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Let's take the easy one first: A 2011 Mac would have a 64-bit EFI, so that means you should install 64-bit versions of all your OSes on it. (Most OS X versions provide both 32- and 64-bit support via "fat" binaries.) You can often get away with a 32-bit OS, particularly if you boot it in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode; but a 64-bit version gives you greater ...


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There's a button on the side, left of the power button, press that and your laptop will boot into settings menu. Here, you can choose whatever boot options that are available for your laptop.


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Instead of creating NTFS partition, leave free space. Windows 7 needs small partition(100 Mb) for bootmgr, so let installer make partitions automatically. Also, make sure, that SATA Mode is set to ACHI in BIOS Setup, it's only correct mode for SSD.


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Since you have Windows 7 on your computer, you can also use windows 7 to clone your disk. as long as your small hard drive has enough space for the data on the hdd, you can use a disk clone freeware, such as AOMEI Backupper,to clone your hard drive with a few clicks. If your small hard drive does not have that much space, you can slim your HDD by removing ...


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Install Windows first, then Ubuntu. To change the bootloader, install GRUB Customizer with: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install grub-customizer Launch it, then move the Windows Boot to the first spot (with the up arrow button in the List Configuration Tab). The Windows boot is usually ...


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By my experience: You can run multiple VirtualBox guests (I don't know about VMWare) and have then working side-by-side with host sleep mode. I have a Dell Inspiron running Windows 8.1 as host with 1 Windows 7 guest and 2 Linux guests (Ubuntu and Debian). When I close the lid of my laptop all the guests still on without adding extra power consumption ...


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1-Clone linux partitions first with clonezilla, if still bigger then your hard drive check the option "-icds" : 2-resize it with gparted to make space to win 7. 4-clone win 7 partition. 3-if you get boot problems do update to grub : How to Repair, Restore, or Reinstall Grub 2 ps: sorry i can't write better than this :/ .


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To clone Windows 8.1 from the HDD to a specific partition in the SSD is easy. There are many software on the market free or paid, such as AOMEI Backupper. you can use system clone,including all programs and files on C: drive, to a partition on the SSD. You can install Chameleon Install to create multi-boot choices.


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I generally recommend keeping at least two kernels for each Linux distribution. This is especially true when installing a new one; occasionally a new bug creeps in, or a filesystem error occurs, which causes a new kernel to not work. In such cases, having an older kernel around as a backup can greatly simplify recovery. That said, you can limit the number ...


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Seems that what I have added in later edit holds. See the LE again below Booting the Win8 boot menu entry would start either WinXP or Win8 randomly Actually, it might not be the case. Win 8 has this feature of "Starting earlier Windows version" which did boot Win XP OK prior to having had the MBR rewritten with Grub2. Afterwards, instead of ...


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It is normal because you installed to many OS to PC.The PC will be unstable.Try to force shutdown os you are using.I don't know how to force shutdown In Linux But in Windows You can Enter This Command To Command Prompt:"shutdown /f /s" (Sorry For bad English)


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So far my guess is that the password requirement when mounting is a red herring. The real problem is that you have to manually mount the partition at all. And you do this after Variety has started. So it starts, looks for wallpapers, decides that they're gone, and resets the path. You need to have the partition mounted on boot, which is done through fstab ...


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There were several things wrong after I cloned partitions, none of which I was aware. on Linux several programs rely on device UUID instead of /dev/sdX notation. As a matter of a fact in e.g. /etc/fstab it is the recommended way. In my case that were entries concerning swap partition, as a result initializing script got stuck at mounting it for a while ...


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I would use Windows 7 Disk Management to shrink the existing partition. Then install Ubuntu on a newly created partition. Leave Windows 7 as the default when booting. Windows 10 is scheduled to launch at end of July. If you want Windows 7 and 10, then I would create an additional partition. If you want to upgrade from 7 to 10 then make sure to use the ...


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The easiest way is to install Windows first and then linux. Linux tries to play nice with other operating systems. When it detects that Windows is already installed it will set its bootloader to allow you to boot both operating systems. When you install Windows first it will ask you whether you want to use the whole disk or part of it. You should choose ...


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Have you considered using something like VMWare and creating a virtual machine for Ubuntu on your Windows desktop? I've created dual booting in the past and also found it to be a little clunky, but if you're just looking to have an install of Ubuntu to work with while still having Windows virtualization is a great choice. I'd recommend VM over dual boot for ...


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Warning: This is a highly sensitive operation. You can very easily damage your system and lose data. What worked for me may not work for you. You would be wise to make any needed backups before proceeding. My experiences and this website are the source of this information: ...


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Dual-boot Repair tool can help. One-click solution - "Automatic Repair" which places latest Windows version in control of the booting (Windows 7 in this case) and fixes Windows XP boot files if necessary.


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To answer your two questions, I would go for 15.04. It's stable enough. I don't think upgrading Windows will mess up boot records, no matter if they're MBR or EFI. About the clean install, I suggest a restore of Windows because I can see you have a backup partition LENOVO. Afterwards, you should try to install Ubuntu in EFI mode.


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Problem solved as follows: Follow the second option: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair Boot-Repair will ask to run a command prompt in Windows at the end of the process, which in my case was: bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\ubuntu\shimx64.efi Note: You will need to start the Windows prompt as administrator. Press Windows + X then "Run ...


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For some reason when you installed Ubuntu grub didn't install right. You will want grub since it will easily let you select Ubuntu or windows. Here's a guide on how to install grub.



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