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You can, but it's not a great idea. In GRUB, what you would do is specify different kernel and initrd files for each distribution installed on the system. However, the boot configuration for one distro may conflict with the configuration for the other distro(s), depending on how each distro sets its boot configuration and names its files in /boot. This ...


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You can have other system directories on different partitions. To answer your question the best I can. You might be able to share /boot, but it's not recommended. Personally, I don't think it's worth the headache at the end of the day.


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I used to do exactly this. I never mounted the system drive of the hibernating machine to avoid accidents, and each OS have their own separate swap partition. However I had a dedicated data partition, which I would use to transfer data between the two hibernating OS. I even put my Firefox and Thunderbird profile there, so I don't need to keep two separate ...


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Short answer: It can be done, but it would break a lot and have performance issues. Reason: In addition to your personal files a lot of other data is kept in your home folder e.g. configuration files. If you would go with NTFS partition for home then this would not enable you to use appropriate permission on files. Using ext4 on Windows 8 is not well ...


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WARNING: If you create another partition in OS X after installing Windows with Bootcamp, it is very likely your Windows partition will become unbootable. Apparently Bootcamp cannot handle more than 4 partitions: EFI, OS X, Recovery, and Bootcamp/Windows. Be sure to make backups and be aware of the risk of losing your Windows partition if you create an ...


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Clearing Up Misconceptions linux doesn't support Nvidia drivers out of the box because of legal issues While this is technically true for completely separate reasons, Ubuntu (which is not just Linux; it is Linux plus a great many other (separate) things clobbered together) does ship the proprietary Nvidia and AMD graphics drivers as a default part of ...


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Try with latest Ubuntu version and check for Additional drivers in settings.


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Just for reference, I solved this issue. Short answer: it's not possible before installing Windows using Bootcamp, but it is possible after. You can create another partition in OS X after installing Windows in Bootcamp and restore a back-up of a previous OS X version on that extra partition.


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On MBR dual-booting Windows 7 and Linux is pretty clear: Always the MBR from first disk in boot sequence (set in BIOS) is loaded and executed. This MBR can be from Linux then GRUB takes control or MBR is from Windows 7 then boot manager (bootmgr) takes control. Boot Configuration Data (BCD) in Windows has eventually several boot entries and if so bootmgr ...


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I dual boot using Grub in Unbuntu. Select a default boot, then give yourself a few seconds to select another boot option. Grub is found in Unbuntu: /boot/grub/grub.conf Settings similar to: default=0 timeout=10 splashimage=(hd0,0)/grub/splash.xpm.gz # section to load Linux title Ubuntu Linux (2.4.21-1.ent) root (hd0,0) kernel ...


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First: we need to know which exact method and steps you have taken during installation to see where it went wrong. A common installation error is not to restore Bios Boot order after you have booted from external installation media. F2 or Delete to enter Bios setup. Sometimes, " due to installation error" you can find windows boot option within Ubuntu ...


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Yes. I've used VirtualBox to boot a usually dual-booted Linux system under my Windows install before now, and is actually reasonably simple: Use vboxmanage internalcommands createrawvmdk -filename <output-file> -rawdisk <disk-device-name> -partitions <list-of-partitions-you-need> to create a .vmdk disk image. If running under windows, ...


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As far as I understood you are having an issue with installing Windows (this answer was written before the question was migrated). If you still think you have an issue with Ubuntu, then please state more clearly what issue you have. Everything I find on the Internet tells me to turn off Secure Boot. The UEFI BIOS has stopped me. I have worked with 4 ...


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Easiest way is to just unplug the main harddrive prior to the installation. It will not be able to alter its files or boot order. If you then boot and use the boot menu to select USB drive, it will work as expected. Alternatively you could look into using a virtual machine and install the OS in there. That is not the same, but depending on what you want to ...


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The keys are not visible to the admin, you should open the registry as the system account: This is for Windows 7 on a ThinkPad with thinkpad bluetooth 4.0 adapter but might work with other windows systems Download PsExec: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb897553.aspx Unpack it to c:\portable\pstools\ open cmd click start, type cmd, press ...


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You can try and boot up the Windows OS and go to power options and completely disable the hibernate feature and make sure the hibernate file (hiberfil.sys) is deleted from the disk. CMD line code for this is: powercfg.exe /hibernate off If the hiberfil.sys still exists then go check the advanced power features under the critical battery behavior and ...


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Finally, I have found the solution. But the solution doesn't explain why I have been facing this dual boot issue. But I have found no where that these steps that I am going to explain below, are mentioned any where. Following steps were performed by me: Step 1: Installed Windows 7. Please note that I had 3 partitions after Step 1. /dev/sda -> ...


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I fixed this issue by using efibootmgr. I don't have Windows installed, but the process should work similarly for you. If you can't boot into Ubuntu, use a live version. First make sure you have efibootmgr installed $ sudo apt-get install efibootmgr Then check the partitions from which EFI can boot $ sudo efibootmgr BootCurrent: 0000 Timeout: 5 seconds ...


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My laptop is set to boot from USB then HDD. Apart from security concerns, there's no difference that it makes during startup unless you have a bootable USB already plugged in, in which case you'd have to prevent yourself from "hitting any key" to boot into the USB if you want to boot into the HDD instead. For me it is worthwhile since I tend to boot from ...


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Technically, yes, the MBR and the GPT are stored in different locations. Practically all GPT disks have a special "protective" MBR. It's possible to have a "hybrid" disk by just writing regular partitions to the MBR instead of the "protective GPT" partition. Usually though it can get really annoying and risky to always keep both tables in sync. See the ...


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I'm just passing on the solutions on how to avoid the 'famous 30 seconds wait' I came across here and here, which might be what you're experiencing: The idea is to mount the EFI partition under Yosemite, which should be achieved by running in a terminal mkdir /Volumes/esp sudo mount -t msdos /dev/disk0s1 /Volumes/esp Under the esp volume that you ...


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yumi is a good choice for me. It handles the iso exctraction and partitioning. It also has a nice gui when you boot, and a helpful interface for removing ISO files when you are done. The only thing it doesn't do is downloads the ISO for you like unetbootin. And I don't know if it was just a victim of circumstance but I could only get the archlinux usb to ...



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