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15

I have had success with the BSD-licensed Linux port of Cuneiform OCR system. No binary packages seem to be available, so you need to build it from source. Be sure to have the ImageMagick C++ libraries installed to have support for essentially any input image format (otherwise it will only accept BMP). While it appears to be essentially undocumented apart ...


13

There are several online utilities can be used to identify fonts, including: WhatTheFont!, which can automatically match a font in an image you submit to the closest matches in the database; Identifont and Fonts.com Identify Fonts by Sight, where you specify the appearance of the characters in the font to identify the font. These utilities cannot be ...


13

Evernote API has functionality to get text and rectangle where this text is present inside the image. See http://evernote.com/about/developer/api/evernote-api.htm, check out "Evernote Recognition Index XML Format" and functions to retrieve it. Problem is that they don't do traditional OCR ... their OCR algorithm may produce different words for single "word" ...


11

Also, Evernote apparently doesn't decide a particular image is equivalent to exactly one word - e.g., Evernote doesn't determine that a particular image is "clue" and is not "due". Rather, it will track both, and a search for either would return the same image. Hence, there's no way to get a full-text equivalent because Evernote isn't deciding what the full ...


11

From the MS TechNet site - Changes in Word 2010: Microsoft Office Document Imaging (MODI) MODI provided a common document imaging and scanning solution for Office. It was also the basis of the Fax feature for Office. When MODI was installed, it was the default handler for .tif, .tiff, and .mdi files. In Office 2010, MODI is fully ...


9

See if pdftotext will work for you. If it's not on your machine, you'll have to install the poppler-utils package sudo apt-get install poppler-utils You might also find the pdf toolkit of use. A full list of pdf software here on wikipedia. Edit: Since you do need OCR capabilities, I think you'll have to try a different tack. (i.e I couldn't find a ...


7

When I researched this topic a while ago there wasn't any free software for any platform that produced reasonable quality output. The Optical character recognition article at Wikipedia lists the following free OCR applications: CuneiForm GOCR Ocrad HOCR SimpleOCR Tesseract I only tried gocr from these, it has no gui and the qualitiy of its output is ...


7

OCR works by analysing the shape of the letters. It's more likely to confuse the letter "l" and the numeral "1" for example as they are very similar in shape. Lower case "t" and upper case "T" are more different, so as long the letters are clear enough I wouldn't have thought so. Have you got an example where it's done this?


6

I found this an interesting problem and had a closer look... First, I used the qpdf commandline tool to un-compress PDF data streams so I could better see the source codes of both files: qpdf.exe ^ --qdf ^ from_abbyy.pdf ^ qdf--from_abbyy.pdf qpdf.exe ^ --qdf ^ after_ghostscript.pdf ^ qdf--after_ghostscript.pdf Looking at one ...


6

Not really. Handwriting recognition is a hard problem and the failure to crack this was one of the key reasons that the Apple Newton failed. Palm had to make a pseudo-script called 'Graffiti' in order to recognize it, and that was done one letter at a time on a special pad, rather than written as a script. You could try an OCR program - it might work, but ...


6

I came across this on Lifehacker quite some time back, and it has been one of my top DIY projects ever since. Replace the iPhone with any camera or imaging, and you get a stack of nice high-res jpegs ready for you to OCR with any software, even (urks!) MS Office... ;) Cheap. Effective. DIY. You can't beat an idea like this. EDIT: Comments raised up some ...


5

I have earlier posted an answer detailing how to use Cuneiform (open source software) to do OCR on PDF files and how to create a PDF file with the recognized text in a hidden text layer "behind" the original image. As far as I know, Cuneiform actually does support Romanian as well. While the particular solution was for Linux, Cuneiform is available also for ...


5

Google docs will now use OCR to convert your uploaded image/pdf documents to text. I have had good success with it. They are using the OCR system that is used for the gigantic Google Books project. However, it must be noted that only PDFs to a size of 2 MB will be accepted for processing.


5

evernote pays a decent sum to the creator of the ocr-stuff OR paid a decent sum to put something working together. thus, i really doubt that they will let you get the extracted text (+ positioning on the image). (could be a business model, to scan other peoples images and provide good ocr :)) so, the answer is: no.


5

I have installed the Acrobat 11 (XI) trial in VirtualBox. Acrobat 11 is single threaded. I have also made an external script that starts multiple Acrobat instances (one per CPU core), parallel processes the OCR job and merges the result. A crucial step is to turn on error logging in Acrobat preferences, parse all .log and reprocess any error files. The ...


4

If it's possible for you to sort the documents and photos, I would suggest a 256-color PNG for the documents (you can do this with IrfanView) without dithering, afterwards use PNG Optimizer on the results. If used on scanned documents, they will, without even resizing, shrink from ~20 MB bitmaps to ~400 KB pngs. I have no suggestion for the photos.


4

The latest version of k2pdfopt can either keep the OCR with native PDF output option (-mode 2col) or restore the OCR using its own OCR. Also, running the k2pdfopt output through Calibre, as some have suggested, is not necessary if you use the right settings in k2pdfopt. Edit: v2.x of k2pdfopt, released 3-Sep-2013, will preserve previously OCR'd text by ...


4

Office 2007 features Microsoft Office Document Imaging which, while it is not the best OCR software in the world, will at least be able to get back the majority of your documents. If it is not installed then you may need to reconfigure your office setup to add it in. On my system the tool is Found at Start -> Microsoft Office -> Microsoft Office ...


4

The following products were found listed on Internet, but I haven't used them. Online OCR OCR Terminal OCR Terminal is an online OCR service that performs Optical Character Recognition (OCR) on your scanned images and pdf files and renders them into editable and text searchable documents. Free OCR Free-OCR.com is a free online OCR ...


4

You could download the 30 day trial of Adobe Acrobat Pro and use the 'OCR Text Recognition' function ('Document > OCR Text Recognition > Recognise Text Using OCR...'). In the settings dialog, choose 'Searchable Image' as the output style. This will keep the page image but embed the OCR'ed text so the document will be searchable and allow text to be selected, ...


4

Never heard of any good free OCR for Mac :] There is GOCR, but it is rather crappy. From the low cost apps I would recommend VelOCRaptor. You can try it out for free.


4

There have been several other questions on SuperUser on OCR, which might be worth checking out for possible solutions. Most notably this answer by Molly looks promising: I really like TopOCR, certainly a great addition to your scan tools: Incredible OCR accuracy, upto 99.8% with a 3 MP camera No page limits, and no extra downloads or ...


4

Given that the OCR has converted: Als Arbeitsmarkbehörde ... to: AlsArbeitsmarktbeh6rde ... A couple of things spring to mind. Try scanning at a higher dpi. It looks like it can't recognise the space between the words, a higher dpi might improve that. Can you set the language of your OCR program? I see that it's converted the "ö" to a "6". ...


3

Unless you have a automated scanner, it would probably be quicker and less effort on your part to type the lotto numbers in by hand. If you do this a lot and want to justify your effort: Buy an automated scanner, with some sort of feeder. Hopefully scanner will dump all the scanned files into a destination folder. Run a script that will trigger OCR on ...


3

There is also another desktop solution: Find my Font (I'm the designer of this solution) It creates a database of all your local PC fonts (installed or not). It creates a index on this database: Recognition Speed is about 5.000.000 fonts/min At this speed you can search a database of 200-300.000 fonts in about 10-20 secs You can recognize fonts that are ...


3

I think Tesseract is the best (free) command-line based OCR software. Unfortunately there doesn't appear to be a Windows 7 64-bit binary available so you'd have to compile it yourself; here are the instructions for doing so (taken from a comment on the Tesseract FAQ page): Download tesseract 2.04. Unpack it. In this example I've unpacked to ...


3

I wouldn't even bother trying to do this - it would be quicker to recreate the table in Word, Excel or Publisher, or a similar open-source package. I think you would need specialist software to recover the original table from the image, and in my experience the results are always not good enough, so you spend as much time tweaking as you would have ...


3

I think ABBYY FineReader is the leading product in this category, though I don't know more details about it. There are also other programs, such as Ligature and readIRIS. There's some free programs too such as qhocr. You can check the details of these programs and try their free downloads. Otherwise, I would assume Bar-Ilan, HebrewBooks and Otzar haChochma ...



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