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132

This happens if the file is so small that its contents and the filesystem bookkeeping fit in 1KB. To save disk space, NTFS keeps small files "resident", storing their contents right in the file record, so no cluster has to be allocated for it. Therefore, the size on disk is zero because there's nothing beyond the file record. Once the file gets sufficiently ...


7

The existing answer is correct in that the EFS private key is protected by the user's password. However, it is possible to configure EFS Data Recovery Agents that can decrypt any EFS-encrypted file on a system. DRA certificates are set via Group Policy, or Local Security Policy if you don't have a domain. DRAs have such access because when a system receives ...


3

Depending on the tablet you're using, it might be able to read exFAT. This is an extended version of the FAT-filesystem, that allows single files >4 GB. Simply try to format the card from your pc, then plug it in the tablet and see if it is readable.


2

No single user account or group has full access to everything. You would need to change the permissions of all files and folders to add full access for this new group. Danger! Blowing away the standard permissions is a great way to cause difficult system problems; you shouldn't do that. If you're trying to back up and restore files, you should use an actual ...


2

No, the unix find command doesn't know anything about ADS. The ntfs-3g driver at least knows about them. If they are indeed mapped to extended attributes on Linux, you should be able to list them with lsattr. Probably there are the more stricter kernel limits in place for the size of the attributes, so you might not be able to get all the data this way. You ...


2

I suspect that your installer is not booting with EFI. In order to install Windows onto GPT disks, you have to boot the installer using EFI. EFI booting (and the related "CSM" boot options) are complex enough to write a book about, but the massively abbreviated version relevant to this discussion is that a Windows installer disc (or USB disk, etc.) can be ...


2

No, you cannot truly hide a file or folder on a standard file system. By definition if it is on a filesystem, it can be accessed via that filesystem. Wise Folder Hider doesn't really hide anything. It just renames folders to something incomprehensible. The folders are still there, and can still be read by any application that doesn't baulk at the sight of ...


2

Actually, junctions have been around since Windows 2000; it's symbolic links that appeared in Vista. (Well, strictly speaking, they appeared in XP, but ntfs.sys didn't expose the functionality until Vista.) Neither junctions nor symbolic links are similar to hard links; both of the former are represented as different file system objects, while hard links are ...


2

There is no way to exactly copy NTFS files, passing through Linux. Even Wine, the Windows-compatibility layer on Linux, works by converting permissions back-and-forth between Linux and Windows, and so is limited to their (rather small) least common denominator. The only solution I can see is running Windows on Linux inside a virtual machine (or physical). ...


2

It looks like you have managed to format the entire device as one partition, without any partition table. This is entirely legit (your phone is using it just fine), but software that expects every disk to have a partition table may "freak out" and refuse to touch the device. Basically, all you need to do is to convince your computer to recreate the ...


2

I believe Windows cannot read HFS+ partitions, so you'll look for 3rd parties utilities to format your MicroSD. I'd like to suggest using MiniTool Partition Wizard http://www.partitionwizard.com/free-partition-manager.html. It helped me overcome many difficulties that occur with Windows partition utility. Format your deficient MicroSD using the Format and ...


1

Linux can copy NTFS files contents fine, just not all the modified/created/accessed dates & attributes (I'm assuming that's what you want preserved). So why don't you just make note of the current dates & attributes (dir should be able to display them), then copy the files in linux, and once you're running Windows again change the dates & ...


1

With the stock firmware, I don't believe there will be a way to do this. A couple of reviews for your router make it sound like that's just the behaviour and there's not much that can be done about it: You can't control the way the router streams or shares data stored on the connected USB storage device, either. Once plugged in, the entire drive is ...


1

Run Office on safe mode (/safe) to eliminate the possibilities of errant add ons. Another possibilities will be if the files are saved on the same partition as Office & Windows system files, where the file is originally created on a temporary folder (which somehow disallow compression) and moved afterwards (moving on the same partition won't change ...


1

AOMEI Partition Assistant can help you convert NTFS to FAT32 without data loss. But also if you have any file larger than 4GB, the conversion will not be realized since FAT32 doesn't support.


1

NTFS is still evolving and changing. I believe that the changes to the handling of inherited permissions has first appeared in Vista and has further evolved in Windows 7. The registry setting in your link dates from XP, so as far as I know it is ignored in newer versions. To understand what happens when one copies/moves a file, one must first understand the ...



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