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Your /dev/md1 appears to be a combination of two partitions, each 16 GiB in size (or possibly different sizes which add up to 32 GiB). Output from fdisk -l added afterward contradicts that. Without a complete history we can only speculate what led to the present condition of /dev/md1, but one possibility is that the partition tables changed after the RAID ...


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I have had this happen to me once before. The solution on that machine was to edit the boot order of the BIOS, so that the hard drive was the first boot option (In fact, if I remember rightly I moved the USB device to the very last option in the boot order priorities). After saving that, I booted from the USB by pressing F10 (motherboard specific) and doing ...


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Well, the disk0s2 partition has a wrong/bogus partition type GUID. If that was a modern CoreStorage partition, its GUID should be: 53746F72-6167-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC If that was an older HFS+ partition, its GUID should be: 48465300-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC I don't have any advice for how to fix the GUID type back to what it should be, other than, "Be ...


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Use GParted from a live CD to resize and move partitions.


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Clone your Windows partition. Shrink Debian partition and resize Windows partition to according to your needs Format Windows partition and restore from clone. If you aren't sure about which tool to use I can recommend PartedMagic as it contains all the tools you'll need. (Clonezilla and GParted)


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Quite simply your motherboard is too old. Buy (or use) a smaller drive as your boot disk and use the new one for bulk storage. From Table 3: Windows support for combinations of boot firmware and partitioning schemes for the boot volume at Windows support for hard disks that are larger than 2 TB Microsoft does not support BIOS + GPT as a boot volume, nor ...


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You haven't said how old your motherboard is, or what features it supports. Mokubai may be correct, but if your computer was introduced in mid-2011 or later, it may already use UEFI firmware, which supports booting from a GPT disk. Even a few older motherboards use EFI. You'll need to re-install in EFI mode, though; most EFIs include a Compatibility Support ...


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You'll need the filesystem unmounted, but you don't need to actually use a live CD. A live CD is just convenient when the filesystem is /. (I haven't tried this, but I believe you could actually do it online if you didn't mind destroying the filesystem.) Any should work, as long as it has new enough tools (and, I suppose theoretically maybe not too new). ...



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