Hot answers tagged

17

Windows decompresses files into memory. Doing it onto disk would completely obliterate any speed improvements and would cause a lot of unnecessary disk writing. See the end of this Microsoft blog article on NTFS sparse files and compression: NTFS determines which compression unit is being accessed. The compression unit’s entire allocated range is ...


2

So from the discussion in the comments I gather these are your goals: Add 240 GiB to sda2, the Windows partition Add 90 GiB to sda6, the Linux partition Currently, the disk is in an illegal (sort-of) state, though most operating systems will tolerate it: The extended partition is followed by another partition both physically (obvious from image) and ...


2

The basic problem is the extended partition /dev/sda3. There are several things you can do:- You should be able to extend /dev/sda3 to fill the currently unallocated space: you will probably need to do this by booting a LiveCD. You can then move the swap partition /dev/sda5 to the end of the extended partition (though it will be quicker to delete and ...


2

It depends on which kind of journaling you're interested in - NTFS has two. One kind keeps track of changes to the NTFS metadata (file system data structures), like where files start and end, or where there's free space. That information is stored in an invisible file (a "metafile") called $LogFile. This kind of journaling is very important if there's any ...


2

The easiest way to run some commands as SYSTEM is to use psexec in an elevated PowerShell session: psexec -s -i -accepteula powershell.exe This should open a new PowerShell window that runs as system whoami shows: nt authority\system


1

If you're setting the owner of an object to the Administrators group, you have to be a local administrator. Otherwise, people could trivially circumvent disk quotas, since the quota accounting is based on file ownership and quotas don't affect admins. If you are running the script as an administrator, you can set the owner of an object to any security ...


1

There might be some hidden partitions on the drive. I don't know what exactly happened while you were formatting it for Mac (which caused them to be hidden) but you can recover all the space in a few seconds. Plug in the drive on a Windows PC. Open Command Prompt as Administrator. Type diskpart to open the utility. Type list disk to list the connected ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible