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11

First, get ffmpeg, then: For x264 encoded .mp4: ffmpeg -i INPUT -vcodec libx264 "OUTPUT.mp4" For VP8 .webm: ffmpeg -i "INPUT" -vcodec libvpx -acodec libvorbis -f webm "OUTPUT.webm" Here is a useful guide for encoding the video of the MP4.


8

There's several ways you can do this. Probably the easiest is to use a tool called ogg2mp3. Details on the Ubuntu forums about how do install it: $ sudo apt-get install mp32ogg lame $ wget ftp://ftp.pbone.net/mirror/plf.zarb.org/plf/mandrake/10.1/noarch/ogg2mp3-0.3-3plf.noarch.rpm $ sudo alien ogg2mp3-0.3-3plf.noarch.rpm $ sudo dpkg -i ogg2mp3_0.3-4_all.deb ...


7

Checkout the appropriately named Normalize: Normalize is a tool for adjusting the volume of audio files to a standard level. This is useful for things like creating mixed CD's and mp3 collections, where different recording levels on different albums can cause the volume to vary greatly from song to song. It works for all types of file formats, ...


7

You can use VLC media player, that will play almost anything. See http://www.videolan.org/vlc/.


6

You will need much more than a weekend if you plan to sleep. If you're lucky you might get 20 hours to spend on the CDs in a weekend, but you will be bored stiff. At that rate it will take 12 weekends to finish. You have a lot of CDs, so it's going to take a long time regardless. A relative of mine has several hundred burned CDs of music, which is much ...


6

If you install the package ubuntu-restricted-extra then you can rip to MP3 instead of Ogg Vorbis. Ubuntu doesn't ship with the MP3 encoder by default because of the legal minefield about who owns it.


6

As commented above, most audio players specify the bit rate at play time. Try VLC. EDIT: Well, not really at play time; you have to "CTRL+J" to see it. See below. @barlop Here are 2 screenshots: I guess, that's the bitrate?


5

Ogg Video Tools seems to do what you are looking for. Short description: Sometimes it would be nice to concatenate (join) two or more video files. For that you can use oggCat, which creates a continuous Ogg video file from the given files. # oggCat newFile.ogv file1.ogv file2.ogv [ file3.ogv [...] ] Note: The video files must correspond in ...


5

Transcoding from one lossy format (vorbis) to another (MP3) is not ideal, but unfortunately it is necessary sometimes, especially if one has an ageing audio device. The command-line tool avconv can do this well (ffmpeg uses identical syntax). avconv -i input.ogg -c:a libmp3lame -q:a 2 output.mp3 will give you a variable bit rate MP3: this means that the ...


5

Edit 1: I should mention that the tools I list below are not actually normalization tools, per se. They are tools for applying the replaygain algorithm to determine the music file's loudness and add a tag to the file indicating the relative loudness. The critical difference is that normalization actually involves re-encoding the audio data, whereas ...


4

Have you looked at MediaMonkey? I've just converted an mp3 to ogg (as I knew I had mp3's with meta data) and the meta data (Title, Artist, Genre, Album, Year, Track no.) got copied. I've also converted it back to mp3 and the meta data is preserved that way too. It will also do batch conversions. Just add your ogg files to the library, select them all and ...


4

I see people promoting SUPER quite often and I'm not sure why, when options such as Miro or plain old FFmpeg are available? To do this with ffmpeg just use this (simple) command: ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -acodec libvorbis -vcodec libtheora -f ogv output.ogv Miro: http://www.mirovideoconverter.com/


4

Here's my solution for the /usr/bin/vorbiscomment: Argument list too long problem. I created a script and named it oggart. Just run it from the command line like this: oggart /path/to/music_file.ogg /path/to/image_file This tags your ogg file with METADATA_BLOCK_PICTURE field. Easytag uses the old way of doing this with COVERART field instead of ...


4

Why not encode to FLAC (flac.sf.net)? Re-encoding to ogg (or whatever) as needed is pretty easy. Actually, it's not "OGG", it's "Vorbis" (Or Ogg Vorbis). Ogg is just the container. And Ogg Vorbis doesn't use ABR, it uses VBR, it just doesn't avertise it, since it's (unlike with (traditional?) mp3) the default. Which also means that "192" doesn't make ...


4

QuickTime Pro can export the audio from a .mov file. I know it can export as .wav, maybe .mp3 as well. You can also use VLC to export the audio from a .mov file on OS X. These directions reference the Windows version of VLC but should get you pretty close to how to do it on OS X.


4

From a Unix-like (Linux, OSX, etc) commandline, ffmpeg can be used like this: for f in *.wav; do ffmpeg -i "$f" -c:a libmp3lame -q:a 2 "${f/%wav/mp3}" -c:a libvorbis -q:a 4 "${f/%wav/ogg}"; done This will convert every WAV in a directory into one MP3 and one OGG; note that it's case-sensitive (the above command will convert every file ending in .wav, but ...


3

If you are that serious about getting good CD rips (and you use Windows) it's worth considering using Exact Audio Copy or dBPowerAMP with AccurateRip, rather than iTunes. As for the codec/bitrate, Hydrogen Audio have detailed info on each codec, including recommended encoder settings (e.g., for LAME).


3

No but - quoting from the feature list - [it] Can run external commands for the currently selected files (tag-editor for example). You can bind for example: bind common ^E run your-tag-editor {} So when you press Ctrl + e in the common context, cmus will open your-tag-editor expanding {} to the currently selected files.


3

MP3 is the safest bet. Lots of devices use AAC/M4A these days but it really depends on the device – nearly all the ones you mentioned would be able to play AAC for certain other than the Xbox: You can play MP3 files from your iPod on any Xbox 360 console. To listen to music stored in the Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) format, you need to download the free ...


3

On Debian, a quick search with aptitude showed me the packages mp32ogg and dir2ogg. Have a look, maybe they do what you need.


3

You can do this with ffmpeg and sox: for i in *.mp3 *.ogg *.flac do ffmpeg -i "$i" "$i.wav" done sox *.wav combined.wav


2

Ogg media plugin for Windows Media Player


2

I'm not aware of anything that does it automatically by just pointing to the image. However vorbiscomment can embed arbitrary tags, you just need to encode the image in base64 and then construct the tag in the correct format. e.g vorbiscomment -a -t 'METADATA_BLOCK_PICTURE=...' file.ogg newfile.ogg you'll have to hack these steps into a script of some ...


2

-q 6 is roughly 192kb You are specifying a variable bit rate for the ogg, and fixed bit rate for the m4a. While the variable bit rate is nominally 192kb, it is not guaranteed to be 192kb, and for especially complex music, it will be larger.


2

MP3 is a lossy format. Ogg Vorbis is a lossy format. Therefore you will get the best results by re-ripping the CDs (non-lossy format). Not familiar with Ogg tagging, but there is this: http://easytag.sourceforge.net/


2

SUPER is a gui frontend for ffmpeg, so it can convert mp4 into ogg.


2

You'll find the application Sound Converter in the menu under Sounds & Video Very easy to use GUI, does the job. To install Sound Converter search for it in the Ubuntu Software Center or open the terminal and run the command: sudo apt-get install soundconverter


2

SoX is the Swiss Army Knife of sound processing utilities http://sox.sourceforge.net/ for f in *.ogg; do sox "$f" "${f%.ogg}.mp3"; done its like vlc for audio files. It is so old it was ported to the Amiga in 1994.


2

Personally I rip all my CD's to flac ( free lossless audio codec ) which at the default level is not very demanding. I can easily rip a CD in 5 minutes. I use Easy CD extractor which I paid for about 13 years ago and I have had free updates since so I feel I have had good value from the software


2

ffmpeg (or more likely the fork avconv if you're using Debian or Ubuntu - these instructions should apply equally to both, though nobody knows how far apart they may drift in the future) should be in the repositories of your distro. ffmpeg -i input.mp3 -c:a libvorbis -q:a 4 output.ogg To do a whole directory full of MP3s: for f in ./*.mp3; do ffmpeg -i ...



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