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45

Manufacturers are not obliged to make easy any course of action just because it happens to not be illegal. I don't know what jurisdiction you are in, but I think you'd be hard pressed to find any language in any law that states that overclocking is illegal. I think the key is the "at own risk" - if you make overclocking too easy, people will start playing ...


37

The system time is not based on the CPU but rather another chip on the motherboard, so overclocking the CPU will not alter the "speed" of the system time.


28

I quote from OverClocking Risks: Usually processors in the lower range are produced with the same manufacturing process as the CPUs sold in the mid to high range. The higher rated CPUs are factory overclocked and tested, then sold for a premium. Many users will buy the cheaper processor and over clock it to nearly the same speeds of the ...


23

It's legal but risky - hence why manufacturers make it difficult. It used to be the case that chips were tested and those that failed to meet the highest specification were "downgraded" to a lower spec. (I'm not 100% sure of the process). This means that a CPU rated at 2GHz (say) is functionally identical to one rated at 3GHz. Therefore you could try to ...


19

It basically means that people will alter the settings for their CPU (processor) to go faster than it was designed to do so. By increasing the CPU frequency, you're also obligated to change speed settings for RAM, the system bus and so on. So if you have an Intel or AMD processor that say runs at 2.0GHz, you can overclock that processor (depending on a few ...


15

You can reset your BIOS settings to default a few ways: Remove the CMOS battery temporarily then place it back in Use the CMOS jumpers A method also available on most new computers is to hold down the reset button itself. These methods are explained in more detail here. There is also the possibility your motherboard is toast, but try the above methods ...


13

Skip the liquid cooling while you are learning. You can typically get a very good OC out of Intel chips on air, you really only need liquid if you are running the vCore (CPU Voltage) at a dangerous level and need the extra heat removal. At a safe vCore, you will most likely hit a CPU or system clock limitation before you will hit a heat limit as long as you ...


12

Can overclocking really break hardware? Yes it can as you are making your hardware run at speeds for which it is not designed. Is overclocking safe with modern hardware? Yes and No, it depends on how much you want to push your hardware, honestly answer to this question is subjective. Most modern processors these days come with builtin safety ...


11

Of course it's legal. You can do whatever you want to your equipment. And (in some cases) they do make it easy. The software that comes with ATI graphics cards (Catalyst Control Center) has an overclocking section built right in. As does the software that comes with Asus motherboards. To name a couple. That said, since you can damage the gear with ...


11

Flash memory is limited by a fundamental access time: for 25nm Intel flash it takes 50 microseconds to read 8kB; this translates to 156MB/s, per NAND chip (with typically 8 or 16 NAND chips per SSD that can be accessed in parallel). Yet typical SSD sequential read speeds are 200-400MB/s. So, in theory, there is still scope for improving SSD controllers (as ...


11

61.4 degrees centigrade. Of course, this leaves zero margin for safety, and your motherboard may or may not record temps in half-degree increments. So I'd stick with 60 as a nice round number that happens to give you about 1.5-2 degrees of wiggle room. This would be the maximum upper limit of what your CPU would handle, you'll be pushing the envelope of ...


10

On the flip side of the dire warnings, my experience with overclocking is that the performance boosts are rarely worth the numerous headaches that a less-than-stable system cause (a very common issue with overclocked ram.) Best way I can describe the difference; buy an 80 watt lightbulb, and live with it for a week. The swap out the 75 watt bulb. You ...


9

First, what TIM (thermal paste) are you using? Have you checked it lately? If it is old and dried out, you need to clean it out and refresh it. If it is the stock interface material, you should never have been using it in the first place. Arctic Silver 5 is the standard for overclockers, there may be better (and more expensive) but you won't go wrong with ...


8

As it was said, ubcd4win with the integrated prime95 is a good solution. For a lighter solution you could use this linux distribution: stresslinux stresslinux is a minimal linux distribution running from a bootable cdrom, usb, vmware or via PXE (wip). stresslinux makes use of some utitlities available on the net like: stress, cpuburn, hddtemp, lm_sensors, ...


8

Overclocking is the process of running a computer component at a higher clock rate (more clock cycles per second) than it was designed for or was specified by the manufacturer, usually practiced by enthusiasts seeking an increase in the performance of their computers. Some of them purchase low-end computer components which they then ...


8

Nope. The clock is kept by the CMOS, and is not effected by the CPU overclock.


8

The clock speed of the CPU isn't based on the RTC, so you shouldn't see a change. Note that clock drift happens on computers even at normal clockspeeds anyway, because the RTC isn't perfect to begin with. Clock drift is normal and expected (although it shouldn't be significant on normal systems).


8

The simple answer is that it's legal and can void warranty. However, the CPU warranty is usually really short. Why do it: manufacturers sometimes establish pricing based on market and not the product quality. so a 3.0GHz chip justifies the extra $100 for 3.2GHz but in fact, they could be from the same batch just marked differently. Draw backs: An ...


8

1.5V is the JEDEC standard for DDR3, therefore you will never fry a module at this voltage. Some sources: Hynix: "Hynix DDR3L SDRAM provides backward compatibility with the 1.5V DDR3" Crucial refers to this as Dual Voltage: In the past, most DDR3 memory voltage ranged from 1.5 - 1.65v. More recently, dual 1.35/1.5 voltage modules came available at ...


7

Two completely separate approaches to increase performance. Overclocking is the process of tweaking motherboard (or graphics cards) settings to have the 'clock' run faster than the vendor certified. Can increase performance for single or multiple threaded scenarios. Also has risk because excess heat can be generated which can damage circuitry. ...


7

It is not illegal, it voids warranties. You are pushing the device beyond it's manufacturer support limits. If you destroy your GPU or CPU, the manufacturer won't replace it because you did something to the device that is unsupported. It's like buying tires, but sanding the tires down to make them slicks, then your tires blow out. The tire manufacturer ...


7

In addition to what TheTXI posted... You are running the hardware beyond its rated limits. It can void warranties and damage hardware. You can see weird errors depending on the issues. It varies from each combination of hardware. It is mainly for the hobbiest or someone who wants to take the risk to get that little extra performance out of their machine.


6

What is meant by "OC" (Overclocked) varies depending on what exactly the vendor means. Yes it is ambiguous, and the only way to know for sure is to contact the manufacturer or vendor and obtain clarification. There is no "standard" way for it to mean one specific thing all of the time. It could mean: This chip has been tested to support (under certain ...


6

Are you sure it's not just saving energy? Put some load with youtube HD videos and look if it doesn't speed up. CPU-Z will report the changes in real time. My core i5 goes from 1200 MHz to 2800 MHz every time it needs more speed.


6

The Pentium 4 630 comes with SpeedStep which downclocks when the load is less to reduce power consumption/heat buildup. SpeedStep is a trademark for a series of dynamic frequency scaling technologies, including SpeedStep, SpeedStep II, and SpeedStep III built into some Intel microprocessors that allow the clock speed of the processor to be dynamically ...


5

As harrymc pointed out, the manufacturing process for a range of processors is same. Sometimes, it is difficult for manufacturers to calculate how many processors will fall into each category in a range and that can cause problems. I remember that several years ago (Athlon XP era, if I remember correctly) AMD did some miscalculations and got large amount of ...


5

Both temperature and voltage kills a CPU. A high voltage spike can kill it quickly. In your case I wouldn't worry though. The voltage spikes you have are still low. The Intel spec sheets specify the max vCore VID as 1.52v for that processor. Now, I wouldn't actually run the processor at anything near that, but on the other hand I doubt a voltage spike up to ...


5

The TomsHardware Overclocking forum is a good place to look for specific things on your hardware. You will also get comparative results and suggestions from other users having similar hardware at the Overclock.net Hardware guide Here is a more generic description with suggestions and tools.


5

Many people advice 1:1 ratio, but there are also testimonies for the opposite. For example, see So much for 1:1 fsb:dram ratio being the best. I quote from FSB:DRAM 1:1 ratio question: The higher clocked the RAM is, the more performance one will get from the RAM. the 1:1 thing is a bunch of bull. Other devices besides the CPU request and store ...


5

You could use Ultimate Boot CD. Download and burn the ISO into a CD or put the contents into a bootable thumb drive. Boot from the CD/thumb drive. From the options which has several tools, you could select mainboard tools and then StressCPU test from there to stress test your CPU. Check this, for the list of tools available in this ISO.



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