Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

24

Most standard Linux distros will allow you to do this - provided they are the same architecture (eg Both are Intel 32bit or 64bit machines). Linux typically packs all the common drivers you might need as modules as part of the intitial boot process, and there is no "system lock in" to check if the hardware is the same as previous boots. I have, on ...


15

Of the several reasons this cannot work with Windows that come to mind, the most pressing and impossible to work around is Windows Product Activation. Every time you move your Windows installation to new hardware you will trigger product activation. Very soon you will run out of grace re-activations and have to call Microsoft to get your product key ...


8

If I plug a line or USB microphone into my PC, I can record audio at 44.1kHz. That's one sample of audio about every 23 microseconds. The audio wave must be sampled and played back precisely or it will sound distorted. How do non-realtime OSes manage the very time-sensitive process of audio recording and playback with such high sample rates? Is the ...


4

They use I/O machine code instructions. You can search for I/O ports, I/O devices, you'll find lots of things, for example: The basic concept is that, the same way you can read or write to/from memory, fom registers, you can do that with devices also. Of course, you have to have documentation from the device manufacturer (or BE the manufacturer ...


4

It depends on the hardware.  Some systems/devices use port-mapped I/O (PMIO), as described by pgr; others use memory-mapped I/O (MMIO).  In memory-mapped I/O, special instructions like “IN” and “OUT” are not used.  Instead, the driver uses ordinary instructions like “MOV” and other instructions that are commonly used for accessing memory. Every device is ...


4

Personally I tend to start with a vanilla windows disk, and a set of updates I get from microsoft using wsus offline update - MS only really releases a 'new' official disk when there's an SP, and 8.1 has no SPs. This should save download time post install, and you can periodically just update your updates. I also would suggest using the automatic reboot ...


3

At this level, how do the machine instructions of the driver actually control the hardware device? Can vary wildly depending on the CPU, supporting hardware of the CPU, and the hardware device. On x86 CPUs used on a PC platform, the driver's machine instructions can: read/write to specific memory locations - the same ones used to read/write RAM. ...


3

In a multitasking operating system the OS does not have to do anything as extreme as outright stopping the processor from running at all or filling the time that that process was going to be using with other instructions. It can do something infinitely simpler. It can simply not schedule the task to be run at all. This is the whole point of a multitasking ...


2

Install virtual machine (for example VirtualBox) in your OS. Then install Win98 into the virtual machine and run the Win98 in virtual machine.


2

Just search for 'Windows 8.1 OEM', download the ISO and slipstream the updates. And fortunately, this is not piracy, since you can "only" use a Windows Installation DVD with a original serial key (which you probably paid for). If you want a method to slipstream the updates, here it is: ...


1

You can slipstream the installation disc. There are a few different pieces of software to chose from. Simply google it and pick your tool but they all work basically the same. What slipstreaming does is it allows you to put other programs, updates, etc onto the install disc so that when you go to install, it will take a bit longer but install everything at ...


1

There's now a free Microsoft tool that will help you create the ISO image available here! Download Windows 8.1 Installation Media Creation Tool This includes these options: -- Service Pack 1 -- "Standard", "Pro", and "N" -- One language -- 32 or 64 bit -- Save to USB or ISO FILE You'll need your license key for either 8.0 or 8.1, which reportedly you ...


1

I had this same issue, and unfortunately, it comes down to the manufacturer. It's up to the manufacturer to decide whether to lock it down or not. My mom's laptop runs on Windows 8 and the only option you have is to recover Windows 8. I would suggest contacting Samsung with the details and asking them if there is a workaround. There probably is a key ...


1

There is not one unless you make it yourself. see here: http://lifehacker.com/5894838/customize-your-windows-installation-to-create-the-os-of-your-dreams What you can do is find one with Service Pack one pre-loaded to it. do a Google search for: Windows 8.1 Pro SP1 Legal ISO and see if you can find either 64 bit or 32 bit (x86)


1

You could run a live Linux iso like Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Debian, or Knoppix (it's more like a live-dvd-only and says "Knoppix is not a Linux distribution like for example Debian, openSUSE, Ubuntu or others", but has many "install" options), there are many others that can run live also, most with persistence to save changes. Copying one of their iso's onto ...


1

Yes, that answer (rather confusingly written) is talking about the filesystem. (For some reason, @MarcB seems to be using the terms "operating system" and "file system" interchangeably. "4k block OS"? Seriously?)


1

A block is a single addressable unit on the disk or other medium itself. This is typically 512 bytes, 2048 bytes (optical drives), or 4096 bytes (newer hard drives). A cluster is a group of blocks. On NTFS, for example, when you format a disk, you can select the cluster size. Most filesystems, such as all FAT, NTFS, ext2/3/4 filesystems, need a method of ...


1

FreeBSD does this pretty easily, but since you have Windows & Windows-only apps, that's probably moot. I think the first thing to discover is if your OS is really hitting the disk. Mine doesn't--the apps do. So, install them onto an NTFS SSD if you can (depending on how they store stuff). You could even redirect your user folder to it for settings/data.


1

I actually do this quite frequently when travelling using: a Samsung 840 pro 250 GB SSD swapped between Mac Pro 3.1 (2008) running OSX version 10.9 (Mavericks) Macbook Pro 2010 To accommodate the 2.5" HDD in the 3.5" Mac Pro drive bays I use a Icy Dock EZConvert 2.5-Inch to 3.5-Inch SATA SSD / Hard Drive Converter. It pulls out within ...


1

It sounds like author of the question requires Windows. The only legal solution I know of that allows you to use the same Windows installation on different hardware is Windows to Go. However, Windows to Go is only available for Windows 8 Enterprise, which isn't available to normal consumers.


1

Two issues in one question. The first - the identification of the file system, which depends on the type of GPT partition tables, or MBR. MBR for all sufficiently uniquely determined partition IDs. For GPT - GUIDs for different partition types. Respectively - with the help of GUID and ID set the file system type. Moment number two of this problem - access to ...


1

Perhaps you could, but it wouldn't make any sense. With the two systems having such massive latency between them and no hardware mechanisms for fast memory coherence, it wouldn't make sense to try to combine them in that way. You can't use another person to let your brain control two more arms. You have to let their brain control their arms because your ...


1

Windows 98 is from long time out of support. So you (with very high probability) will not find drivers for motherboard, videocontroller, network. Think about install Windows 7 or 8. Or some linux distribution


1

Windows Server: NT4/2000/2003/2003R2/2008/2008R2/2012 WS: 95/98/NT4/2000/XP/Vista/7/8/8.1 wmic cpu get * /format:list | more GUI: CPU-Z linux: $ less /proc/cpuinfo $ cat /proc/cpuinfo # dmidecode --type processor Ubuntu: $ cat /proc/cpuinfo $ lscpu $ sudo lshw -class processor $ sudo dmidecode -t 4 $ cpuid install cpuid: $ sudo ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible