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Solution is one of the folder in the hierarchy didnt have execute permission


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The Junction Points were suppose to be created in the opposite direction D:\Downloads\Junction\junction.exe C:\Sandbox\ D:\Temp\Sandbox\ so that all of the files writing to C: will go to D: instead


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You point out disk usage as video and music. Majority data file sizes then should be 2MB+ for music and 100MB+ for video, some playlist (less then 5% of overall file quantity) of few kB. You point out the device is external USB disk. The best solution for such specification is exfat(vfat on linux) or NTFS with 64kB block/allocation unit size. Some hints ...


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I found that junction points just creates a second location where files are written to and not the expected effect of moving the write location to a different place. They do move the writes. Which means, they move reads as well. So when Chromium tries to write to the old location, it actually writes to the old one – likewise, when you look in the ...


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It's worth noting that Microsoft now has ReFS (resilient file system) on Windows 2012+ and Windows 8.1, which does check integrity. Furthermore, if you run ReFS on a mirrored storage space, it can automatically correct those errors by using bits from the other side of the mirror. ReFS doesn't support all the features of NTFS, so you'll have to decide if ...


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You can always manually compute checksums with md5sum and check them periodically, or you can use btrfs, which has an online checksumming feature. On the other hand, it really is kind of redundant and unnecessary since disk drives already have their own error detecting and correcting codes.


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I've seen this before, I'm not sure why this happens though, but anyway to fix it, try this: Download and install HDD LLF Tool: http://hddguru.com/software/HDD-LLF-Low-Level-Format-Tool/ Run it with admin rights, and do a low level format of the HDD. After that go to Windows Disk Management and format the HDD as NTFS with it's default allocation unit.


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I’ve researched dealing with this issue for fairly large—20TB+—enterprise-sized storage systems and the consumer reality is this: ZFS based systems is really the only way to deal with this. If data rot is a real concern, then I would recommend having at least one other hard drive for backups that you backup. Not RAID or anything magical, but simply another ...


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Firstly I'm going to second what vembutech advises. I have seen a couple of situations where formatting once more solved issues not unlike yours. If that doesn't work: Are you using 3rd party software to move files? For example, Explorer++, Cubic Explorer, MultiCommander? If so, try moving the files using Microsoft's built in Windows Explorer. It is also ...


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From the information you have posted I suspect that the drive might not formatted properly. To check the file system of the volume, open command prompt run the command open Diskpartand then run list volume, this command will show you the files system of the volume. If the volume is NTFS try to format the drive once again and try to copy the files.


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to solve that issue goto local disk C then search for (desktop.ini) then when the search is done press (Ctrl+A) to select all the file of desktop.ini then select view on the top or press (Alt) then navigate to view then select (Hide selected items). You are now done


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A previous post was on the right track with the reference provided: perhaps check here for ideas on what could be causing it. http://www.tuxera.com/community/ntfs-3g-faq/#slow The original question mentions noticing the issue with large file transfers. In my experience with copying media files or doing backups, the key option in the above FAQ was: ...


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Having recently researched a similar problem, I can also say that a compressed file takes at least 4 kilobytes of space per file, and a temporary space of 64 kilobytes, which is the size of one "Compression Unit" for NTFS with 4kb cluster size. The article on blogs.msdn.com also mentions that when the file is compressed, the disk space is allocated to hold ...


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When looking at your files, in Explorer, click view on the menu bar and select details. To change the details displayed, on the View menu, click Choose Details. In the Choose Details dialog box, click to select or clear the items you want to view: ...


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This is normal that mac wont allow you to connect the ntfs file system drive in write mode. By default it will attach it in read only mode and this is the reason that restricts you from copying you in to ntfs file system drive. If possible reformat it to fat32 and try copying the data or Google around to crack the restriction to allow Ntfs write. Where you ...


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You can set the HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\kernel\ dword:ObCaseInsensitive registry value to 0 as other authors suggested, and use Cygwin to work with case-sensitive filenames. In order to do so, you need to mount NTFS filesystems with posix=1 option in your /etc/fstab, as this article suggests. Here's a snippet from my fstab: ...


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Trash it, buy a new one. They are not worth fixing once they start to fail. I get through literally hundreds of them for work, with 'write few, read many' deploys - fail rates are high. Caveat: don't use SD for mission-critical storage.



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