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17

You're looking for a logarithm, a base-two logarithm specifically. Logarithms do the opposite of exponentiation, so if bx = y, then x = logb y. 24 = 16, so log2 16 = 4. First, you'll need to figure out how many bytes you have. If your number is in kilobytes, multiply by 210. For megabytes, 220, for gigabytes 230, et cetera. As you can see, I'm using the ...


4

Additionally to what Ben said, I recommend first doing the logarithm of your number without units log₂512 = 9 And then take units into consideration: sum 10 for kibibytes, 20 for mebibytes, 30 for gibibytes, ... 9 + 20 = 29 And that's it. No need to calculate huge numbers. That's because logarithms have the following properties: logₙ(a × b) = logₙ(a) +...


3

No, you cant. However, most newer motherboards show you the boot partition in the BIOS, like "Windows Loader on HDD1" or similar. That way you have a clue if there might be a operating installed or not.


2

The names bootx64.efi and bootia32.efi refer to the EFI fallback boot loader program. This program can be anything -- GRUB, the Windows boot loader, an EFI shell, malware, etc. Thus, you should not search for a program by that name; rather, you should search for a program by its actual name (GRUB in your question) and rename it to EFI\BOOT\bootx64.efi or EFI\...


1

Regarding the INTh commands you reference (see: BIOS Interrupt Calls), you are correct that this did use to be the way that an OS would access low-level hardware. In a modern machine, these calls (if executed) often end up in the CSM (Compatibiliy Support Module, at least in AMI parlance) which can handle these requests. In the instance of say a video BIOS ...


1

Most BIOS/UEFI menus have something buried in there to disable/enable individual hard drives or SATA controllers. The OS cannot see this hardware when it's hidden in this way. What this option is called (and whether it exists) varies by manufacturer and BIOS/UEFI vendor, so it's probably best just to carefully look at all the menu options and look for a ...


1

It is surprising that no commercial offering targets this problem directly. Here are some things to investigate. Use a kvm (keyboard/video/mouse) switch that has an extra usb port for, eg, cdrom. This arbitrary example TK-222DVK claims to have 2 bonus USB share ports for storage devices or printers. My understanding is that you can therefore switch a ...


1

The OS allocates as many pages as necessary to map the the sections defined in the executable file. If another copy of the process already exist then the OS will reuse read-only pages at least and if the OS supports copy-on-write then it will reuse already mapped unaltered read-write pages for a new process. For stack segment it will reserve the virtual ...


1

I encountered the same problem. When I ran the VB in admin mode it was solved.



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