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12

Your motherboard is not at 123'c. Your application is reading a sensor that does not exist, or is reading data in a format it doesn't understand properly. Not all motherboards have the same number of sensors, and not all sensor chips have all inputs connected. It's perfectly normal for sensors that don't actually exist to give imaginary readings, whether ...


5

I did some research on your hard drive: it's a SATA 2½ HDD. All you need to do is get an external drive enclosure with an USB connection, which will cost about $10. Then you just plug it into another computer and save your files to the new computer. Hope this helps.


2

The CPUTIN sensor on many motherboards is usually a non-standard (or sometimes, even non-existent!) sensor, and thus the values it output are usually not in degrees, but an implementation-dependent scale of values. It's always the most accurate to use the temperature sensors inside the CPU itself. Most modern CPUs have a temperature sensor in each core, as ...


2

No you cannot use a i5 or i7, unfortunately, as i5 and i7's are either LGA 1366 (1st gen), 1156 (1st gen), 1155 (2nd & 3rd), 1150 (4th), or 2011 (4th). The motherboard only supports the LGA 775 socket of processors, which was right before the first generation of LGA 1366 'i' processors. Those 6 types listed under your link are the types of 775 processors ...


2

Yes, your computer can accept this video card. The GeForce GTX 750 Ti needs just 60 W, which is about 30 W more than what the GeForce 210 requires. The reference version does not require an auxiliary power connector. This is well inside the limits of your PSU (350 W total, 19 A on +12V). An overclocked version of the GTX 750 Ti may draw ...


1

Whether or not the 123 degrees Celsius number is real, the 15.79 volts for the +12V power bus is rather concerning. I would recommend you go back into your bios and see if it agrees that the voltage is 15. If so, power off your computer at once, as this may indicate a faulty power supply or motherboard. If your power supply is really so far off, it's at ...


1

Looks like it is just broken. As @Ramhound said in the comments, BIOS will not take care of the internals of the GPU. The fan working tells you the GPU has power, but no more. It actually neglects issues regarding the GPU not being powered properly. If the GPU was working before and now it makes your motherboard not to start due to problems, I would ...


1

While you were dissembling your laptop, Did you remove heat sinks then clean old one and put new Thermal Grease? If not!?, be sure you do it in right way! (Do not put too much of it! just check youtube videos) Also be sure your cooler fans work properly. You can use any Free Hardware monitoring programs. (like: Open Hardware Monitor or 'SpeedFan' or Aida64 ...


1

This could be any number of problems. Possibility 1: Your power supply could be fried. This is less likely though, because if it were a problem with your power supply, then the computer wouldn't come on at all. Possibility 2: Your motherboard is broken. This is more likely. Because of the many components on a motherboard, if a single one stops working, ...


1

This Anandtech review suggests that it does do something but probably helps more on USB 2 and small files rather than USB 3. What this suggests to me is that it is essentially a buffer or disk cache layer that can optimise the order that files are written to the device. That makes sense though. There is no way that the software can make the underlying ...


1

The manufacturer tells you a maximum at the time the machine comes out, i have a 430 with 2 8gb ddr1600 chips in it and it works fine. Memory capacity is dependent on chipset and processor. the i5 can handle 32gb of ram but the h61 chipset wont let me go that high. Manufacturers want you to think that your machine is maxed out on memory, sounds good to a ...


1

In my 8 years as a IT tech I'v found that jump starting a PSU by shorting the green and any one of the black connectors on the 24pin cable, assuming the fan spins, does NOT mean the PSU works. IE it doesnt mean the PSU can supply enough amps to power on the system. I'v 'revived' a few boards that were suspected dead by doing the following: Remove all ...


1

I don't think they are especially specific to a manufacturer. However, your motherboard has to have a slot to fit one. This is still relatively rare and so standardisation may still be poor. The TPM chip sits on the LPC bus so that the BIOS has access to it without needing drivers. So start by checking your motherboard specs to see whether it is capable of ...


1

You can re-use everything except the motherboard itself. Your RAM and video card will fit in any new motherboard with the correct type of slot. As far as the video card is concerned, you need a PCIe x16 slot, which is basically standard on every modern board. For RAM it'll work as long as the new motherboard you choose accepts the same type of RAM (i.e. ...


1

The RAM module in the picture is of a low-voltage variant of DDR3, as indicated by the letter 'L' in DDR3L. It is an extension to the original DDR3 standard, and probably is not supported by your mainboard chipset (Intel G41). Intel's oldest desktop architecture that has official support for DDR3L is Ivy Bridge. Your only option is to get a standard DDR3 ...


1

If you've confirmed the new CMOS battery is outputting the expected voltage, then more than likely it's not your problem. Next steps: Reset the BIOS to defaults (option in the BIOS), save and reboot. If that doesn't work, try (re)flashing the BIOS with the latest version offered by the Motherboard manufacturer (Asus). If that doesn't help, replace the ...


1

Call me Captain Obvious but the problem is that you broke your PSU in three different ways: you bust capacitors, you replaced one of them with the wrong value, and you blew the fuse. When the fuse blew, there's a good chance you destroyed more of the electronics, since fuses take a very long time to melt compared to how long it takes electronic components ...


1

That metal wire thing is a handle. You can just pull it up. It should not take too much force. In other words, it looks like the connector pulls straight up off of the motherboard. I've seen these plenty of times. If in doubt, though, you should not have to force it too much, just apply firm and steady pressure as you pull it and it will pop off.


1

You have only two options, since the LED is controlled by the motherboard, and You can not change it with software You keep using your sticking tape. You unplug it from your motherboard, and configure your bios so You can power your PC from your keyboard. EDIT: to be more accurate in my second point, I suggested disconnecting the power cable from the ...


1

The memory stick was faulty. I had it replaced and got a Kingston KVR800D2N6/2G DDR2 2GB instead. On a side note I'll also add that even though I have CL5 RAM memory installed, this new CL6 memory worked along with it just fine - all on auto settings without any manual modifications.


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In addition to Solid Snakes answer you could, if you have a Desktop PC with free SATA slots, mount the drive in there. Depending on the file/operating system this will work out of the box.


1

The answer to your actual question is 'Yes you can put a regular PCIe graphics card in there'.. Motherboard Spec Anything else becomes a hardware recommendation & is therefore off-topic.


1

The first and obvious question I have to ask is: Are you sure that the actual BIOS ROM is corrupt and not just the CMOS memory? Have you tried resetting CMOS? There should be a jumper on the motherboard (I assume you have the ability to open the chassis as you're going to pry out the BIOS chip). If you can't find the jumper there should be a round batter ...



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