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Dell laptops that come with Ubuntu preinstalled have a selection of hardware selected for optimal compatibility with Ubuntu that is different from the same model Dell laptops that come with Windows preinstalled. In addition to this, the default UEFI settings of Dell laptops that come with Windows preinstalled are optimized to run Windows well. So in addition ...


7

The Windows installer (more importantly the automated creation of the boot manager/BCD data) doesn't have the ability to identify other installed OSes (such as Ubuntu) and therefore give you the choice upon boot. In contrast, however, the Linux installer (again, more importantly the GRUB2 installer) DOES have the ability to identify that other OSes exist on ...


4

First, you wrote: I do not have enough portable storage for backup FIX THIS PROBLEM IMMEDIATELY!!!!! I frequently see problems on this and other sites caused by people who have inadequate backups. Because of accidents or hardware failures, they lose all their personal data. That out of the way, your computer uses EFI firmware, not BIOS. One of your ...


3

Here I share what I learned about this, after struggled with it for quite a few days. I have a dual boot system with Windows 10 and up-to-date Debian testing, and would like to share the same bluetooth mouse. Mine is a Razer Orochi mouse. I am giving all the credits for the following people and their work: 1) ...


2

I have almost the same problem (Hackintosh + Windows). The solution I found was installing another disk controller. These can be cheap ($30) or expensive (real RAID / SAS card on PCIe bus). To the point: Install Windows on its own disk. The motherboard SATA ports are good for this. (Leave the other controller plugged in.) After Windows has been installed, ...


2

Most times YES. You will have to repair your bootloader. After you upgrade Windows, using a bootable Ubuntu USB or CD Run it -> Install and run 'Boot repair' -> Recommended Repair and reboot the system. hope this will help you if you get problems.


2

There are hundreds of step-by-step guides on how to dual-boot a Windows OS with a Linux OS. You don't need to label the partition. The Ubuntu installer should automatically identify that Windows 10 is installed on your computer already and, when GRUB2 (the Linux bootloader) is installed to the start of the disk, will create a menu where you can choose ...


1

The best guide is the official one from Ubuntu I think. It details some pitfalls and considerations you need to have in place before you proceed. Have a look at that fine piece of documentation right here - and do make a backup first. You can use wbadmin that comes with Windows to create a backup from a command prompt with administrator privileges: wbadmin ...


1

To remove ubuntu from a usb you would reformat the usb (most likely to some format your other OS uses like fat32 for windows). Reformatting can be done using disk management in windows, by using a tool like gparted on linux (gparted live disk perhaps?) or by running commands to delete the partitions from a linux command line and reformat your flash drive ...


1

Windows 8/8.1 during installation has created a new "System Reserved" active partition (350 MB) so the old BCD from Windows 7 should be still on the 100 MB "System Reserved" (D:). The only problem I can see is that new "System Reserved" is far away from beginning of disk but as long as you can boot Windows 8/8.1 there seems no problem. Solution: To add ...


1

If you only formatted the partitions then you will need to decide if you want to install CentOS to those partitions - and manually select the partitions during the install - or delete the partitions (leaving "free space" on the disk) and let the CentOS installer guide you through the partition creation using the free space (it does the partitioning for you). ...


1

The issue, really, is that Windows ties its boot mode to its partition table type: EFI-mode booting requires GPT and BIOS-mode booting requires MBR. Thus, you need to boot the Windows installer in EFI/UEFI mode, not in BIOS mode. This topic is covered on many sites, such as here and here. Before you proceed, though, you should figure out if Ubuntu is booted ...



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