dosen't have one. You mentioned a Athlon X4 760K (on chat) - which by all accounts, dosen't have a IGPU. You'd want an A series processor for that.


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Yes. The amount of the actual watts or amperage drawn vary depending on the device and mainly on the configuration. I have attached detailed info of each components. Do check the same below.


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Check the manuel for the motherboard ,before upgrading the ram, or building a system. Dual channel operation, tripple channel memory operation, and even quad channel operation may be supported. If you only have one ram module, in only one slot, you will NOT get dual channel operation when supported. For tripple channel you must install 3 modules. Quad I do ...


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Have you tried installing the drivers from ASUS? www.asus.com/Motherboards/RAMPAGE_FORMULA/HelpDesk_Download/ The Audio driver says SoundMAX, but a thread at TomsHardware said it also resolved problems for Supremefix II. Locating driver files manually Do you have a backup of of your old Win 7 install before upgrading to 8.1? Drivers should be located in ...



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