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Installing in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode was a mistake; you've now got a BIOS-mode installation of Linux and an EFI-mode installation of Windows. This is a problem, and to correct it, you must install an EFI boot loader for Linux. There are several ways to do this, but the two easiest are likely to be: Download the USB flash drive or CD-R version of my rEFInd ...


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If you installed Win 8 after win xp then the win 8 bootloader has probably taken over. You can just format your XP drive!


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Quack Quixote is likely correct. I imagine your computer may be detecting them at just slightly different times leading to one being considered sda rather than what you expect (sdb). If this is the case, the fix is simple: don't use /dev/sdX references in your bootloader config or fstab. I prefer using the disk label, but some prefer using UUIDs. Can you ...


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Boot Info Script normally produces much more output than that, but it's obvious that you do not have an EFI System Partition (ESP), contrary to what you believe. You've got the Master Boot Record (MBR) on both disks and Windows is installed in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode. There's no evidence that GRUB is installed on the disk, although it could be that the Boot ...


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Try Sabayon. I installed the KDE and Gnome flavors in two different laptops (HP & Toshiba) already having Win8 pre-installed, meaning that I happily ended with dual booting. Only one USB writing software worked well to create the pen drive, rufus_v1.4.3.exe I used. Rufus has the ability to format the pen drive as EFI if asked to do so; so I did and ...


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This answer was originally posted as a comment by the OP, who did not return to answer the question. Because Stack Overflow permits posting somebody's comment as an answer if it is deemed to be such, I am answering 'on behalf of' the OP, incorporating @sgtbeano's comment about LVM. It looks like /dev/sda9 was a Logical Volume Manager (LVM). After I did the ...


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Windows 7 supports both AHCI and IDE mode, but IDE mode will be slower, some features might not be available, and you might run into issues due to the wrong drivers being loaded. Is there some specific reason you'll have to run Windows XP natively/without a VM? I'd recommend you try some virtualization software, such as VirtualBox. This allows you to run ...


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Switching your drive to IDE from AHCI will not render your Windows 7 install unusable. You will have to reboot it once on your first time booting into Windows 7 tho, as it will update the hard drive controller driver. One alternative would be to use something like VirtualBox, which is free and would allow you to visualize Windows XP while still being in ...


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The answer to your question is, NO you can't. Here it stress that If Windows is installed in EFI mode, then you must boot the machine in EFI mode. and in "Chainload none-EFI Linux from EFI Linux" it says, no boot managers can chain load from EFI mode to BIOS/CSM/legacy mode, unless it is Your firmware's boot manager or rEFInd boot manager. So chameleon ...


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To answer your original question, no. Windows cannot be loaded without going through it's own bootloader (in the case of UEFI installs, bootmgfw.efi). This is because Windows expects that bootmanager to be there AND to call winload.efi. If that does not happen, then Windows will crash until you fix the problem. There are many reasons to this (practical ...


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Use free EasyBCD to move boot record (it's called BCD - Boot Configuration Data) to SSD drive. Start EasyBCD and look into "BCD Backup/Repair -> Change boot drive". Of course you should backup the boot record to a file first and it's a good idea to create a USB with bootable Windows 7 installer in case boot loader gets damaged. Generally EasyBCD is a great ...


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You need to add the Windows EFI bootloader to the list of boot options in the UEFI firmware. That way, you will be able to choose whether: GRUB2 should be loaded or the Windows Bootloader should be loaded Additional options such as the DVD drive, external harddrives or network boot should also be visible at that point. The UEFI bootloader usually resides ...


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Triple-boot? That's SO very 1990's! Seriously though, have you considered Parallels or VMware Fusion? All of the fun of other Operating Systems without the hassles of messing with the boot sector. AND you can run them side by side. Save yourself the headaches of multi-boot and get a hypervisor installed. Your system will be a lot more stable in the ...


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I'd say it depends on the game and you might be able to hack it to do that. The reason is that may have been written to read/write places that are common - say like your profile then it might be difficult to get it to run from an alternative location and not read/write to the common locations. However if the game is not gfx intensive then you could run a ...


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You can do installations in any order i.e. Installing GNU/Linux and then Windows or vice-verse. Just do the following after you have installed all of your operating systems. Get the "Boot Repair Disk" from here. http://sourceforge.net/projects/boot-repair-cd/ Create a Live bootable USB Pen Drive of it (Instructions on pendrivelinux.com ) Or burn the ISO ...


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First you will need to boot your computer into the System Recovery Options screen. This is usually done with the installation DVD, which should be inserted into the optical drive. When the computer boots, Press any key to boot from CD or DVD as requested, select your language preference and then click Repair your computer. A list of installed operating ...


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The data in Windows Partition will be removed if you format that partition and again reinstall the windows in same. And you stated that you are using Dual Boot, whether you are using GRUB or Windows Loader to boot into Ubuntu, you will loose that loader, so to format without messing, here is what you should do Back up your data from Windows Partition ...


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Dual booting is quite the pain, and yields [virtually] zero benefits over virtual machines. With that said, I recommend VirtualBox. It is extremely easy to setup. That way you can have hundreds of OS's with dynamic storage that is completely separate and can be used in parallel to your existing. And it makes it easy to create snapshots of a base image ...


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I'm assuming by "corrupted" you just mean that Linux won't boot or is broken for some reason. If this is the case, you don't have to do anything to "make it usable again." Distributions like Ubuntu typically have a good installer that shows your drives partitions and lets you choose where to install. If you just want to start over with your Linux partition, ...


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It sounds as if you're using the standard Windows bootloader, and you already have an option in there for your Fedora installation. You should be able to change the default bootloader from the Windows command line. From an admin command prompt, run bcdedit - this should list all the boot options. You'll want to change the default, so something like: ...


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You can use a program like EasyBCD to edit the boot loader and make Fedora the default system.



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