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Your root file system is mounted read-only. This likely happened on a reboot. There are a few options: Configure the system to fix errors during reboot. On Ubuntu this is controlled by the FSCKFIX option in the file /etc/default/rcS. Reboot in recovery mode and run fsck -f /dev/disk/by-uuid/e45e30eb-efa4-4cd9-aaf9-c6cbe46aa41c and reboot again. Boot ...


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Connect to the manufacturer's site and look for the disk recovery software. Almost all manufacturers have such a tool (Western Digital's is called DLG if I recall correctly). It might be a tool which runs in DOS or windows. These tools are able to switch bad sectors for spare ones, and get the disk at least logically correct again. There might be some files ...


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Gpart NOT Gparted OR testdisk (and its other included tool photorec) are great BUT as with everything of this nature do it unmounted (from an installer or other OS) and with as little writing to the drive as possible in the interim


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sudo cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/by-uuid/$(uuid of respective LV crypts) foo then; sudo mount /dev/mapper/foo-bar /$mntpt then to fix or in place tweak crypt use cryptsetup-rencrypt (not installed by default) this assumes you know ALL passphrases or keyfiles OLD cipher is NOT required only the new desired one


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To prevent Linux from failing when the root FS goes offline, you would exactly need to move your / directory out of troublesome device. When the drive crashes, in order to recover/remount the volume, your system will need access to its basic tools such as mount or ls, located in /bin and /sbin, and also to their associated libraries in /lib. Keeping these ...


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The /etc/udev/local.rules file on my system looks like: ... # Media automounting SUBSYSTEM=="block", ACTION=="add" RUN+="/etc/udev/scripts/mount.sh" SUBSYSTEM=="block", ACTION=="remove" RUN+="/etc/udev/scripts/mount.sh" ... I suppose you have something similar. If you need to allow automount of a single specific USB stick (or a limited number of known ...


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You can't share partitions, you can only share filesystems. You can't share special files such as device nodes. You could try to retrieve the data on the server using dd and netcat, but likelihood is that reading the disk image will fail at the kernel level when you hit the bad blocks. Run "badblocks" on the server first to mark the bad blocks as such, ...


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I think this is a routing question. mount_smbfs will let FreeBSD decide which IP and Interface to use. From your question I get that em0 and em2 are both in the same subnet as the target 10.1.1.20? If this is the case you could change the interface metric of em0 to be higher than em2. FreeBSD will then choose em2 for outbound connections to this subnet. This ...


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Your drives dirty bit is set, a hexadecimal setting universal to all operating systems but not a perfect indicator of damaged files since it can be set ON arbitrarily and indiscriminately turned off with myriad of tools. Based on the Catch22 you're experiencing, I'd power down your system, safely disconnect the afflicted drives. Reboot just your Windows ...


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Try fusermount -u remote to unmount the mount point.


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I used the registry edit on wikipedia so Windows would automaticaly create the drive when starting (tested on Windows 8.1): Run regedit. Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\DOS Devices Add a new String Value with the drive letter as the name example: X: Set the value using one of the following formats (Replace ...


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On your answer you are suggesting a process with two copies: from /var/log to temporary folder from temporary folder to new /var/log However you can do it in a single copy-process Mount the new disk in another place different of /, for example mount it on /media so its path will be /media/var/log. Do the copy from /var/log to /media/var/log. After it ...


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If you know the order the sticks were plugged in you could use dmesg to see which USB device was mapped to /dev/sd*, they should show up there in the same order they were plugged in. Also, if you could try udevadm info -q path -n /dev/sdb and iterate over the possible devices to see which has the USB connection info matching the stick you want.


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the device: USB mp3-player of the simplest type. Just a USB stick with headphone jack. what happened: Mac crashed whilst it was mounted. For "of the simplest type", may we read "it cost next to nothing"? :) You're assuming the problem was caused by the Mac crashing while it was mounted. But probably cause and effect are the other way round: if ...



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