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You can configure both the OSes to ask for static IPs instead of the router assigning static IP addresses based on their MAC addresses. This can be achieved by configuring the respective operating systems' network settings, and have both of them ask for different static IPs. In Windows, these settings can be found in Network and Sharing Center. In Linux ...


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Every time you open that drop down, it will start looking. It automatically assumes that because you've opened the menu, you're looking to change network, even if you're connected. It won't do it when you're connected if the network drop down is closed.


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Unfortunately switches or routers in tight space with bad ventilation can easily overheat, in most cases a reset helps getting it back to life again but just until the next overheating (I have seen switches doing this in cable management boxes on desks but running happily outside the boxes). There is also a really hackish way to solve this problem if 100 ...


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If it was done properly & actually pulled through, then there should be a pull cable left in the space; otherwise you can pull 2 new cables through by sacrificing one of the existing cables & using that instead. The trick is to always leave one more cable/string in a run than currently in use. That will only work, of course, if the runs are large ...


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The device at the end of each cable needs to get traffic only for itself. The router (which contains a switch) does that by sending only the appropriate traffic to that cable. The router can use a cable as a trunk for more than one device but if you use a simple signal splitter at the end, the devices won't be able to distinguish what traffic belongs to ...


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You can reset the router itself to reset the wireless-password. There should be some informations about that in the user-manual. Also there is another way, if you know your router-password itself. Do open the Router-setup, you have to open the router-setup website. Usually 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1. There should be a tab where you can manage your ...


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How can I identify the actual network prefix? I mean, for a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, it's obvious that the network ranges from x.y.z.1 to x.y.z.254 where I am completly free in choosing x, y and z. The same way as with 'regular' masks – using bitwise operations (& is AND, | is OR, ~ is NOT): network = address & mask (all 0 bits in ...


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This is quite obvious when you think about it: Pinging Google doesn't work because you do not have a rule that allows incoming ICMP replies. Things can't "find the server" because you do not have a rule that allows DNS replies. Mailgun can't talk SMTP because you do not have a rule that allows SMTP packets – the TCP SYN goes out, but the ...


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You could install tomatousb firmware on your router, it looks like the Linksys E2500 is supported. This would give you some pretty good bandwidth monitoring tools: dd-wrt is another possibility, but i'm not sure what exactly it displays on its "active clients" page:


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A T1 is a data circuit with 24 channels. Depending on the provisioning, it can provide different bandwidths and you won't get the full 1.544Mbps for your use. B8ZS/ESF "clear channel" uses 64k channels while AMI/D4 uses 56k channels (8k is used for control). Sometimes you'll use fewer channels, such as a fractional T1. 24*64k = 1.536 Mbps (slightly less ...


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This is possible by matching DHCP option 60, “Vendor class identifier”. Microsoft operating systems will send a string starting with “MSFT”. Official documentation is also available. Windows 8 still sends “MSFT 5.0”, by the way. You should be able to check for it with DNSMASQ (which I believe is what DD-WRT uses) like this: dhcp-match=set:windows,60,MSFT ...


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If possible. Ask someone at the location to install no-ip or similar so that you have a dns that autoupdates to the servers ip. That way you can minimize the risk that you have the wrong ip. You can also try an open port tool to see if the port really is open to the internet. http://www.yougetsignal.com/tools/open-ports/


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I made some research and found an article that appears to be related to what you are asking about. SSH and bastion servers By default, Linux instances in EC2 use SSH key files for authentication instead of SSH usernames and passwords. Using key files can reduce the chance of somebody trying to guess the password to gain access to the instance. But ...


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You should not put your secret key on the gateway, and you don't have to :-) setup your local SSH config so you can use the NAT gateway for port forwarding when you need it: create an entry in your ~/.ssh/config that sets up local forwards to the hosts you want to connect to: Host natgw-fwd User ec2-user HostKeyAlias natgw-fwd.my.domain ...


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You'd need a computer in the location(s) you want to ping from. Since you probably don't own a computer in India that you can access, then a third party service is probably best (and easiest, and cheapest). Something like CA's APM Could Monitor's Ping tool (formerly www.just-ping.com) should do it for you; there are many out there to choose from, most ...


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I have quite a bit of experience with dnsmasq on dd-wrt and especially close to the date of this comment. I can share with you my working solution to each of the answers to each requirement. I will resist adding more. Each option in your active /tmp/dnsmasq.conf posted above comes directly from the config options you have selected as described Except for ...


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Sounds like your NAT instance also bounced and didn't come back...Or perhaps you had it in a scaling group and the scaling group brought up a new NAT instance but didn't update the route or source/destination check. Three things to check... is the NAT instance up & functioning? If not, terminate it & create a new one. Is the Source/Destination ...


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Seeding torrents no longer requires forwarding ports. There are many advanced techniques to “circumvent” NAT, e.g. NAT Hole Punching. Naturally, most of these need a fully connected third party to mutually negotiate. That being said, in the simplest case, with a port forwarded, the remote side initiates the connection. You also need to keep in mind that ...


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tcpdump is a tool for Unix / linux based systems for capturing traffic at the packet level. It comes as a source package, as it is an open source package aimed at End users that wish to compile themselves Linux / Unix distribution providers that will package the app in a way suitable for installation (in which case an end user would simple install it ...


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The best answer i can think of and it will require some input from you in order to work with the data is nethogs! Install nethogs (should be in repo) And it will work like this : nethogs nethogs eth1 nethogs [option] eth0 eth1 nethogs [option] eth0 eth1 ppp0 sudo /usr/sbin/nethogs eth0 You will end up with something like this : With this you will ...


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I have no idea what your application is doing, what your network looks like, or what the Unity app is doing. But, TCP/IP works perfectly fine on a local-only network assuming you have things properly configured.


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I'd recommend following Chirag64's advice and configuring the static IP on the OS rather than using DHCP reservations. However, I did find this answer on another network that points to fingerbank.org, which stores information about device fingerprints. Fingerbank mentions the PacketFence tool which can apparently use those device fingerprints to segregate ...


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Problems like this are caused by DNS of provider. Try set up Google DNS IP's for your connection. Google DNS's 8.8.8.8 8.8.4.4 How to do this http://www.opennicproject.org/configure-your-dns/how-to-change-dns-servers-in-windows-7/


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Limit download to less than your download capacity, and upload to less than your upload capacity. The number of connections is irrelevant. If you don't know your download/upload capacity, check the bill from your internet provider, or use a service like speedtest. The menus of uTorrent are self explaining, but here is a step by step guide: ...


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Check following things on PC2: Strength of Wifi-Signal, whether the performance get better if the PC is about 3 Meters from the router. (I once have a Laptop that drops Wifi if placed beside the wifi router) Whether PC2 is using the slow 802.11b.


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This is a bit of a reach, but its worth a shot. Find the MAC address to each of your cameras, then set up a static ARP mapping on your PC so that each camera has its own IP address. With the static ARP in place, you're machine won't try to resolve the ARP for the made up IP address, and will encapsulate the traffic with the correct MAC address. That will ...



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