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2

For the first part, I can only guess. You don't specify how much RAM you physically have installed, but based on your chipset and CPU I'm guessing you're using integrated graphics and have assigned 768MB (3/4 of a GB) of RAM to graphics processing. That would be consistent with having 4GB of RAM installed and both 32-bit and 64-bit OSes only showing about 3 ...


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There's no technological reason why it would be impossible.  In the 1980s, IBM released the the IBM PC and the PC XT, which were based on the Intel 8088 processor (a predecessor of the 8086 and the x86 line), which had no protected mode: it was always able to do everything.  (It had a very simplistic memory management scheme that allowed it to access a ...


1

Make the Asus recovery USB - you'll need a fairly hefty memory stick due to the recovery data size. Ideally you should use the OEM's pre-created recovery media/process to restore an OEM machine such as from Asus. Modern computers you can make DVD/BluRay/USB recovery media. USB is more convenient. Using the OEM recovery will then guarantee that the Windows ...


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Visual BCD Editor is an alternative. Can create a Windows loader for UEFI or BIOS firmware by simply changing extension of winload to .exe or .efi See also Dual-boot Repair tool for Windows 10. Works also for BIOS of UEFI booting. I would run Dual-boot Repair in Windows 10 and then add a Windows 7 loader using Visual BCD Editor. All is done on click. To ...


3

The root of your problems is you are running out of virtual memory, this is causing your system to lock up long before you actually run out of available physical memory. You need to enable a swap partition on your system and you should see your lockup problems disappear. Please read this answer from a question that was having similar problems to you but on ...


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Bart's Preinstalled Environment (BartPE) bootable live windows CD/DVD is an old, apparently unmantained project, but you can use it to study its implementation or borrow some ideas: Bart's PE Builder helps you build a "BartPE" (Bart Preinstalled Environment) bootable Windows CD-Rom or DVD from the original Windows XP or Windows Server 2003 ...


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Option 1 : Once, this was one of my dreams too. Install Linux Mint. (Believe me, I am a Linux novice too, but it was a breeze). Install VMware Player. Install Windows OS as a virtual machine. That way, you can boot from your external HDD, then start VMware player, and you are onto Windows. I use this setup sometimes to troubleshoot other Windows ...


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If you don't want to restrict yourself to MS Windows, you might want to try a Linux flavoured OS like Ubuntu, etc. There are many instructions on how to put Ubuntu on a USB drive and use it. Here is a link


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You could install GRUB (the Linux boot manager) to the hard drive and simply configure it to load the second partition, which would contain the actual windows files. GRUB can do this (proven by the fact that you can dual boot Linux and Windows through GRUB) and this method is viable if you don't have access to windows to go.


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Is it possible to install Windows OS to plug and play storage devices? You can use Windows To Go. Windows To Go is a feature in Windows 8 Enterprise, Windows 10 Enterprise, and Windows 10 Education that allows them to boot and run from USB mass storage devices such as USB flash drives and external hard disk drives. It is a fully manageable corporate ...


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There is an old project called: BART which used Windows XP.. There is also Ultimate Boot CD for Windows that used this as well.. I don't think there has been any work done on this in quite a while.


1

Thanks Moab! Your link led me to this one right here: http://www.oxhow.com/install-windows-xp-usb-drive-part-2/ And it worked! Except it needs you to have: Windows xp already installed in the pc from which you'll burn your image on your usb Usb of small size < 4GB but I think a newer version of PeToUSB allows that feature A Windows XP SP2 CD. I don't ...


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To put it simple: only a SD card with a hardware write-protection switch, connected through a USB card reader, will be safe. All other devices such as harddisk are at risk to be infected of erased since the virus can remove any write protection on file system.


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If you know a PC is infected, but don't know how the malware operates that has infected it, you need to assume the removable media will also become infected once you attach it to the infected PC, unless you can write-protect the media. Some malware will confine itself to just the boot partition of a system. Other malware will look for removable media to ...


1

NO. Not Legally. Apple OSX license Agreement: http://images.apple.com/legal/sla/docs/OSX10103.pdf Relevant Text: ...you are granted a limited, non-exclusive license to install, use and run one (1) copy of the Apple Software on a single Apple-branded computer... And for the virtual world: ...to install, use and run up to two (2) ...


1

Yes, there are people who run without a pagefile and everything seems fine. However, it is not recommended. Microsoft says dont do it. On top of that, some applications will not work without it. You do have options. You can reduce the pagefile' size. It is important to note, decreasing it to much could have a negative effect, especially if you are RAM ...


0

I concur, OS on the SSD. Steam allows you to have multiple libraries. So you could have some Games on the HDD and some on the SSD. With some games loading time matters, or you want to get into the game quickly (some online games give you an advantage at start up if you have a fast disk). There are plenty of guides out there on how to move Steam Games ...


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Definitely put the OS on the SSD, and install most basic applications like your web browser on there for faster read/write. Since that drive is fairly big you can put some of your larger games (ones that take a while to load) on there, or games you play a lot, which should help load times. HDD should be used for storing files and stuff like that, and you ...


1

Anything that produces a lot of read and writes is better placed on your SSD. As you said that you are browsing the web, you would definetly want to place the browser file cache on the SSD. Same applies to email programs. On the other hand, you want to store large files that are seldonmly used on your harddisk. These are Backups, the windows file history ...


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The hard drive could be packed up resulting in loss of data at the later stage if only repaired... My advice would be to remove that HDD, plug it on a different machine as a slave to perform your backups, then format the entire hard to confirm its consistency, reinstall the OS, then restore your data. If all that fails, replace hard drive


3

Error code 7b refers to your hard drive and/or controller. Boot from Windows 7 DVD. Choose "Repair my PC" and get the command prompt: chkdsk /R c: chkdsk /R d: chkdsk /r E: Then reboot. If it works, After that you seriously want to consider getting a new hdd and cloning the data over and replacing the drive.


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Linux Font Equivalents to Popular Web Typefaces - Monday By Noon has some relevant advice, both for displaying locally (install the msttcorefonts package) and for your visitors (use some other font that looks remotely similar, such as TSCu_Comic). If you truly hate your readers, you could also provide Comic Sans as a web font, although in some jurisdictions ...


2

That one is working because its guest OS has VMware Tools installed and is an OS supported by VMware Player's automatic guest resolution adjustment feature. If you install VMware Tools on the other VMs, they will be able to fill the whole screen. This can be accomplished by selecting "Install VMware Tools" from the VM menu; a CD image of the VMware Tools ...


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You need to install VMware Tools. You can do this by selecting the VM menu from within VMware and select Install VMware Tools



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