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I've successfully activated (an inactivated version of) Windows XP Pro with a key found by Produkey, so I assume in Windows XP there is a key in the install files. I do not know the legality of this endeavor, though.


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Open regedit Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion 3 Right click on the value ProgramFilesDir and change default value C:\Program Files to D:\Program Files or whatever you like Regarding your second query. Some softwares need not be reinstalled after an OS reinstall, like firefox, chrome etc. But many other softwares need ...


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A lot of answers to this question, but they generally miss the point - and many are based on intuition or very limited experience. Hence I am going to repeat here the answer I gave to a question that was closed as a duplicate of this one. As you can see, my answer is not based on "gut feel" or serial experience with a few computers. There are two main ...


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Such stickers do not impact the design of the hardware per se, but rather the availibility and stability of hardware drivers for the hardware in Windows. Typically, hardware is not designed with a particular operating system in mind. An example of this would be typical ARM SoCs (Systems on a Chip) that are capable of running, for example, iOS, Android, or ...


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Some more: DOS. Yes, I know it's old, but there are a VERY surprising number of these still out there. As little in common with (modern) Windows as it has with Linux. Runs on commodity x86 hardware. Also: Being VERY generous with the definition of "x86", precursors to the x86 like the 8080, 8085, 8008 etc may still be in use in things like (cheap and ...


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Embedded applications fit the description. While a lot, probably most, embedded devices probably use some Linux derivative, there are ones out there that are not. There are low-end SoC that are Intel x86, and to keep them cheap, memory runs at an absolute minimum. I read somewhere (can't site source, so take this as heresay) that my old Garmin Etrex runs an ...


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The short answer: yes. Boot up your linux install media, tell it to install on the non-Windows drive, and you're done. To answer the little questions you had: You won't need both drives plugged in at all times. You can't really move those drives between different computers to use them (because of different system configurations). With Linux, it's a ...


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Use a usb thumb drive for mobility, install linux on the portable drive ( or use a 2.5 ssd for more space and speed if needed) . Then use UNetbootin or Yumi to install the linux os on the drive, it's simple and safe. Yumi allows multiple linux installs on the same drive. If you want to use the SATA HD, then get a USB External Case and put the SATA hd ...


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I worked on these systems before and the answer is simple: Hitachi format these diskettes in a special manner not recognizable by Windows or Linux (sectors/tracks) so both of them will keep insisting that floppy is bad but when you pop it into the machine it will work perfectly. There is nothing wrong with disk or drives. For your question of how to copy it ...


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Only a reference to the file in the HDD will be copied in memory, and once you paste the file, the actual data in the file will be copied to the new location. To validate that, try to copy a file from a CD-ROM, and before you paste it, remove the CD, then try to paste. You will get an error that the file does not exist, or something similar. So, that proves ...


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The default install includes things that an average user would want to have. Once installed you can remove a number of different features that you would rather not have. Most of these can be removed through the 'Turn Windows features on or off' on the Add/Remove Programs control panel applet. Remember that Windows 7 and 8, even the 'Pro' versions, are at ...


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Go into your BIOS and change the startup order. Make sure your harddrive is the first drive it tries to boot from. This will make sure it won't try to boot from any USB drive or DVD, etc. New BIOSses usually have a key to access the boot menu anyway which you can use to boot from different media in the case you need to install windows etc.


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As I understand it, you would just be using the 32 bit drivers for any hardware you have. Basically your processor CAN handle 64 bit memory bus, but since the OS you're using is 32 bit only, all things running on that OS (like your everyday programs) will be 32 bit, or x86.


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Sound output can be viewed as a sequential process: App volume -> system volume -> hardware volume. The app and system volume are both percentages of the maximum output volume. Since these are digital signals, they have an upper limit. You can only set it lower than the maximum volume. Hardware volume knobs set the speaker's internal amplifier. They will ...


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You can use applescript. For example if it was TextEdit; Edit a file say command and type in tell application "TextEdit" activate tell application "System Events" keystroke "f" using {command down} end tell end tell Then run osascript command.


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Page tables are handled by the kernel, via kernel internal data structures. But the architecture determines most of the format of those tables. Userland does not have any access to them.


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If you have more than half your drive available, Add a partition to your existing drive then move the non-OS files to the new partition. If you have less than half your drive available, then create a new partition using 90% +/- of the free space, and move as many files as you can to the new partition freeing up space on the original partition. Then ...


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Take out your old harddrive, put in the SSD and install windows. Turn off the machine and install the HDD back in. On boot up, go into the BIOS and tell the computer to boot from the SSD. That should be it.



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