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The articles in your question state that Ubuntu will refuse to mount NTFS partitions that it see's to be hibernated or with Fast Startup enabled. They state that the danger only lies in trying to modify data partitions used by an OS with Fast Startup enabled, or is hibernated. This doesn't have the be a main operating system partition (such as C:\). Even ...


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You can chroot into your install from a live distro. This would allow you to run your grub2-mkconfig and genkernel all again. Remember to mount /boot first.


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@yuvi, you've chosen a quite difficult path but it is doable. Multi-booting is tricky in itself and doing it across operating systems with only one disk drive adds two more layers of complexity. Next time you contemplate it, consider this (some of which has been mention earlier): Determine if your system is BIOS or UEFI based. A Windows installation ...


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I'm personally a fan of P.I.N.G and/or Clonezilla. They aren't super fancy looking and Clonezilla can be intimidating but whenever I use them they simply work. I've used dozens of cloning software that claim 1:1 ratio but don't always get the booting correctly. This goes without saying but make sure you create a backup before trying the suggestions below. ...


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As far as I know, no. While you can use MBR-partitioned disks within UEFI, you cannot use BIOS (MBR) format bootloaders, as they expect to run in a mostly "fresh" system, not inside the UEFI-prepared environment. So GRUB.efi doesn't even attempt to start one; it expects you to give an .efi path only.


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You can't do what you want with GRUB, but you can do it in at least two other ways, at least with most UEFI-based computers: You can use your firmware's built-in boot manager. Typically, you access this via a function key early in the boot process. It should present options to boot whatever EFI-mode boot programs you've installed (such as GRUB, probably ...


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Boot the system you have on the first HDD and then, using a Boot Configuration Data (BCD) editing tool, add the system on the second drive to the first drive's boot menu. To add an additional entry to BCD you can use Windows' built-in bcdedit.exe (it is a command-prompt tool, run bcdedit /? to get basic usage info) or a GUI-based BCD editor. Once in a ...


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I use bcdedit as @MBu said. and i would like to write here the step i did. Boot from the os which in the primary partition ran cmd as administrator bcdedit /copy {current} /d "description i wanted to display" this copied current entry and listed and it gave an ID, and i copied it to the clipboard. bcdedit /set {ID i copied} device partition = D: this ...


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Since this appears to be a bug with Windows 7 for which there does not seem to be a fix, I ended up working around the problem by "fixing" my Linux disk by converting the partition table from MBR to GPT using gdisk and then un-borking my Grub2 install via an Ubuntu live CD and boot-repair.


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If Windows can see one partition on a disk, then it can see them both. The best you can hope for is removing the drive letter from the partition you don't want access to. Any method you use is going to be "faking" things one way or another. If you want to physically cut yourself off from the other partition so you can't even access it by accident then ...



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