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5

This is why you make regular image backups. ;) Anyhow, changing just the motherboard shouldn't cause any problems with your installed software, as long as you can get the existing Windows install to boot. If you get a similar board, with a similar drive controller, then it will probably boot without much hassle. In regards to your installed software ...


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The general consensus is that you're probably slightly better off turning the computer off. When the computer is off, it's safe from spikes, surges, and overheating, which are the kinds of things that can really shorten its life. The heating and cooling, if not rapid or extreme, is not as bad as being hot all the time. Of course, turning the computer off ...


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Your motherboard supports DX 10.1 for the onboard graphics and has no relation to your external card. So yes, it will support a DX11 card (onboard graphics will be disabled).


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This has to do with internal addressing of ram chips of the module. If it's outside the chipset addressing then there's nothing one can do (more specifically - memory controller's addressing capability, which not necessarily may be part of chipset). It's not only architectural (in the meaning you probably ask). It goes deeper: Ram chip -> Ram module -> ...


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Your new installation may have not configured drivers correctly. Try deleate drivers for those hardwear and restart. next you may also try free tools like SlimDrivers to check and update your hardware / software configurations. references: http://www.escotal.com/IRQ.html http://smallbusiness.chron.com/repair-windows-keyboard-driver-46858.html ...


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Your motherboard supports PCI Express version 1. There is no problem if the PCI Express version of your card and motherboard are different, they are backward and forward compatible so you should be fine with the card. I used to have a very similar system like you. I had a Intel 945GZ chipset based motherboard which supported PCI Express 1 and on it I used a ...


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Part of the problem is that its only one chip, so you are running at single channel, meaning your highest possible frequency is about 1066Mhz. Additionally, at present, in order to get speeds greater than 1600, you need to enable an overclocked XMP profile in the BIOS for most motherboards. Since you are in Single-Channel mode, the frequency for 1600Mhz ...


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Doing a little analysis of what CPUs are supported I can safety say that ASUS P5G41-M will support the Intel® Core™2 Extreme Processor QX6700 (8M Cache, 2.66 GHz, 1066 MHz FSB) because it supports Intel® Core™2 Extreme Processor QX6800 (8M Cache, 2.93 GHz, 1066 MHz FSB) the power requirements are identical and the QX6800 was released after the QX6700. You ...


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The first set of RAM you linked to is buffered as well as ECC which means it definitely won't work. Buffered RAM is typically for servers so you need to make sure the RAM you buy is listed as unbuffered. The second set of RAM doesn't look particularly good quality to me, and it does clearly say it's for AMD systems so I wouldn't risk buying it. You might be ...


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To be positive, you would need to contact Gigabyte. To be called DDR2 Ram, the ram chip needs to have an SPD chip containing JEDEC information which identifies the RAM Module to Bios. They also will contain extended information. On Intel it's called XMB and on AMD chipsets it's called EPP. If the PC Bios doesn't understand EPP or XMP it will fallback to ...


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Statistically, the most times I encountered this problem it was the PSU at fault. PSU would not provide enough power in order for the system to boot up, due to bad capacitors. If you have an onboard video card, try removing the discrete card and try again to boot with onboard-only. If it works, its certainly the PSU. Considering what you already tested, two ...


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There will be a difference, assuming your SSD's are relatively modern ones, which are capable of fully utilizing the SATA-3 interface. However, the max theoretical throughput for SATA-3 is 750 MByte/sec (6Gbit/sec) which is insanely fast. For comparison the max theoretical throughput of SATA-2 is 375 MByte/sec (3Gbit/sec) which is still very very fast. ...



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