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10

You are correct; Oracle is no longer contributing to OpenSolaris (reference). Oracle Solaris 11 Express releases more often than the standard build of Solaris and includes newer technologies. It may be used free of charge for development and testing, but not for production. Production use requires purchasing some form of Oracle Premier Support ...


8

Actually it's quite simple. You can use the following: screen -S sessionname -X stuff 'command'`echo -ne '\015'` echo -ne '\015' emulates pressing the Enter key. NOTE: that 'stuff' is a screen command. http://www.gnu.org/software/screen/manual/screen.html#Stuff


7

x86 is their way of stating it is for both the x86-32 and the x86-64 architectures; in other words, it supports both 32-bit and 64-bit in the same install package. According to this, it actually installs both kernels: If you choose Solaris, the system will boot the 32-bit kernel. If you choose Solaris 64-bit, it will choose the 64-bit kernel. ...


6

Some things you need to worry about are: The architecture. Pools created on x86 wont be importable by SPARC and reciprocally unless you are using whole disks (EFI labels) as vdevs instead of slices. The OpenSolaris release. If the destination server is using an older release of OpenSolaris, it will likely be impossible to successfuly import the pool and/or ...


6

The ZFS filesystem in OpenSolaris was the deciding factor over Linux/BSD for me when I recently built a file server. Some compelling ZFS features for me were: RAID-Z redundancy Data integrity checksums fundamental to the design Snapshots Simple command line tools Sure, ZFS can be bolted on to Linux with FUSE but in OpenSolaris it is standard and (so far ...


4

FreeBSD and OpenSolaris seem to be the best choices for hosting ZFS With OpenSolaris, ZFS is usually versions/features/bug-fixes ahead. OpenSolaris' hardware support is nowhere near as good as e.g. Ubuntu Hardware support is getting much better with recent OpenSolaris builds but as long as your hardware is supported that shouldn't really matter. ...


4

Use format to get a list of the available harddisks. rpools are special. Their disks must not have an EFI label. You can delete the EFI label with format/fdisk. You don't have to format the drive before adding it to a zpool. But in case of rpools you need to copy the partition layout from the first to the 2nd disk. The commands you've mentioned are correct ...


4

Both. Solaris 10 and later has both 32-bit and 64-bit binaries. On boot the CPU is detected and a 32-bit or 64-bit kernel is automatically chosen. When you run a program, similar detection occurs as to whether to use the 32-bit or 64-bit (if available) binary.


3

An update for mid-2012: OpenIndiana/Illumos (essentially a community fork of OpenSolaris) continues to use the same approach, but I found a few differences in the setup and a very useful tip from DAMIAN WOJSŁAW at http://trochejen.blogspot.com/2011/11/openindiana-and-ntfs-3g.html. The following recipe, which includes initial steps for identifying an ...


3

Based on the description of what you do, I would also recommend Ubuntu. There is little difference in the software available for Debian, gNewSence, & Ubuntu as they are all debian or debian branches. Personally, OpenSolaris would be my last choice, due to limitations on support and package availability. It uses a unique package management system. ...


3

That's it, assuming you exported the pool. If not, you'll need to force and export than import as normal.


2

Debian is also totally free. Ubuntu comes in a totally free flavor, for that matter. What gNewSense seems to do is make it hard to install non-free (as in freedom) software, where Debian and Ubuntu make it easy. Are you meaning "Free" (as in freedom) or "free" (as in free of charge)? None of them cost money. I'm deducing you're new to Unix-like operating ...


2

To install the non-free Adobe Flash Player under Debian you can follow these insructions: http://www.debianadmin.com/how-to-install-adobe-flash-in-debian-etchlennysid.html For QuickTime, you have several choices. Notably, you can install mozilla-plugin-vlc, xine-plugin, or mozilla-mplayer. Can't help you with OpenSolaris, but I suspect at least some of ...


2

If you want Flash on OpenSolaris, the easiest way to get it is to go to pkg.sun.com and sign up. That will get you access to a precompiled Flash which fits right in the Firefix Sun distributes. Thre reason it isn't in the default distribution is that Sun can not redistribute Flash.


2

If you're interested in ZFS, then you might want to try FreeBSD. The software selection is better than OpenSolaris.


2

Wait for Opensolaris 2010.04 to be released. You'll have the deduplication feature available, a more advanced OS than Solaris 10 (next Solaris release will be based on OpenSolaris) and an environment less disruptive than Solaris 10 as you are coming from Gnu/Linux. If you can't wait, just use the dev build 132, which is the latest 2010.04 beta. Although ...


2

You'll need the ntfs-3g driver just like on GNU/Linux systems. You can grab it here from sunfreepacks.com as ASntfs-3g-2009.4.4. Install the 3 packages on the top first though, GNUBase, ASgettext, and ASlibiconv-1.12. You can then mount them like so: pfexec ntfs-3g /dev/dsk/c5t0d0p1 ~/Desktop/mount Of course, change the disk and partition accordingly.


2

I'm quite sure it's a Finder issue. Indeed, you can access your share using a terminal or another file manager. To use Finder, you can try the solution reported here and here. It is a temporary fix, but it works as in any previous versions of OSX (i.e. it survives the sleep mode etc.). I recap the solution here for the sake of documentation. Mount CISF/SMB ...


2

Based on some testing I just did myself, the problem appears to be keys with sizes other than 2048 bits. When I generated a new key that was 2048 bits (the default), everything worked just fine.


2

Three days later, the zfs scrub is finished. No progress was indicated until about 24 hours into the process. # zpool status pool: foo state: ONLINE scan: scrub repaired 0 in 79h37m with 0 errors on Tue Nov 29 07:48:43 2011 config: NAME STATE READ WRITE CKSUM foo ONLINE 0 0 0 raidz1-0 ONLINE ...


2

You're going to have to tell one OS or the other not to automatically clobber the GRUB boot sector. All Linux distros that I've seen have some way to prevent their installation CD from clobbering the boot sector, but it's often in some obscure advanced option. The majority GRUB's configuration data is not stored in the very small boot sector, which just ...


1

The last time I set up a dual boot system (before the days of virtual machines as in the previous person's answer), it used to give you the option of making a boot floppy. This was useful, because then after you installed another OS and it wrote all over the Master Boot Record, you could boot from the floppy, set up Grub to chain load the other OSes, and ...


1

Try passing -vvv to ssh and read more detailed debug information.


1

The "pool" size of a RAID-Z is the entire physical space available to the pool - not the space for a filesystem. For that you should examine the "zfs list" command. # zpool list NAME SIZE ALLOC FREE CAP DEDUP HEALTH ALTROOT storage 5.32T 2.23T 3.09T 41% 1.00x ONLINE - # zfs list NAME USED AVAIL REFER ...


1

RAID 4 uses a dedicated parity drive. RAID 5 stripes the parity.


1

To mount ntfs: # /usr/lib/fs/fuse/mount -o subtype=ntfs-3g /dev/dsk/cXdYpZ /export/ntfs To unmount ntfs: # fusermount -u /export/ntfs


1

Is the source directory hierarchy being used by something while you are doing the copy? I was able to elicit that error message (and some others) when I give it pathnames that do not exist: % ls foo bar baz ls: bar: No such file or directory ls: foo: No such file or directory baz !1% # Only baz exists. !1% printf %s\\\\n foo bar baz | cpio -odm > ...



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