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To be honest I recommend against such automated usb makers, one can often do exactly the same with standard GNU/linux tools, eg dd, grub and syslinux (and there are windows ports of said tools.) But, to answer your question, it could be a number of things. Perhaps the tools in question are not designed with the idea of a 64gb usb stick in mind, perhaps the ...


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Some usb stick manufacturers factory partition drives with tables not suitable for creating a bootable drive. Formatting makes no difference as it does not affect the tables, just erases the contents of the primary, visible partition. (I had issues with a "reputable" brand before with this issue.) If you have access to a Linux box, plug the drive in, find ...


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Looks like your USB stick appears as an external hard drive to the OS. While Linux doesn't care and gives you a standard /dev/sdX device node for it, on which you can still dd almost any ISO image on (I do that with the Archlinux ISO all the time and it works perfectly), Windows obviously likes to complicate things and that doesn't work too well. In ...


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From the docs: You need to mount rEFInd first using (assuming rEFInd is the first partition of disk0) sudo mount -t msdos /dev/disk0s1 /Volumes/esp Then sudo rm -r /Volumes/esp/EFI


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I used a tool to accompish it. im not 100% sure this will work with windwos 8 but it worked very well with windows 7 and windows xp dual boot. The tool is called EasyBCD.


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Paragraph 2 - install overtop of Ubuntu partition should work. Don't need to remove the partition, but erasing files or reformatting couldn't hurt, I don't know if every distro will erase old files or try to use some. May need to repair your windows bootloader if it's gone after deleting Ubuntu & decide not to install another linux. -> After reading ...


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Yes, technically this is possible, using raw mappings. You would basically install Linux normally, as a second OS, so you will be able to dual boot. Then in Workstation, for example, you would use the existing OS install as the drive for the VM. Have a look at this article on the VMware website: Configuring a Dual-Boot Computer for Use with a Virtual ...


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In Ubuntu Server 14, edit your grub.cfg file to change the default OS to start at boot. (/boot/grub/grub.cfg) (Note: Different distributions may locate this configuration file in other folders and change the name, but if you find your file, the theory still applies.) Before you edit, take a good look at your loader screen. The first line is the default of ...


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In order to perform mutiboot, please refer the below Microsoft article: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-in/windows-vista/change-the-default-operating-system-for-startup-multiboot In order to choose which operating system to use when you turn on your computer, make sure the Time to display list of operating systems check box is selected, and then click the ...


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If the source or target disk is damaged, then copying the files off will be slow and (very likely) incomplete. Also, if the external disk is USB, this has a slower transfer speed than a normal disk (USB 3.0 is usually good enough, though). Outside of that, it will depend on the tool you are using. Typically, I find direct device copies with dd to be ...


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I think your hard disk is converted to dynamic. You can verify that with Windows built in Disk management. Now you need to convert your disk from dynamic to basic with help of the How to Convert a Dynamic Disk to a Basic Disk article on SevenForums. (I used minitool partition wizard PROFESSIONAL EDITION). I did not loose any data in this procedure. That did ...


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Windows must be installed to a primary partition, not an extended or logical partition. I checked the error log (in X:\Windows\panther\ I believe), and it says that the partition is large enough but it is not a primary partition. Yet in Windows installation, even when I delete the partition and recreate it, it's created as a logical not a primary partition. ...


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I too have been looking for a clean way to do this and haven't found one yet. I have found a bit of a hack though that others might be interested in... The key to the hack is the xbootmgr tool from Microsoft. This tool is designed primarily for developers to gather timing information to figure out what's slowing down booting. As an added bonus, it wires ...


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You can, but it's not a great idea. In GRUB, what you would do is specify different kernel and initrd files for each distribution installed on the system. However, the boot configuration for one distro may conflict with the configuration for the other distro(s), depending on how each distro sets its boot configuration and names its files in /boot. This ...


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You can have other system directories on different partitions. To answer your question the best I can. You might be able to share /boot, but it's not recommended. Personally, I don't think it's worth the headache at the end of the day.


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I used to do exactly this. I never mounted the system drive of the hibernating machine to avoid accidents, and each OS have their own separate swap partition. However I had a dedicated data partition, which I would use to transfer data between the two hibernating OS. I even put my Firefox and Thunderbird profile there, so I don't need to keep two separate ...



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