Hot answers tagged

4

If it's the internal (LAN) IP changing (which should be outside of the ISPs control), then set the camera up to have a static IP instead of using a dynamic one handled by DHCP. If it's your WAN (public) address that's changing, sign up for a Dynamic DNS (DDNS) service like No-ip, or DynDNs or alike, and start using the host/domain name they provide you ...


3

This is an unmanaged switch. Meaning it doesn't have a way to configure the switch. As configuration is needed to implement VLAN tagging (how else are you going to assign VLANs to ports?) it can't do VLAN. The switch has to be managed. Any modern managed switch is able to do it. (I have encountered hundreds of different make/models/types of switches and I ...


3

It's because those devices are setup for WiFi-Direct. From a protocol point of view a Wi-Fi direct connection is established using already existing mechanisms in a number of steps: In a first step, the two devices that are to connect directly have to find each other. This is done by sending standard Wi-Fi probe request and response frames that ...


3

Ethernet cables can be up to 100 m. If you want to go beyond that length, you need some active hardware in between. A simple solution would be a cheap hub/switch. A simple ethernet repeater would do as well, but they are usually aimed at enterprises and thus probably more expensive than a simple hub. EDIT: I see you added a diagram now and you are already ...


2

If you have a router for each of your lans and maybe an additional switch, you can build your own small "internet" on a dedicated lan0 network. These methods will also work with more than 2 lans: This setup could be accomplished even using basic home grade routers, as they are normally already configured for NAT (Network Address Translation) and ...


2

Most products that properly funded IT departments use to block ads are also capable of blocking proxy servers and VPN connections, so expect some difficulty. Any solution to circumvent this has a high probability of needing the IT department's cooperation. Even if you can do it without their help, it's probably in violation of some company policy. A proxy ...


2

DMZ is a misnomer in most (if not all) consumer routers. There is no “zone”, after all. The correct term is “Exposed Host”. This clarifies things a little. The Exposed Host is not separated from the rest of the network. It still resides on the same broadcast domain. If it were to be compromised, the attacker would have unfettered access to the local ...


2

I know I'm late, but I encountered the same problem recently. Mainly find the solution here: http://ajitabhpandey.info/2007/07/interconnecting-qemu-and-virtualbox-virtual-machines/ Key steps are enable IP forwarding and setup MASQUERADING on the bridge interface: $ echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward $ sudo iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o br0 ...


1

Speaking as a wireless network admin, the short course on 2.4: In most of the world, there are only 3 2.4 GHz channels you should ever use: 1, 6, 11 All the rest of them overlap - the idea that adjacent channels should not interfere with each other is broken in the 2.4 spectrum - accept it and move on. There are only 3, and they are called 1, 6 and 11. ...


1

You should use the scp command, which allows one to copy files from one system to another using the SSH protocol, rather than the cp command. If your local computer is a Linux or OS X system, then you likely already have scp on the system. If your local computer is a Microsoft Windows system and you are using PuTTY, it also has a command line utility, pscp. ...


1

They are tied together - they both share power from the grid. Whether this will work depends on rather a large number of things, but particularly the sensitivity of the gear you choose and if they are on the same phase. If it works, its unlikely to work well, but the only way to see if it works at all is to try it. (Powerline networking is very similar ...


1

Yes, this can be done. You'll want to have a DHCP running, to give addresses to the computers that will visit the web server. (I'm giving this advice based on using IPv4, which currently should work fine for most devices.) A DHCP server is often built into most consumer routers, so that isn't likely to be a big problem. Assign the web server an address ...


1

First off; if your drop rule is first in the chain, nothing will get to your next rules - you need to have that rule after the allow rules. It's a two way communication, so you need to have rules in both directions. Something like this, repeated for port 20, should work, if your drop rule comes after them. iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --sport 21 -m state ...


1

The address 0.0.0.0 is not routable as no network mask can be used to identify it. Applying any network mask to it (with a binary and) will always return 0. As for 1.1.1.1, it is assigned to APNIC-LABS in Australia. Since it is not linked to a domain name, it's probably used internally for their own private purposes. An address ending with .1 will often ...


1

Bluetooth is a low energy standard designed for short distances suitable to devices that don't require much bandwidth. It is considered a personal area network. Wifi is developed as a larger scale network allowing greater distances and speeds. You can see a comparison of their theoretical maximum speeds on Wikipedia. Note that the two protocols use the ...


1

Wifi has more bandwidth (here is a comparison with Wifi direct). Nevertheless, the bluetooth bandwidth should be sufficient for high quality audio transmission. Your choppy experience might be the result of high spectrum usage in your building. Unlike wifi with its fixed channels, bluetooth uses frequency hopping across different channels (Wiki-Link). ...


1

There's a couple of issues you need to explore. First, did you install openssh-server? If not, then $ sudo apt-get install openssh-server Usually, the UFW is modified to allow port 22 incoming connections when you install openssh-server. You can check that port 22 incoming is allowed by doing this: $ sudo ufw status Otherwise, $ sudo ufw allow 22 ...


1

You could set up a DNS server at home that would have an authoritative record for your domain name. You would still have to pay a registrar for a domain name. A registrar must be accredited by the top level domain registry. In the current system new registrars must pay 4,000USD plus a variable fee totaling 3,800,000USD.


1

There are varius reasons for that improvement Initial connection setup time An HTTPS connection needs an additional handshake after the initial HTTP connection is established. Over time the connection latency decreased (from ~100-200 ms with modems to 10-100 ms with DSL and even lower for fiber-to-the-home or other new technologies). With the decreased ...


1

I don't think you understand how torrents work. The 'download' happens the WHOLE time, not 'the website' you use to get the torrent magnet/file. Your ISP shouldn't be monitoring your website usage, so getting a torrent magnet link or .torrent file won't be the issue. The issue would be the traffic pattern that is typical with torrents (large amounts of ...


1

There might be a more elegant way, but this should work: runas /user:DOMAIN\USERNAME "net user /domain" You'll be prompted for your password and then it should run. By the way, you might also be interested in the Powershell cmdlet Get-ADUser.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible