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After a little more persistence I have come up a step by step workable solution for migrating from BIOS-Legacy to EFI bboting so I'll answer my own question now. This applies only to booting multiple copies of unbuntu (or some flavour) and assumes you are starting from scratch with a new or repurposed drive and that your motherboard is fairly new (mine is ...


0

The only way I know to do this is to go ahead and install Windows 7 and then use the Ubuntu disk to fix the dual boot. You can set up windows 7 to be the boot manager, but I found it easier to just let Ubuntu handle it. Let me know if you need more detail.


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This sounds very much like the modifications you have done have wiped your boot block. Dual booting a Mac is never a good idea it is far better if possible to make use of the virtual drive software available this will give you a far better integration with your computer. If a dual boot is necessary then check the Dual Boot Camp assistant to make sure of ...


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I've been in a similar situation before and used this tutorial to resolve the issue: https://www.linux.com/learn/tutorials/776643-how-to-rescue-a-non-booting-grub-2-on-linux/ If an encrypted install of Ubuntu was done, I don't think the filesystem can be found.


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is it possible to share the contents of your /boot/grub/grub.cfg file (the one that loads the OSes) from the terminal (with networking eth or wifi) run: Blockquote cat boot/grub/grub.cfg |pastebin This will output a http://paste.linuxmint.com/..... url can you share that here so we can hopefully help fix or modify it to get BOTH systems back up and ...


2

The articles in your question state that Ubuntu will refuse to mount NTFS partitions that it see's to be hibernated or with Fast Startup enabled. They state that the danger only lies in trying to modify data partitions used by an OS with Fast Startup enabled, or is hibernated. This doesn't have the be a main operating system partition (such as C:\). Even ...


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per question 1: not without loosing boot time speed on windows per question 2: it would have to be fat16/32 or ntfs for BOTH OSes to see it and be able to modify it (not sure if fast boot would play a role but seems likely to some degree at least) per question 3: you can but as far as i know fastboot + hibernate is at best miserable and linux while ...


1

If Windows can see one partition on a disk, then it can see them both. The best you can hope for is removing the drive letter from the partition you don't want access to. Any method you use is going to be "faking" things one way or another. If you want to physically cut yourself off from the other partition so you can't even access it by accident then ...


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If you installed and partitioned everything correctly, all you have to do is: Right click My Computer -> Manage -> Disk management -> Right click on the drive you want to be invisible -> Remove You can also assign drive letters here. I'm not 100% sure this won't destroy your data, so be careful and try it on the data HDD first.


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You can use a third party software like EasyBCD, it will create a boot menu for both hard drives with both options of windows you're installing.


1

@yuvi, you've chosen a quite difficult path but it is doable. Multi-booting is tricky in itself and doing it across operating systems with only one disk drive adds two more layers of complexity. Next time you contemplate it, consider this (some of which has been mention earlier): Determine if your system is BIOS or UEFI based. A Windows installation ...


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I have tried doing it in another way. Try installing windows XP first in C drive, and then install windows 7 or 8.1 in D drive. The boot menu will automatically do everything and you won't have to do any tweaking or extended settings. Hope this helps.


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Since this appears to be a bug with Windows 7 for which there does not seem to be a fix, I ended up working around the problem by "fixing" my Linux disk by converting the partition table from MBR to GPT using gdisk and then un-borking my Grub2 install via an Ubuntu live CD and boot-repair.


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There will be a special key which you press when the machine is booting which tells the BIOS to ask you to select the boot drive you want to use. But which key depends on which motherboard manufacturer. It may tell you at boot time which key to press. These are the commonest keys, you can try them: F8, F11, F12, ESC Or if you let us know your motherboard ...


1

You can't do what you want with GRUB, but you can do it in at least two other ways, at least with most UEFI-based computers: You can use your firmware's built-in boot manager. Typically, you access this via a function key early in the boot process. It should present options to boot whatever EFI-mode boot programs you've installed (such as GRUB, probably ...


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Try to reinstall windows with formating hard drive. If it won't work see the text bellow. Firstly you need to think about what you will doing because you can run out with broken computer. All operating systems after you delete them continue keeping data in your data storage. You can't delete this data without reseting your data storage so you need to reset ...


1

I use bcdedit as @MBu said. and i would like to write here the step i did. Boot from the os which in the primary partition ran cmd as administrator bcdedit /copy {current} /d "description i wanted to display" this copied current entry and listed and it gave an ID, and i copied it to the clipboard. bcdedit /set {ID i copied} device partition = D: this ...


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If you're using GPT and UEFI, you're not going to have a problem. It just works. MBR is tricky, though, as it has a cap of 4 Primary partitions. Fortunately, you can get around this by creating what's called an "Extended Partition." These things can contain almost infinite other partitions. When you use the Ubuntu install disk, load up GParted and make all ...


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I had exactly the same problem after installing Ubuntu 14.10 on a disk with Windows 7 on it. What solved it was running this command from Ubuntu: sudo update-grub That detected Windows 7 and added it to GRUB. Had to reboot twice, once past a "Missing operating system" message, but it worked in the end. See also this question on Ask Ubuntu.


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Boot the system you have on the first HDD and then, using a Boot Configuration Data (BCD) editing tool, add the system on the second drive to the first drive's boot menu. To add an additional entry to BCD you can use Windows' built-in bcdedit.exe (it is a command-prompt tool, run bcdedit /? to get basic usage info) or a GUI-based BCD editor. Once in a ...


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Try to type on terminal in kali linux LiveCD. ~# sudo update-grub Then you should see that Win 8 is listed in terminal.


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As far as I know, no. While you can use MBR-partitioned disks within UEFI, you cannot use BIOS (MBR) format bootloaders, as they expect to run in a mostly "fresh" system, not inside the UEFI-prepared environment. So GRUB.efi doesn't even attempt to start one; it expects you to give an .efi path only.


0

You could try use Boot-Repair, its an repair tool that solve problems like yours, when you can't boot Ubuntu after installing Windows or another Linux distribution, or when you can't boot Windows after installing Ubuntu, or when GRUB is not displayed anymore, some upgrade breaks GRUB, etc I suggest the best way to use Boot-Repair is to create a disk ...


1

You can chroot into your install from a live distro. This would allow you to run your grub2-mkconfig and genkernel all again. Remember to mount /boot first.


0

Have you tried SARDU ? Create a USB stick, or other removable media, multiboot quickly and easily with antivirus, recovery disks, Linux Live , Windows PE (or Recovery Disk) and multiple Windows installer (Windows XP, Vista, Seven and Eight)? SARDU is the best and fast solution.


1

I'm personally a fan of P.I.N.G and/or Clonezilla. They aren't super fancy looking and Clonezilla can be intimidating but whenever I use them they simply work. I've used dozens of cloning software that claim 1:1 ratio but don't always get the booting correctly. This goes without saying but make sure you create a backup before trying the suggestions below. ...


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I have the same problem, and solved as i explained : 1 - You should turn off fast boot, and secure boot, search how to do it on google. 2 - Search how to open UEFI(BIOS). Change the boot mode from boot tab, and save and exit bios. 3 - Press F12 at the start, there will be many choice, Windows Loader at the top. In this list, a choice (Start from HDD ...



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