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Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime Now, let us learn to do this for free. Before we start. Make sure your external name label is ONE word. That means there is no space in between. my disk = WRONG my_disk or my-disk or mydisk = CORRECT Now Open Terminal [Command+Space+"terminal"] ...


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As someone who has used TestDisk to recover a corrupted partition table, I would highly recommend it. First of all, it is in your best interest to not utilize the disk until you have performed recovery. This is to reduce the possibility of overwriting data on the disk which you will be attempting to recover. Also, I would recommend reading through the ...


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After doing some research, I found out that Test Disk recreates the partition tables of many disk formats, which work when a drive is deleted. You have to choose the Intel partition format. If Linux file systems were previously residing, they too will be recovered, but you can delete and merge them with EaseUs partition manager. If you have any problems, ...


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Download Gparted or Aomei. Move your G, F and E partitions across your unallocated space. Now your unallocated space will be next to your C partition. After this you may be able to extend C partition either by the downloaded 3rd party or your disk manager.


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I would try using GParted, the Windows version to see if you can move some of the unallocated space to the C:. It's fairly easy to use.


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There is also the option of booting with a Linux live cd (as opposed to installing as dual boot) and renaming the files. That's probably the quickes/easiest imo.


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According to a similar question from StackOverflow there are a couple things you can do. Quoting from the highest rated answer (not the accepted) the best method of doing such as task is: The best I've found is a two line batch file with a first pass to delete files and outputs to nul to avoid the overhead of writing to screen for every singe file. A ...


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Try this: Start > Run > cmd > cd to desired directory once in desired directory or parent directory type del (example) C:\Users\username\Desktop*desiredfile.ext This will delete files without confirmation.


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Windows NT 6.x cannot be installed to a FAT or FAT32 partition, because they make extensive use of advanced features of the NTFS filesystem, like hard links and junctions. Besides, allowing users to install to FAT/FAT32 in previous versions provided a false sense of security, since these filesystems do not support access control. Remember that one of the ...


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Windows Vista and higher won't install to FAT32, and can only be installed to an NTFS partition. This is probably due to the use of symlinks, which is not supported in FAT32. As for copying files, thats a no. Windows needs to be installed in order for the installer to configure your boot order properly. Just copying files won't do it.


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You can't install windows on a FAT partition. You shouldn't use a FAT partition for your Windows install. You can use a program like AOMEI partition manager to create a new partition, but you can't delete your existing partition.


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First of all, check all your drives to see if the folder has accidentally been moved to another drive (I see this all too often with people using drag-and-drop without realizing it). If you are certain that the files are gone, there are a lot of free file recovery tools that you can try. Have a look at majorgeeks.com for example ...


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Short answer No, it's not possible at this time. Long answer Files and folders1 are compressed and decompressed by passing a FSCTL_SET_COMPRESSION control code and a compression state to the DeviceIoControl API function. The compression state can be one of the following: COMPRESSION_FORMAT_NONE = 0 COMPRESSION_FORMAT_DEFAULT = 1 COMPRESSION_FORMAT_LZNT1 ...


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I would advise to use an archiver such as 7-zip or Winrar for this purpose. With Winrar, it is even possible to access a file that is inside an archiver. Do note that it will first extract the entire archive before it can access the file, and it will update the archive with modifications when you close and save to the file. This can make the entire process ...


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If you can't get it from backup, I recommend SpinRite at GRC.com for $89 USD. Written by Security Now's Steve Gibson, SpinRite can be used on any operating system and any file system. This means it can run on drives formatted with Windows XP's/Vista's/Windows 7's NTFS and all other older FAT formats (in addition to all Linux, Novell, and all other file ...


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You have to preserve the access time with tar at the moment you create your archive, option --atime-preserve EDIT: This only preserves the access time on the original file because when tar reads files, it updates atime! You are right... There doesn't seem to be a possibility to do this. If you need to preserve your atime, you can always use dd instead of ...


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Try using Gparted software to fix your hard drive. Try either the live dvd or the software which can be found in software center. http://gparted.org/


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I had the same problem copying install.wim to USB flash drive (I tried several), so I changed the cluster size. Right Click the drive, under USB, select Format, then change cluster size from 4096 (default) to 16 Kilobytes, and try to copy install.wim again.


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#Solved In Linux i could not do anything. On Windows 7 laptop i have plugged my hard drive and pop up comes for scan and fix or Continue without scanning I have clicked on scan and fix and then wait until it get finished. After that i can see all my corrupted files and folders.


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Found a better answer on technet: Simple: click the "hide" box only in Desktop folder (In Windows Classic view,) go to Windows Explorer; click on Desktop. Go to Tools/Folder Options. Click View, and check "Hide protected operating system files" - but, DO NOT CLICK "APPLY TO ALL FOLDERS". Just click OK. Now, only the Desktop folder will hide the files but ...


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How I solved my problem was by this: adding permissions to my options, making my /etc/fstab entry like this: UUID=<uuid> /os ntfs-3g hide_hid_files,hide_dot_files,windows_names,no_def_opts,big_writes,permissions 0 0 For those of you who are curious, here's my reasoning. The permissions option uses standard access control, while the acl option ...


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For anyone, like myself, who runs into this, for whatever reason, use the /V switch to enable the verbose mode. You will see the point at which your failure occurs. For me, it was a few empty files that it choked on. I moved them off the drive until it completed, then I moved them back. Also, try the /NoSecurity and /X switches, as well. Since many ...


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GParted would be able to do that. You could boot from a GParted LiveCD or a GParted LiveUSB.


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The user's EFS private key, as well as various other private data kept by Windows, is encrypted using the user's password. If the password is changed, it is impossible to decrypt the private keys, and without that, it is impossible to access the encrypted files.



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