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0

To answer your two questions, I would go for 15.04. It's stable enough. I don't think upgrading Windows will mess up boot records, no matter if they're MBR or EFI. About the clean install, I suggest a restore of Windows because I can see you have a backup partition LENOVO. Afterwards, you should try to install Ubuntu in EFI mode.


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Problem solved as follows: Follow the second option: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair Boot-Repair will ask to run a command prompt in Windows at the end of the process, which in my case was: bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\ubuntu\shimx64.efi Note: You will need to start the Windows prompt as administrator. Press Windows + X then "Run ...


2

For some reason when you installed Ubuntu grub didn't install right. You will want grub since it will easily let you select Ubuntu or windows. Here's a guide on how to install grub.


-1

As far as I know, what you want is not possible. I have a fair bit of experience with this kind of set-up and the nearest solution would be to dual boot mint/windows, have a shared folder for your vm residing in a separate(windows readable) partition. That way your data is accessible everywhere but the core installation of each windows is different. As ...


0

you simpely can't add linux mint to a ARM chromebook without having lag problems and a riks of chrashes however you can still downlad it if u check out this website : http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/install-linux-chromebook/ in the post he dose tell you the risks of installation on the ARM powered chromebooks and if you want linux the you should buy a cheep ...


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Have you considered using Virtual Machines with a single base OS? It would make maintenance of the systems much simpler, as well as allowing you to boot multiple systems at once. You can create snapshots and backup systems very easily. You could still use your external device to accomplish this.


1

I would recommend one of my favorite tools, YUMI. Look it up, it uses GRUB, has a nice GUI, and supports tons of operating systems. http://www.pendrivelinux.com/yumi-multiboot-usb-creator/


0

I found this and it worked for me: 1) Press the Windows Key (or Windows key plus 'R') 2) Type msconfig then press return (or click Enter) 3) Choose the Boot Tab 4) Delete entries other than the Current OS 5) Restart your machine and it should go straight to correct OS


1

Not directly an answer to your question but related: As far as I know Windows needs to be on the first two partitions - one small SYSTEM_RESERVED and the windows main partition. About your question: I'd go with this as I would with installing All this on a normal hard drive, not using fancy tools like unetbootin or something. I guess this would give you most ...


1

To use GPT, your Windows must boot in (U)EFI mode. Normally Windows install DVDs are dual-boot (both legacy BIOS and EFI supported). When you set you boot device to DVD, your BIOS starts with legacy boot method (red book). But if BIOS finds that DVD is UEFI-bootable, it should add another entry to boot menu that will allow this. To boot with (U)EFI, you ...


0

Virtual Machine - An emulation of a particular computer system VirtualBox - A hypervisor for x86 computers from Oracle Corporation A virtual machine is just that - a virtual computer inside yours. VirtualBox is a free program that enables you to create and run virtual machines. Here's a video I found that will show how to install CentOS on VirtualBox: ...


1

Uninstalling any one OS in dual boot system can be done simple. Have a look on uninstall windows 7 on a multiboot system


1

Windows boot files are either on active partition in case of MBR disk or on EFI System Partition in case of GPT disk. A. In the case of UEFI boot and GPT disk you can delete the partition of the OS you want to remove without problem. A.1. If the OS to be removed is Windows - you have to delete also the corresponding BCD entry for loading that OS. A.2. ...


0

The disk partitioning tool in Ubuntu (usually GParted) is capable of resizing both Windows and Linux partitions. You might need to boot from a USB pen or a CD, but once the OS is booted, you can run the parititoning tool to shrink the windows partition, and increase the size of the linux partition. It is critical to back up data from both systems first as ...


0

Try boot-repair-- it fixes problems just like yours. http://www.howtogeek.com/114884/how-to-repair-grub2-when-ubuntu-wont-boot/ HTH


0

OK, MariusMatutiae pointed me in the right direction. The actual problem was that the Intel Smart Response HDD + SSD combo was set up in a fake RAID configuration. Never occurred to me to look in Windows 8.1 for a way to disable it, but that's where it was (search Apps for keyword 'Intel').


1

You can use the Offline NT Password & Registry Editor (chntpw) bootdisk, or since you have Linux installed already simply use the static linked binaries instead. Be sure to read the documentation and walkthrough first.


0

A non-specific example: [boot loader] timeout=30 default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS [operating systems] multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Your existing Win2K" /fastdetect C:\ = "Old DOS based OS here" http://www.techsupportforum.com/forums/f6/easy-fix-what-does-a-normal-boot-ini-for-win98-look-like-37763.html You would ...


1

Let me address the "why" part. One of the reasons for a modern OS is to allow multiple programs (processes) to run at the same time on a system. If you want to do this safely, the following needs to happen: You probably (unless you have special needs) don't want to divvy up the RAM in the system in a fixed fashion - e.g. 256MB fixed per process - limits ...


1

Sorry if I am resurrecting this thread, but I thought maybe this might be helpful to others. Your problem may be that your boot options are fine, but your bootmgr has a timeout set to 0. This will cause your bootmgr to appear to be skipped as it will choose your {default} boot option right away. Same applies as above. You will need to get to a command ...


0

Open Disk Management Win+R: diskmgmt.msc and review your partitions. Find the one which has (...,Boot,....) that partition has your boot section, if you are formatting it, you may loose the boot sector and will be unable to start the second OS until to repair the boot sector. Also if your Windows 7 partition has the boot sector and you format that one, a ...



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