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TL;DR: You're already using NAT. If you need more addresses, you can create new subnets, or change your network subnet mask to something higher to obtain a greater range. Like, 192.168.0.0/23 (that's a mask of 255.255.254.0). That would give you 192.168.0.1 - 192.168.1.254 as your network range, and 510 host addresses. You're getting 2 concepts crossed ...


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Others have posted good (but long) answers. Here is a short one. By keeping the number of hosts in a domain limited you reduce the amount amount of traffic through parts of the network and you can use this fact to leverage this to increase speed within the network. Having a large "flat" network where all hosts are in a single subnet becomes unwieldy to ...


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As far as I'm aware, all Linksys routers support Auto-MDI/X which means you don't need a cross-over cable. As far as what/how to hook to your "WAN" device to your routers... This needs more information to answer accurately. Most ISPs (cable-modem/DSL/etc...) will only issue 1 public IP to 1 device... which means you can't simply attach a switch to the ...


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Linking and keeping two separate networks are mutually exclusive. If you want two separate networks, then you just use two different routers. If you link them together, then you get one big network, which seems to be what you want since you mention they should be able to ping each other. In that case, you want to use one as a router, and configure the ...


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Can be accomplished a couple of different ways. The easiest in my opinion is to connect the WAN ports to a common switch and set the WAN IPs on both so they are in the same network (i.e. RTR1 WAN 172.16.238.1 and RTR2 WAN 172.16.238.2) and set the internal networks on them to 192.168.X.1 where the X is either 1 or 2 depending on which RTR it is. This will ...



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