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21

Only some programs allow to split processes over the network (some 3D rendering programs, effectively sharing RAM) (See answer of Julian Knight) The problem with internet would be that's too slow (See answer of Spiff) I think the RAM of your desktop won't be hardware compatible, so just placing the RAM strips into your laptop won't work. What you can do: ...


9

Probably not, as it would be pretty slow compared to doing virtual memory paging to a local drive. SATA-3 is 6 gigabits per second, and I have a two-year-old 4TB 7200 RPM SATA-3 HDD with a sustained 157 MebiByte/sec (~1.3 gigabit/sec) read/write rate. Sustained transfer rates over gigabit Ethernet are around 0.942 gigabits/sec at best.


8

Although it is practically impossible to separate upload and download between connections (as described in details in other answers) there is possible manual workaround. You can manipulate default connection, switching it depending on task you wish to start. Default connection on Windows is first connected interface, its order is calculated by Metric ...


7

This is not possible. Acknowledgements are an integral part of Transmission Control Protocol. If you split incoming and outgoing data distinctly between two interfaces you would be inherently disabling the acknowledgement component of the protocol. TCP is a connection-oriented protocol, which means a connection is established and maintained until the ...


5

In some ways, this is the same as asking "how does the internet work through air" when referring to wifi. The OSI model of networking describes each layer of a network, and one of the crucial elements of this is that each layer should operate independently of the layer above it or below it. Sometimes this gets a little muddied, and layers overlap a bit, ...


5

Very unlikely. As its name implies a proxy server acts as an intermediary between you and the router that connects to the outside world. When you boot any OS (installed on hard drive or from a live CD or USB), the OS needs a network configuration that can be created manually or obtained automatically from a DHCP server. On any case, the network ...


4

It's possible to use both internet accesses to share the load of download/upload, but always only per connection. So one TCP (or UDP) connection can go only via one link. This is mentioned also in the other answer - for outgoing TCP packets you must receive acknowledgement packets and these must go via the same interface. You could manually alter the ...


4

This was to do with the OpenVPN server's compression feature, meaning that more data can be sent at once. This, therefore, meant the connection was faster. To confirm this, I disabled the compression feature and had this speed: ...whereas with compression enabled, consequently had this speed: It seems that had I used a standard VPN other than OpenVPN ...


3

This is neither trivial or easy. You can use a multi-WAN capable router, but unless your provider natively supports PPP multilink you will also need a server at the other end with sufficient bandwidth to terminate the connection. Otherwise you can only use simple load balancing between the connections which gives you, in simple terms, the ability to download ...


2

Mount to a remote directory on the Mac, using whatever interface you prefer (samba, nfs, etc). Then just dd to a file on the mount point.


2

Since you mentioned that torrents don't work either, I would assume that your computer is having a problem with all UDP traffic. In this case, I would suggest you uninstall every network driver and let Windows reinstall the drivers when you reboot. Basically try to clean completely your network configuration. At worse you'll lose saved networks but that's ...


2

About seven years ago the memory controller was moved from a separate chip (northbridge or memory controller hub) to the CPU. Do you know why? To decrease latency, because the CPU needs very, very high speed access to RAM. Current CPUs access RAM with 68 GB/s : ...


2

Sure, this is definitely possible. You just need to do some port-forwarding settings from your Virtualbox interface. Go to Settings -> Network -> Port Forwarding. Then, add a new rule. In the host port, add some port which you wish to use, say 1212. In the guest port, add port 80 which is the default for apache. Start your virtual machine and that's it. ...


2

You would have to have an overlay (tunnel) connection that supports different endpoints for upstream and downstream traffic. The only protocol that I know of that supports that natively is LISP (Locator Identifier Separation Protocol). If you can find a LISP ISP near you you might be able to buy service from them in addition to your current connections. It ...


2

Technically speaking, this capability is inherently built into all networking built on top of IP (you must have a publicly routable IP address), and activated just by changing your client-side routing table. Most likely traffic intended for the ISP's own local network would continue to be sent through that interface, while all other traffic will go out ...


2

The short answer is: in 95% of the cases it cannot be done, and yours falls within that 95%. First, let me say that it makes little sense to speak of routing separately upload and download, because even intense download tasks require that some packets flow backward to the source, i.e. any download requires some upload flow (This is less true for UDP than ...


2

You can, but you shouldn't: Because of network A's subnet mask, network A can have valid addresses starting with 192.168.2.x. If network B happens to not have these addresses, you can link them together with a router, but it is likely that said router will struggle as any addresses beginning with 192.168.2.x could possibly exist on both networks and thus ...


2

The corrrect way to use SMB name resolution on a Linux machine is to edit (as su) the file /etc/nsswitch.conf and to make sure that the line beginning with hosts contains wins, like this, for instance: hosts: files wins mdns4_minimal [NOTFOUND=return] dns Of course you will be unable to contact any pc not running a SMB server, like for instance ...


2

To connect networks you need a router. If you like to connect 192.168.2.0/24 and 192.168.3.0/24 use your Windows server because a) it is already connected to both networks b) it has the RRAS (Routing and Remote Access) which turns the server into a router when configured Next, you need to set the IPs of the server as default gateways on the clients. That'd ...


2

This isn't exactly what you are after, and maybe i'll think of something else in addition, but this is something you should know. SSH port forwarding You need to get an SSH server working on Computer B. So you can do from comp A SSH is like telnet but with more security and with TCP port forwarding features.You can ignore the telnet aspect of it ssh is ...


2

As the network has no name nor gateway, Windows can't memorize it, I guess. You may want to allow file sharing when being in a "public" network (if the computers can't access Internet that's not a problem). Some documentation about it: http://www.howtogeek.com/school/windows-network-sharing/lesson3/all/


2

A PXE boot/install process has several stages. During the first stage the firmware contained in your NIC card provides the services of a PXE standardized network driver (UNDI). That driver handles the first TFTP transfers like: NBP (network boot program) i.e. pxelinux.0 kernel i.e. on the Linux world vmlinuz initrd i.e. on the Linux world initrd.gz The ...


1

It looks like you don't have a route to the internet configured for the virtual network your VMs reside in. You should try seeing if you can put your VMs in a transparent bridge, or configure a router for the virtual machine network. If you cannot ping 8.8.8.8 from your network, then you must address the routing issue before you can address your DNS ...


1

I think in your case OpenVPN should be fine.


1

On your router if you can run iptables, default drop anything incoming on the outward-facing interface, and then add exceptions: A simple example of what you describe, presuming eth1 is the outward-facing device: iptables -A FORWARD -i eth1 -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT iptables -A FORWARD -i eth1 -j DROP iptables -I FORWARD -i eth1 -s ...


1

As pointed out by Big Chris above this can be solved using Synology's DDNS-feature. These are the steps I went through: If you have not already registred your NAS visit https://myds.synology.com and do so. On the NAS, navigate to the Control Panel > External Access and enter Synology as your service provider. Fill in the required information. If you have ...


1

Try the following command: $ systemctl stop firewalld.service sigh


1

I think you mean colour coded like If so, I don't think there is any official standard here, people choose colours and then decide how they are going to use them


1

IP Addresses are how any two computers talk to each other on most common networks. They're like the home address of the computer, so any network traffic that is to be delivered to that computer has to have the correct address. A computer with no address cannot have anything delivered to it, so to function on a network, you need an IP address.


1

Think of it this way: Your IP Address is like the address of your home. Your router is like your local post office. You give your post office letters to send to people as your computer gives your router requests that say what you want to access. The post office then sends your letter to the correct post office as your router processes your request and finds ...



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