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14

That's probably a 2.4GHz wireless mouse and you're probably using 2.4GHz Wi-Fi, so your mouse is probably interfering with your Wi-Fi signals. Try changing your TP-Link router's channel and the mouse system's channel so they don't overlap. Consider switching to 5GHz Wi-Fi or a wired USB mouse.


5

The "WAN" configuration of your Internet box is on the ISP's side, the Internet side of the box. Your computer however is on the "LAN" side, aka the home side of the box. Now, the default Gateway and DNS settings are two things completely different. Default Gateway (also called router): the device a computer will ask when it tries to reach a computer on ...


3

It is possible your ISP simply blocks the website speedtest.net. When doing a speedtest, it will download and upload lots of data as fast as it possibly can. This generates bandwidth. They may want to prevent you from doing so and redirect speedtest.net to their own site. It may also be that they do this because they know they cannot guarantee fast speeds ...


3

As posted in the comments, the computer was giving a Default Gateway conflict warning. This is where the computer is looking to get out to the internet. The Hamachi network is conflicting with the internal network. Disable this network then set the static IP.


3

I agree with Spiff's answer - but there may be a solution Have you tried waiting and letting the mouse and receiver (adapter) bind? It's likely that when you power the receiver on the laptop side, it goes into a bind mode and screams out for all to hear, until it finds a mouse. If it manages to find a mouse, interference may calm down enough for you to ...


2

For home high-speed internet service, at least in the United States, if only one speed number is quoted, it's usually just the download speed, not the sum of both directions. Service is often designed to be asymmetric, with upload speed often only a fraction (1/2 to 1/10th) of the download speed. However, it's not uncommon for fiber service to be symmetric....


2

It's the same thing, you can basically just rename the .ovpnfile into .confand move it into /etc/openvpn


2

Stuff like that of course isn’t listed in the specs. It wouldn’t be very good advertising if the manufacturer admitted its “Gigabit Router” could only actually route 200 Mbps. Then, there’s hardware acceleration: Most routers’ CPUs are just way to slow to handle the traffic. That’s why some sort of hardware acceleration is usually used to speed things up. ...


2

You need a wireless Ethernet bridge. Something like this. You should be able to find them cheaper if you look around. These bridges turn a wired Ethernet device into a wireless device.


2

Whether you use robocopy of Windows Explorer doesn't matter. The computer you run the command on always acts as middle-man in the transfer and all traffic passes through that computer. So yes: It would be much more efficient to push the files from the remote server to the remote clients. That way all traffic stays on the remote site.


2

IP subnets exist to allow routers to choose appropriate destinations for packets. You can use IP subnets to break up larger networks for logical reasons (firewalling, etc), or physical need (smaller broadcast domains, etc). Simply put, though, IP routers use your IP subnets to make routing decisions. Understand how those decisions work, and you can ...


1

Any part of a server can be made redundant, but there can be significant tradeoffs which might be deal-breakers - depending on what you are doing - The biggest one in many cases is redundant sites - even if you have 2 PC's if they are situated far from each other, latency can play havock with your IO. Getting into the devices - You can't really make ...


1

By default the Guest runs using a NAT network, meaning that it is secured to not let anything get out unless you make it possible. A virus can always come in the Guest, but it will then be contained inside the guest. However, for a virus to reach the guest, you will need to do something that will get the virus in there, such as run malicious code. (like ...


1

You'll need to first disable the Sharing settings under System Preferences -> Sharing and turn them off on the left by unchecking them which will automatically remove them from the Firewall allowed list.


1

You've done your dev all wrong if you're testing with "localhost" rather than a named-based virtual host setup where you can create your own (real) dummy domain and you can then configure your guests/LAN machines to point your dummy domain to the webserver IP via the HOSTS or DNS which will mean no matter what machine you use whenever you go to your dummy ...


1

If it is possible **, you simply need to setup bridge networking to virtual interfaces. VMWare comes with bridging when installed. You just need to configure the VM's to use it on the primary ethernet adapter connected directly to the physical switch. ** This may not be possible if your ISP limits the number of IP addresses to one per port (not common). ...


1

Try wuauclt /resetauthorization /detectnow If that doesn't work, try REG DELETE "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WindowsUpdate" /v SusClientId /f REG DELETE "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WindowsUpdate" /v SusClientIdValidation /f Then wuauclt /resetauthorization /detectnow


1

Using sed and bash $ printf '%d.%d.%d.%d\n' $(echo 80D00297 | sed 's/../0x& /g') 128.208.2.151 How it works: sed is used to reformat the number: $ echo 80D00297 | sed 's/../0x& /g' 0x80 0xD0 0x02 0x97 The %d format of printf is used to convert the hex numbers to decimal. Using GNU awk $ echo 80D00297 | gawk --non-decimal-data '{for (i=1;i&...


1

Presuming you mean convert it to a string or dotted-notation representation The first thing you need to know is whether the address is in network byte order, or host byte order. Network byte order is big-endian, whereas intel-based computers are little-endian. You can convert one to the other using a function called ntohl, which basically takes each byte (...


1

Minetest wiki states, that you need to enable forwarding for both UDP and TCP packets. This could be your problem. If it doesn't help do following: First debug the connection from different computer on your local network. Connecting to your local IP from same machine doesn't do the job - this communication is automatically routed through the loopback ...


1

Assuming you have an "off-the-shelf" home router rather then something serious which allows you a lot of control of the DHCP server, you should be able to find the range of IP's allocated in the router - usually this will be a small subset of the available IP's available for the subnet. You should be able to change this subset, save, restart everything as ...


1

It's not uncommon for an ISP to have multiple upstream connections, and partition traffic over the different connections based on any number of factors, such as the destination, time of day etc. So it's possible that one of their links went down and they didn't fail the rest of the traffic over to another link (or can't). The ISP should have a status page ...


1

Not all devices respond to pings. It's not required by any protocol. In fact, pings use a separate protocol from normal traffic. When you're connecting to your device and using it, you're almost certainly using either TCP or UDP, but pinging uses ICMP, specifically, control messages 8 (echo request) and 0 (echo reply). ICMP isn't built on any Layer 4 ...


1

I was wondering that whether all the data in Computer has to go through the Processor or are there any Bypass Routes(like DMA) through which data goes Input/output (I/O) is almost always between the peripheral device and memory. Peripheral to peripheral transfers are highly unusual, as it requires specialized hardware, and makes error detection/recovery ...


1

For case 1 and 2, the data goes via the CPU. Consider the following: The crane is unable to move a crate onto or off the truck without the crate going via the crane in the process. For a CPU to write something, it'll somewhere along the way read the data first. Case 3 is a bit different: In this case, the GPU can read it, as it does the job itself, but only ...


1

In short: no. But you can use local IP-adresses instead of the localhost. (Which refers to the local adresses as you can see from the file itself.) There may be a solution over on github, which may work (didn't try or build it myself.) https://gist.github.com/exupero/3228103


1

The problem is most likely an MTU issue. Try setting the MTU on your network interface smaller and/or add an IPTables line to do MTU clamping. Whats probably happening is that somewhere along the line, your default 1500 byte MTU is proving too big to be transmitted - normally thanks to a VPN or VLAN or similar encapsulation of frames. Generally an MTU of ...


1

The access point setting would not disable dhcp and other settings. It just telling the router to set it's wireless module in a mode which can accept wireless connections from clients. I also took a look of the manual for Netgear DGN2200 and I couldn't see the suggestion for LAN to WAN connection, so I think you got that a little bit wrong. By connecting the ...


1

Zoredache has put you on the right track. The details of the answer are as follows: Leave the VPN as is, this will setup the default routing table called main; Now we setup a second routing table, for the packets that must not pass thru the VPN. We call the new routing table novpn (not a major flight of fancy there, I agree): echo 200 novpn >> /etc/...


1

Cat7 is pointless for Ethernet since it has not been ratified by TIA/EIA. Cat7 has been designed as a standard for Gigabit Ethernet over 100m of copper cabling The cable contains four twisted copper wire pairs, just like the earlier standards. Cat7 can be terminated either with 8P8C compatible GG45 electrical connectors which incorporate the 8P8C standard or ...



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