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You can solve the puzzle in WinDbg. Just start any program and attach to it. Then, write your data somewhere into memory: 0:001> eq 7731000c 5FBF60C54F2CCF01 and interpret it as ole32!FILETIME 0:001> dt ole32!FILETIME 7731000c Feb 20 16:57:50 23464 +0x000 dwLowDateTime : 0x4f2ccf01 +0x004 dwHighDateTime : 0x5fbf60c5 As you can ...


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Running chkdsk /f on the drive a Windows 7 machine resulted in some repairs. Now rsync runs without problems.


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Se here. ("Interpretation of NTFS Timestamps", from forensicfocus.com) NTFS file timestamps, according to the documentation of the ‘FILETIME’ data structure in the Windows Software Development Toolkit, is a “64-bit value representing the number of 100-nanosecond intervals since January 1, 1601 (UTC)”. Conversion from this internal format to a ...


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If you format the drive data recovery won't be faster. If you are sure that the original problem is with a corrupted NTFS table you could try using some kind of partition recovery software. However the best option is such cases it to use the services of a data recovery company. Data recovery is not an easy process and if you aren't a 100% sure what and why ...


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Data recovery on large volume drives can be such an agony especially if you are using window's tools to recover the same drive that windows is unable to read. I have had success recovering similar raw and unrecognized drives using linux distros as well. My suggestion: Download Ultimate Boot CD, make a bootable USB or CD of it. Boot from it and launch Parted ...


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It has nothing to do with your set Event Log size. considering a nearly full 2TB disk with 800k files in 20k folders? From Microsoft: CHKDSK was unable to adjust the size of the log file. Explanation: There is not enough space to increase the size of the log file, or Chkdsk encountered file system corruption on a clean volume. User Action: Delete ...


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Don't know about negative effects, but some of these answers are just plain wrong (namely, ChrisF's and Synetech's). Proof: my desktop's desktop.ini file, for instance, has different timestamps for all entries (created, modified and accessed), while other files in the same folder have either the same timestamps for all entries, or just for 2 entries ...


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Data recovery can take a while, although I've never seen a hard drive have to take that long to be read from and repair. What kind of state is the drive in, is it making noises, does it report bad sectors, what happened to it to make the NTFS table corrupt? I'd start by using a tool such as ddrescue (packaged in linux as gddrescue) and imaging the drive to ...


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Data recovery takes a long time, especially if we're talking about a lot of data, and extra-especially if the drive is faulty/damaged. :) All recovery programs will take about the same amount of time to do the same job. Formatting the drive will only make it harder to recover data (since every time you write to the drive you most-likely overwrite some of ...


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You cannot store 5 billion files. The maximum number of files on a single disk is 4,294,967,295. This can be in one folder or many. You might be able to "cheat" by mounting another drive as a folder. However, I dont know if this would work. Anyways, that many files would make working with a folder with that many files... really difficult.


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The sectors of your disk are like this: 0123456789 First time you got number 5. Second time maybe number 4 o 6. And so on! Your disk is going bad: backup all data and replace it. Never trust a disk with bad sectors!


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Found a solution! I had to run ntfsfix on the disk using: ntfsfix /dev/loop0 And then it mounted just fine!


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You can't use EXT4 for Windows based systems, you will need to partition the drive into 2 or more partitions, Windows will install on NTFS partitions, these will be created during the installation process, at that time you can specify the size of the partition at the time of install. Linux install after Windows installation will look at the current ...


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My first starting point is usually the /proc file system: # cat /proc/partitions major minor #blocks name 2 0 4 fd0 8 0 58615704 sda 8 1 102400 sda1 8 2 25600000 sda2 8 3 5120000 sda3 8 4 27791360 sda4 8 16 488386584 sdb 8 17 488385536 sdb1 Often you ...


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The particular device you need to mount will vary depending on how the machine is set up, both based on what kind of drive it is and how it is partitioned. It's probably of the format /dev/sda1, where "a" changes for different disks, and the number changes for different partitions on the disk. You can just try and see what it will successfully mount as ntfs ...


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Never trust a failing drive with data you care about. Your drive is failing. By the time chkdsk starts reporting bad sectors, your drive has exhausted all of the reserve sectors it came from the factory with to deal with the small number of "normal" sector failures that occur in otherwise healthy drives. However, once the reserves are depleted, trouble is ...


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chkbit is a lightweight bitrot detection tool (OS X/Linux/Windows). chkbit cannot repair bitrot, its job is simply to detect it. You should backup regularly. run chkbit before each backup. check for bitrot on the backup media. in case of bitrot restore from a checked backup.


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I had a similar problem and my solution may work for you. I tried to rename the last 4 episodes in a folder and I was getting the message: "A file name cannot contain any of the following characters. \/:*?<>| The weird thing is I had 12 Episodes within this file and the first 8 of which I had no problem adding a "#" to the end of the episode name ...


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It looks to me you have at least four choices - there are probably more. The last choice is forget about it, but we'll come to that. The first choice is to decide if you want to go the professional data recovery service way, the price could be as low as 300 US when you are fortunate enough to have the HDD crash just the right way - or it is healthy but the ...


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Thanks to @optichip for the help! he definitely pointed me in the right direction. This was the command I was looking for: icacls "C:\MyPath" /reset /T /C


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icacls "C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Media Player" /grant Administrators:(OI)(CI)M icacls "C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Media Player\*" /grant Administrators:(OI)(CI)M This will set Modify on the folder, and it will also push Administrators group down into the folders underneath it. You can get more command information doing icacls /? from the command ...


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That Temp folder is about as close to a free-for-all as you're going to get on Windows. By default the "Users" group of the PC have full control of it, so you can't trust it to be in any expected state. The only answer is to alter your installer to ensure it's applying the permissions it needs to the folders it's creating, instead of depending on (possibly ...


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"We should backup our important files to something else like shared server, LAN, cloud storage not limit on the disk. As long as the data isn't overwritten, your files should be still in disk. As Maudam said, try EaseUS Data Recovery. "


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I didn't succeed with ntfsclone, but I did with dd. Here's what I did, in case it may be useful. Old drive is /dev/sda, 640GB; new drive is a 120GB ssd in /dev/sdb/. I had 3 partitions, one 15GB recovery, one 100MB boot partition and the system (mounted on C: in windows). First step is to get all start/end sectors of the old disk: root@sysresccd /root % ...


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Most likely you have two options -- pay for a data recovery service (typical 2014 cost $100 to $200 for the attempt, no guarantee you get anything back), or obtain and learn to use a "forensic file recovery" package. I've used one of those, several years ago, to recover data from a hard disk with head impact damage (computer fell about 1.5 meters on ...



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