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18

If the temperature goes above 70-80 Celsius (158 to 176 Fahrenheit) chances are that the capacitors become unstable. A car-trunk in full sunlight can reach that high a temperature. They can take some heat but not for days on end. Problem is made worse by old capacitors (old being pre- 2006). They have less tolerance for heat. Just run the oldest newest of ...


16

As long as the system is adequately cooled, it won't be a problem. For a laptop, this is a greater concern and you would be well advised to make sure that vents have adequate clearance and that the ambient temperature is kept in check. You'd also want to clean the dust out of the system every so often too. The same routines apply to desktop systems too, but ...


9

100% usage is probably the goal of the CPU as it's always working. The downside is that you can't put any more load on it. It's OK to run a computer at 100% CPU. As long as your cooling systems are working, there shouldn't be any problems. If your cooling systems aren't working, heat will shorten the life of your computer.


7

Yes, it could be the thermal paste, or even not quite a flush mount. I would suggest picking up some new thermal paste from either an online resource like Newegg, or from a local retailer like Fry's or Microcenter and follow the instructions provided with the product closely. Additionally, make certain the heat sink is flush, and mounted firmly with all 4 ...


7

The fan is turning on because the CPU is being taxed. You can look at what processes are using the CPU with Activity Monitor: image credit Activity Monitor is a built-in application. Type "Activity Monitor" into Spotlight and it should be the first result.


7

You can use a tool like hwmonitor to check to see if the CPU may be overheating. Update: If the computer's CPU is overheating and the computer is less than a year old, it is faulty and should be replaced by the retailer under warranty (depending on consumer laws in your country) The alternative is to take it for repair or attempt yourself to disassemble ...


7

You should be okay if you left them in there one or two times. However, prior to booting them up, I would recommend letting them cool down naturally. Otherwise, you may get condensation built up internally which could cause issues. Same way in the reverse (taking a cold laptop into a warm environment). Think of it like a cold glass of water, taken outside. ...


6

This sounds like a classic case of overheating. Before doing anything else, open it up and clean the fan. If your problem persists, change the thermal paste between the heat sink and the CPU. The computer shutting down after the fans have been spinning very fast for a while is a clear indication of cooling problems. As is the fact that the machine will not ...


6

DO THIS ONLY IF YOU ARE COMFORTABLE WITH OPENING COMPUTERS!!!!!!!!! If your laptop's fan is spinning this much, then most likely there is some dust stuck in the cooling vents. Open up your laptop. Then, using a can of compressed air (usually CO2) simply blast all the dust and dirt out of the laptop, including the vents and fans. This should do the trick. ...


5

Short answer: The CPU assert the PROCHOT pin and turns itself off. It is up to the motherboard to act (or not) on that signal. Longer answer When the CPU gets hot (but has not yet reached emergency shutdown temperature) it will throttle itself. That means it will lower the multiplier and the voltage. As a result processing get slower but the CPU also ...


5

Forget case airflow right off the bat. With an open case it won't be a problem, and with a closed case it takes more than a few minutes to cause adverse effects, and you don't have enough components in there (power hungry video cards, etc.) to cause too much issues. It could be a fan issue. If your fans are very silent at max speed, they might not go fast ...


5

Update the BIOS and IPMI firmware for the motherboard, as they may be reporting a false overheat if the sensors aren't being recognized properly. By doing this, and/or using their IPMI control utilities, you should be able to get the BMC updated and refreshed, so that it knows which sensors, fans, etc. are installed. You can get them from SuperMicro's ...


5

This depends on the air flow in your case and on the ambient temperature. And on the drives themselves. If you live in the tropics, no air flows over the drives and they get hot (e.g. being multi-platter old 7200+ RPM drives). Then yes, worry. Measure the temperature (software wise), add a fan if needed. If you live someplace cool and/or have some air flow ...


5

Such extreme temperature is probably the failure of the video card's cooling system. Possibilities are: fan is failing and rpm has dropped to a non-effective level. dust has built up too much gpu chip contact is broken off with the heat sink room temperature is too high It could be one or a combination of these issues. Since 9800GT is an almost 5 year ...


5

this is the only thing I can find that references Phenom processors: http://support.amd.com/us/Processor_TechDocs/43375.pdf Pages 26 to 59 have the temp data - you'll just have to look at the coding on your processor to find out which one relates to your model.


4

Considering how much dust can accumulate between the fan and the heatsink in a laptop... ... did you take apart the laptop to get between the fan and the heatsink, or did you just take a can of compressed air and blow it into the exhaust port to push the dust back into the fan to break it up? Running the fan long enough without free flowing air can speed ...


4

Check the Task manager. Under "Processes" you can see individual CPU usage for your processes, and there is a global graph under "Performance". If there is dust in the cooling elements, the fan will have to work harder to keep the temperature down since the air flow is obstructed. This is common with older laptops. If you have the confidence, you can ...


4

The CPU will not self-destruct from heat. It has a thermal safety that will shut it down before it suffers physical damage. Most likely, heat is not being conducted properly from the CPU to the case, so the case itself won't overheat. (It will actually see less total heat because the CPU will throttle.) I'd recommend reducing the clock speed and multiplier ...


4

I have no knowledge about possibility for turning off such warnings, but I'd like to point out, that actually - your kernel needs to lower your CPU frequency because of constant overheating. It's not a warning about high temperature 10 degrees before the yellow light would light on. I'd recommend you to try to get better cpu/mainboard cooling - otherwise ...


4

You said: I had cpu cooling (fan) but it went kaput :( This is why you are having this problem. Your CPU is overheating; these messages are warning you that the system is throttling down in order to prevent permanent physical damage to the system. I generally expect a Core i7 desktop CPU running under full load to be somewhere around 75-80 degrees ...


4

RealTemp lets you adjust the Clock Modulation by percentage of the maximum, but that's only an ugly patch for the underlying problem. The most common causes of overheating laptops are (more or less in that order): The CPU cooler's exhaust vents are clogged up with dust. This normally causes the temperature of all other components to raise as well. Dirty ...


4

I have seen this issue on HP and others, usually means the dc jack or power cord connector is damaged, not making good electrical contact causing resistance which translates to heat, melting the plastic. replacement of the dc jack usually cures the problem, but check the power cord connector for damage also, depends on design which one actually fails to make ...


4

Check your Windows system logs and BIOS logs to see if the even was a thermal shutdown. If its not listed there, that doesnt necessarily mean its not a thermal shutdown, but if it is, then you know for sure. If you are comfortable with opening a laptop up, then do so and blow out any dust, hair, whatever that might have accumulated inside. See if any ...


3

The solution to your problem is to configure your OS to sleep/hibernate when the lid-switch is triggered. There is no OS-independent, hardware-based solution for your problem.


3

A previous question answer talked about the Panasonic Toughbook as pretty much the only option. However, I can't find any information about their operating temperature range. The Panasonic Toughbook CF-31 is certified for operation at 140°F


3

In order to favorably remove the warning clutter IS to address the hardware component that has failed (the fan) or its related components (heat sink clogged, vents blocked), just like if your SMART data for your hard drive was warning you of bad blocks. Yes you can keep usung the drive but the possability of imminent failure is being given to you to try and ...


3

You won't get an event log warning if the laptop shut down due to BIOS intervention, which is usually due to overheating. The OS isn't shut down cleanly, the BIOS just cuts power to everything and stops the CPU. If this was a desktop I'd suggest it is a power supply issue or maybe the thermal paste/heatsink needs to be reapplied to the CPU. Check the BIOS ...


3

It is unlikely to be overheating. Any reasonable laptop will have a thermal shutoff and, in any case, electronics really are not that sensitive to heat. Certainly running constantly hot does reduce lifetimes but other than that, the main impact is in rapid changes in heat not just running hot. Far more likely is that the hard drive has been operational ...


3

ascom mentioned dust affecting your fan - I think he's spot on; this does seem like a typical dust case; I've seen the problem multiple times. You do not need to open up your laptop for a quick fix! This is what I normally do - Find the spot your laptop where air enters into the cooling fan. Blow into this spot with all your breath! Blow blow blow! A lot ...


3

Yes it is both possible and desired. It is a safety feature, the CPU is throttled when the temperature rises. This will bring the temperature down since a slower CPU produces less heat. Wikipedia says (emphasis mine): Dynamic frequency scaling (also known as CPU throttling) is a technique in computer architecture whereby the frequency of a microprocessor ...



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