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Solved. I change the default boot operations on windows 8 (so it only check the win8 os disk), change some bios settings, did a checkdisk from a cmd line (run by administrator) and had access to the windows 10 install.


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You need something more complex - running 98 "as a program" is kind of an oxymoron - it's an OS. You can run 98 programs in a 98 VM using something like VirtualPC (I don't know the specifics for Win10 as I've not yet played with it), but you can't really run "Windows 98" as a program by itself. And given your edit to the question which crossed my answer, ...


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I Googled this recently, and thought I'd share my solution. If your windows is a Pro or better version: install Windows and make sure dual boot works go into Group Policy and block driver installation for disk drives (you will need to get the GUID for the driver class from Device Manager) Go into Device manager and uninstall the drives you do not want ...


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I honestly cannot think of any issues in dual-booting the same OS so long as you make use of partitions to prevent the OS files from interacting. You could even conceivably have them share storage folders like your Documents/Pictures/Music/Video library folders if you so choose.


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while when we call a hardware reboot , it is more or less identical to a power-off and a power-on subsequently . thus all ram memory are lost . and when we power-on , the boot process is handled by the motherboard firmware . if we want to tell motherboard firmware some message , we must not leave such message in the ram . but we can write something ( ...


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These details might not exactly match how UEFI handles GPT systems, but it does describe MBR-based systems. The official (old) standard is to use what is on the Master Boot Record. The "fdisk" command can be used to change the details of the MBR. The traditional MBR contains some bits that specify whether a partition is flagged. The standard specifies ...


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Yes, it's possible if you use Grub for boot selection:- Boot into Linux. Enable root privileges by logging in, or by using su or sudo -s. Copy /boot/grub.cfg to either /boot/grub.win or /boot/grub.lin, depending on your default. Edit /etc/default/grub to change GRUB_DEFAULT= to the number of the alternative OS in the boot list (counting from zero). Run ...


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Clonezilla live USB runs by default completely from your computer's RAM, which makes it very fast, so there's no point to installing Clonezilla on your computer's hard drive. In addition since Clonezilla live USB is portable, the same installation of Clonezilla live USB can be used on multiple computers. The instructions for making a Clonezilla live USB in ...


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Your question is a bit unclear, but I'll try and answer regardless; In order for you to create an Acronis Boot disk, you need to install the ISO onto a hard drive partition, that grub can use as a boot source. As far as I know, you can't tell grub to boot from an ISO file located inside your other OS partitions. Usually, I would recommend you burn a ...


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I know this is an old question, but I still find it worthwhile answering, because I just had a similar issue myself. The best way to answer your question "How do I install Linux Mint alongside Windows 8 on separate SSDs?" is by pointing to the link that answered the question for me: ...


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This is my testdisk output TestDisk 6.14, Data Recovery Utility, July 2013 Christophe GRENIER <grenier@cgsecurity.org> http://www.cgsecurity.org Disk /dev/sda - 500 GB / 465 GiB - CHS 60801 255 63 Current partition structure: Partition Start End Size in sectors 1 P Windows RE(store) 0 32 33 1019 250 63 16384000 ...


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I would not trust the output of Ext2Fsd in windows. To recover I would do the following: Boot the computer with a Linux livecd. 1. Open a terminal 2. Type: sudo cfdisk /dev/sda the drive letter may be different if you have more than one drive, use "sudo blkid" if unsure. This should reveal your filesystems and /dev/sda* ext4 ... should be present If ...


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Can you make clear whether SecureBoot was is enabled? And obviously, if it was not enabled and if it now is enabled, then reversing it to not using SecureBoot would help.


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I guess the original poster is not going to change his mind about the conversion after reading my post :-) But since the question is up-voted, here are some hints: The first partition is more likely to be a Windows-specific "system" partition, particularly if it is NTFS-formatted (the EFI partition should be FAT-formatted to be useful to the largest number ...


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The correct solution in this case would be to delete element "displaybootmenu" which causes old text style boot menu. Can be achieved easily with Visual BCD Editor. Using "bcdboot" in this case removes the connection with recovery - "Repair your computer" disappears from advanced boot menu.


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Boot.ini is used by the Windows boot loader, which most commonly supports Windows. For other operating systems, like Linux or MS-DOS, I believe you may need to supply some sort of data file (maybe a 512 byte file). Syntax for doing such a thing may be found from Microsoft's official documentation: MS KB Q157992 : Tri-booting NT/9x/DOS. Another option may ...


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This used to work for me: Open EasyBCD in Windows 8.1, click Write MBR (with Install the Win7...to the MBR checked), OK and close. Open an elevated Command Prompt and type bcdboot C:\Windows, press Enter (and wait till cmd acknowledges it). Reboot (maybe twice, try once first). Check if the Win8 bootloader is used. Sometimes when I boot into Ubuntu and ...


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Unfortunately if you are without a bootloader that can point to the partition you want to boot, there's not any alternative other than getting one on there or modifying the current. I am unsure how flexible the Windows bootloader is, but if you're installing Linux you might as well install GRUB from the install environment anyway. You can use os-prober to ...


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I'm not positive, but I think the Windows bootloader gains entries when you install a new version of it (the version being installed is responsible for detecting other Windows versions and adding them to the bootloader it installs) and that it ignores everything else. So if you don't install GRUB when you install Linux, the Windows bootloader will simply ...


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After 1 year I came across the same problem again. Luckily this time I found a solution. In order to add an OsLoader in windows Boot-Manager which loads non-Windows UEFI images you need to manually edit BCD registry. In RegEdit there is a key named "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\BCD00000000" - which is loaded from Windows EFI System-Partition and editing it's subkeys ...



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