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221

The concern isn't really when it's in the fridge but when you take it out. The cold laptop/parts will pull the water out of the air AFTER it's taken out of the fridge, even if it was in a plastic bag. Think of a glass of water, it doesn't 'sweat' when it's in the fridge but you take it out on a hot day and it does. The other concern is, depending on the ...


107

As you suspect, it is not a very good idea. The cooler air inside the fridge can quickly condense the vapor normally found in the air, producing little droplets of water on the coolest parts (such as the motherboard). Even if you find it effective, it may result in damage to your computer. I simply suggest you not do it. Read USGS website for more ...


51

As others already said, you're killing your laptop with the condensation. The water will usually not lead to a short circuit immediately, but instead lead to rust buildup first before the final shutdown after a couple times in the freezer. Better solutions: You say the laptop is still under warranty: Use the warranty. Bottled air to clean the fans without ...


45

I have a similar overheating problem with my MacBook. The fan was always spinning away. My solution was to freeze an ice pack (I think that's what they're called). Wrap it in a tea towel (to absorb moisture) and sit my MacBook on that. After a few minutes or so, the fan stopped and my MacBook was happily cooled.


22

As long as the system is adequately cooled, it won't be a problem. For a laptop, this is a greater concern and you would be well advised to make sure that vents have adequate clearance and that the ambient temperature is kept in check. You'd also want to clean the dust out of the system every so often too. The same routines apply to desktop systems too, but ...


20

If the temperature goes above 70-80 Celsius (158 to 176 Fahrenheit) chances are that the capacitors become unstable. A car-trunk in full sunlight can reach that high a temperature. They can take some heat but not for days on end. Problem is made worse by old capacitors (old being pre- 2006). They have less tolerance for heat. Just run the oldest newest of ...


13

The condensation that could form when you remove the laptop from the fridge would make me worry enough to not to do it at all. I have seen people that have drilled holes in the body for cooling and other crazy things like that in the past. Maybe it's time to upgrade the machine? EDIT from comments: Stop using Google Chrome for Mac. It seems to consume far ...


12

100% usage is probably the goal of the CPU as it's always working. The downside is that you can't put any more load on it. It's OK to run a computer at 100% CPU. As long as your cooling systems are working, there shouldn't be any problems. If your cooling systems aren't working, heat will shorten the life of your computer.


10

The fan is turning on because the CPU is being taxed. You can look at what processes are using the CPU with Activity Monitor: image credit Activity Monitor is a built-in application. Type "Activity Monitor" into Spotlight and it should be the first result.


10

As the previous posters wrote, condensation is a major danger for the laptop, so putting it in the fridge could possibly be the end of it. The overheating issue most probably is due to the fact that dust, fluff, animal/human hair and other materials have clogged the laptop's metal grille between the fan and the air vent. Additionally, the thermal paste ...


8

Don't do it unless you don't mind losing the laptop (and the data on it). Typically, people live in spaces where the air has some humidity. Air will hold some amount of water vapor depending on the temperature (more if warmer). A typical indoor space might be carrying, for instance, half the humidity that it can accommodate at room temperature. When you ...


7

Yes, it could be the thermal paste, or even not quite a flush mount. I would suggest picking up some new thermal paste from either an online resource like Newegg, or from a local retailer like Fry's or Microcenter and follow the instructions provided with the product closely. Additionally, make certain the heat sink is flush, and mounted firmly with all 4 ...


7

You can use a tool like hwmonitor to check to see if the CPU may be overheating. Update: If the computer's CPU is overheating and the computer is less than a year old, it is faulty and should be replaced by the retailer under warranty (depending on consumer laws in your country) The alternative is to take it for repair or attempt yourself to disassemble ...


7

Short answer: The CPU asserts the PROCHOT pin and turns itself off. It is up to the motherboard to act (or not) on that signal. Longer answer When the CPU gets hot (but has not yet reached emergency shutdown temperature) it will throttle itself. That means it will lower the multiplier and the voltage. As a result processing get slower but the CPU also ...


7

You should be okay if you left them in there one or two times. However, prior to booting them up, I would recommend letting them cool down naturally. Otherwise, you may get condensation built up internally which could cause issues. Same way in the reverse (taking a cold laptop into a warm environment). Think of it like a cold glass of water, taken outside. ...


7

LinusTechTips has done a video about it: PC Build in a Fridge - Does it Work? Fridge is not designed for computer cooling, CPU/GPU cooler with thermal paste is the way to go. Since it's a MacBook Air/Pro, I know it's not easy to open it and everything. How safe is to keep a laptop in the fridge? About the laptop itself it will be fine, components are ...


7

Putting your computer inside the fridge isn't necessarily a problem by itself, but it is no solution either. But first, I do have a few comments beyond what I already read in other answers. Putting the warm laptop in a plastic bag or sleeve before placing it into the fridge is a bad idea. Warm air holds lots of moisture; as it cools, you will see ...


6

Such extreme temperature is probably the failure of the video card's cooling system. Possibilities are: fan is failing and rpm has dropped to a non-effective level. dust has built up too much gpu chip contact is broken off with the heat sink room temperature is too high It could be one or a combination of these issues. Since 9800GT is an almost 5 year ...


6

This sounds like a classic case of overheating. Before doing anything else, open it up and clean the fan. If your problem persists, change the thermal paste between the heat sink and the CPU. The computer shutting down after the fans have been spinning very fast for a while is a clear indication of cooling problems. As is the fact that the machine will not ...


6

DO THIS ONLY IF YOU ARE COMFORTABLE WITH OPENING COMPUTERS!!!!!!!!! If your laptop's fan is spinning this much, then most likely there is some dust stuck in the cooling vents. Open up your laptop. Then, using a can of compressed air (usually CO2) simply blast all the dust and dirt out of the laptop, including the vents and fans. This should do the trick. ...


6

Forget case airflow right off the bat. With an open case it won't be a problem, and with a closed case it takes more than a few minutes to cause adverse effects, and you don't have enough components in there (power hungry video cards, etc.) to cause too much issues. It could be a fan issue. If your fans are very silent at max speed, they might not go fast ...


5

Considering how much dust can accumulate between the fan and the heatsink in a laptop... ... did you take apart the laptop to get between the fan and the heatsink, or did you just take a can of compressed air and blow it into the exhaust port to push the dust back into the fan to break it up? Running the fan long enough without free flowing air can speed ...


5

The CPU will not self-destruct from heat. It has a thermal safety that will shut it down before it suffers physical damage. Most likely, heat is not being conducted properly from the CPU to the case, so the case itself won't overheat. (It will actually see less total heat because the CPU will throttle.) I'd recommend reducing the clock speed and multiplier ...


5

This depends on the air flow in your case and on the ambient temperature. And on the drives themselves. If you live in the tropics, no air flows over the drives and they get hot (e.g. being multi-platter old 7200+ RPM drives). Then yes, worry. Measure the temperature (software wise), add a fan if needed. If you live someplace cool and/or have some air flow ...


5

Update the BIOS and IPMI firmware for the motherboard, as they may be reporting a false overheat if the sensors aren't being recognized properly. By doing this, and/or using their IPMI control utilities, you should be able to get the BMC updated and refreshed, so that it knows which sensors, fans, etc. are installed. You can get them from SuperMicro's ...


5

No, it is not too hot. 50 degrees C is pretty normal and safe temperature for electronics. However I would be worried about the CPU temperature. It seems to me that you are having a problem with temperature sensor, or its calibration. From numbers you have provided, your CPU temperature is lower than your ambient room temperature. This is not possible for ...


5

Is it possible that the card has been destroyed somehow without functioning fans? Yes. Excessive heat reduces component life. Some of the parts have thermal safeties, but many of them don't. Why would losing power have been the point at which the card stopped working? There are three possible reasons. One is just coincidence. Another is that stopping ...


5

It may also be how you are handling your laptop. Make sure when you use it that you are giving the fan enough room to work to its full potential. Do not block the fan or put your laptop on a soft surface (like a bed). This does not allow for proper ventilation. Also, since you mentioned summer, try to keep your laptop out of direct sunlight; this may cause ...


4

Check the Task manager. Under "Processes" you can see individual CPU usage for your processes, and there is a global graph under "Performance". If there is dust in the cooling elements, the fan will have to work harder to keep the temperature down since the air flow is obstructed. This is common with older laptops. If you have the confidence, you can ...


4

I have seen this issue on HP and others, usually means the dc jack or power cord connector is damaged, not making good electrical contact causing resistance which translates to heat, melting the plastic. replacement of the dc jack usually cures the problem, but check the power cord connector for damage also, depends on design which one actually fails to make ...



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