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Same situation. Rather than trying to force the upgrade after being stuck in the boot loop, I was OK with just going back to Yosemite and forgetting El Capitan ever existed. Surprisingly, this got me back to booting Yosemite: When presented with error message select Apple Menu -> Startup Disk ... -> Select HD -> Confirm Reboot Back to booting Yosemite like ...


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Start ubuntu from live cd, install grub-customizer e check what happened


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If you install Ubuntu (or other OS) after installing Windows, Windows should not change the boot record. However if Windows thinks that the master boot record has problems and attempts a fix, it will destroy your boot settings, and you have to use the Ubuntu Live USB to boot in and manually fix the issue.


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You are assuming RAM wipeout upon poweroff is immediate, i.e. infinitely fast. Though this is a widespread belief, it is not true: this Princeton Univ. paper shows that data is retained potentially for many seconds, occasionally even several minutes. Let me quote: Abstract Contrary to popular assumption, DRAMs used in most modern computers retain their ...


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Short answer: Yes; It is possible and it is easy. Just take a look at Serva. (I'm related to Serva development)


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To restore back your 8GB you might want to use Ease Partition master. It has a way better functionallity than the default one in Windows. Just delete all the partitions on your USB and then format. I had a similar issue when trying to restore microSD card with Windows 10 IoT image on it. It was showing 3MB in exlporer.


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OK! As per the comments above, you burn the ISO onto the USB. I have had trouble with that in the past and I find that using dd is easier and more reliable. Look at this wiki post to see how to do it properly: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/USB_flash_installation_media I know it's for arch Linux, but it definitely works. I have personally installed ...


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I tried a web search for linux your motherboard name linux MotherBoard - Gigabyte 990FXA-UD3 and the first link was here http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2143433 Originally Posted by quattro_cs View Post In the BIOS, set IOMMU to "Enabled". That fixed both USB and networking for me. And further down, it suggests adding the boot option ...


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This is a common problem. Windows uses local time by default and Ubuntu uses UTC. Here is an article explaining how to resolve the issue a few different ways. Multiple Boot Systems Time Conflicts Operating systems store and retrieve the time in the hardware clock located on your motherboard so that it can keep track of the time even when the system does ...



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