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In the order you listed: Policy 4: You are correct. Policy 3: You are correct. Policy 2: You're pretty much correct. If you only have one public IP, all traffic will be NATed to it. This is an explicit rule which is helpful when you have a range of public IPs and different services on different IPs. Policy 1: This rule is a hairpin NAT rule that ...


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Your description of the scenario is almost without reproach. However you have overlooked a crucial bit. When the router receives a packet via the public facing port (WAN), it does not only translate based on the source port, but the source IP/port combo, this is a socket. To be fair, there are numerous various of NAT, I suggest a thorough reading NAT'ing ...


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Your public IP address should be on the equipment provided by your ISP. The simplest way to find it is with the Windows dos shell "tracert" command. Usage works as follows: tracert www.gooogle.com This will show you how many hops to the location specified, and the ip address of each hop. You'll see your local router, likely followed by a public IP address ...


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Please note: Routers are everywhere. What you should be worried about is NAT. “Real” routers on the internet don’t use it. Does every ISP give every subscriber a global IPv4 address...? The answer to that question is, unfortunately, no, absolutely not. Many mobile phone providers don’t have the amount of IP addresses necessary to give every connected ...


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Windows 7 doesn't natively support NAT, however Server 2008 does. You could do this with a more advanced router/firewall, but not natively to Windows 7.


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Sounds like you are trying to do PAT (kinda) if you put a device between A and B you should be able to use PAT to mask/convert the specific port to that of the FW and vice versa. You may be able to get this type of functionality out of a cheap managed soho firewall like a linksys.



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