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Short: The way volume licensing works is that companies get a single Volume license for all their machines - on top, with the condition that the existing machines that they want to manager under the VL, will/ must have their own licenses; cheaper if OEM, as compared to retail. Confirming Your Information: Company owned Work laptop with OEM Windows 8 ...


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1. This 25GB part. has linux installed on it. As per comments by Moab, this will be (or was) the actual recovery partition. If you have already replaced it with something else - Linux - then you won't be able to recover using it anyway. If it still contains the Factory Image then you can delete this partition if you have created separate Recovery Disk(s). ...


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use ntfs-3g command with remove_hiberfile option . You need to mount the partition in read-write mode and are not able to or willing to boot into Windows. so, it is not included here because it completely deletes hiberfil.sys and will cause you to lose all unsaved information in the hibernated Windows programs. The following is a quotation from man ...


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Try this; Backup all important data from the disk or partition (if you make 2 or more drive from 1 hard disk, ex drive C and drive D) Boot from your installation media, do not choose install now, but choose repair your computer, after that choose advanced option, choose command prompt. Type "diskpart" at command prompt then hit enter. Type "list disk" then ...


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If you just bought your miniPC, then you might not have a lot of data on it. If you are comfortable with installing windows then this would make the process much simpler. You can try to reinstall Windows 8.1 from a USB drive or a CD and use The ""Micro SD"" as the installation drive. Then the MicroSd will become your primary "Hard Drive" and the updates ...


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The trouble you will have is with updates the un-installers and such are closely linked into the OS partition and can't be moved to another drive. You might be able to get away with junctions but it is likely your SD card is not available to the OS at boot so unless you are lucky or careful you could end up with a non-working system. Originally you state ...


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Use WSUS Offline Update WSUS Offline Update will allow you to download the updates to the directory of your choice. You then hit Start to update your system.


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If the mounting is successful with /dev/sdb, meaning without a partition number, then you have created a filesystem on the whole disk without any partitions. This is not supported in Windows and is the reason why nothing is showing up. Also would explain why trying to read the partition info would result in strange results. You will need to repartition the ...


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Check that you're using a legitimate copy of Windows, if you are not it could be flagging it and not letting you proceed. If it's legitimate then make sure you have all the up to date drivers


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Apple is ending support for Windows 7 through BootCamp (source). If your model Macbook Pro is not listed here, then Windows 7 is no longer supported for your laptop.


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In Linux just remember to move let in /home and /var in the hdd do have more space in /home and not let the frequent writes in these directories degrade your ssd.


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Its good to let the entire /var in the hdd. There are several /var directories that are regularly written beyond /var/log, for example cups can put jobs in /var/spool, apt package manager put downloaded packages in /var/cache and install info in /var/lib. The definition of /var is a directory to hold VARiable data. PS: add noatime flag in your ext4 ...


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There's used space on a newly-created partition! What's the deal? On ext3/ext4 filesystems, some space is reserved for the root user. Why? Rather than explain it myself, I will refer you to André Paramés' answer on a question over at Unix.SE, quoting from the tune2fs manpage: Reserving some number of filesystem blocks for use by privileged processes is ...


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The absolutely easiest way I found using Linux was the following: Partition the drive (I used GParted) in 2 partitions with the SECOND partition being large enough to hold your operating system. My drive was a 2GB Flash Drive so I created a 500MB Partition 1 and the remainder as Partition2. I installed the latest version of UNetbootin on my Linux ...


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I have tried this myself. New installation will not activate again. You can also refer to this official post: https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/insider/forum/insider_wintp-insider_install/pre-release-product-keys-for-windows-10-insider/97e6cd1f-ee8a-42ea-b76c-46aa4af8e203?tm=1437003762162 Quote "We hope Insiders will continue to test Build 10240, which ...


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Enabling Optware is not the same as enabling JFFS. JFFS is used as an alias for the partition at /jffs. It’s usually hosted on the router’s flash memory. However, you can use mount --bind to place it on virtually any partition. (Enabling it on internal flash may be required anyway.) To enable JFFS on internal flash, follow these instructions: The steps ...


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Not a proper answer, but to long for just comments: Spinning rust (aka classical HDD)s can be written many times. Flash cells are more fragile and will fails with far fewer writes. If you combine a filesystem which is not aware of that (e.g. FAT which keeps its directory listing in one place and updates that quite often) with raw access to flash based ...


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Ok so what you need to do is "clean" the disk. Open an elevated command prompt. Click Start and type in cmd and right click on that and click Run as Administrator. Now type in diskpart and hit enter. Type in list disk and you will get an output of the hard drives and flash drives you have. Then type in select disk # # being the number of the disk you want ...


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The asterisk is simply a method that marks the disk you have selected, and indicates which disk actions will be performed on if you choose to do so. This asterisk is equivalent to the highlighting of a line in Windows Explorer. For example, when you single click on a file, the line turns blue. You haven't opened the file or changed anything, it's simply ...


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"--rereadpt" command is for rereading partition table. Partitions don't have partition table, only disks have. So you should run this: blockdev --rereadpt /dev/sda


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Your hard disk is GPT style disk. I don't see EFI system partition(ESP), Microsoft Reserved Partition(MSR) - have you deleted them too ? Also why is the OS partition hidden ? Complete mess. You have 1512 MB free on start of disk there you should create 2 partitions: EFI system partition - at least 100 MB. MSR exactly 128 MB. Use diskpart for creating ...


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If U haven't installed Ubuntu on LVM partitions, then there is a simple way to recover grub from windows without any live CD. Install EasyBCD - Community Edition on Windows 7. Open the program. On the left side, click "Add New Entry", then under Operating Systems menu, select "Linux/BSD". Then under Type, select "Grub 2". Use some name in Name field. Then ...


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Seems after some investigation that this is a normal amount of partitions and that each serves for some purpose. A big help in my search was the partition type GUID that is assigned to every partition of a GPT-organised disk as found on new computers. This identifier tell about the type of content the partition has. Also Moab's suggestion of assigning a ...


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Windows installer overwrites GRUB and you have to reinstall it. Make a live USB or CD you can use for the recovery. Boot from the live CD/USB and open a terminal Type 'sudo fdisk -l' and you will see devices like sda/sdb and a number. These are your hard drives and the pendrive is listed here too, and the numbers are your partitions. Find the hard drive ...


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DO NOT USE THE STANDARD WINDOWS UTILITIES TO CREATE PARTITIONS TO WHICH YOU'LL INSTALL LINUX!!!! On a BIOS-based install (using an MBR disk), Windows' tools tend to convert a disk from a conventional setup to one that uses the Logical Disk Manager (LDM) system, which is next to impossible to use for Linux installation. This is most likely to happen when you ...


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Make Room for Linux: You’ll need free space on your Windows system drive to install Linux, or possibly a second entirely different hard drive if you have a desktop PC, resize your Windows system partition to make room for Linux, most Linux installers allow you to resize Windows NTFS partitions, so you can do this during the installation process, you can ...


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I frequently use a gparted live cd to shrink a windows partition (NTFS OR FAT32) and make the change i need on a hard drive. with some linux distro you can shrink the windows partition with gparted and then use the ' use free space ' option while installing linux.


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Your disk uses the GUID Partition Table (GPT), which supports up to 128 partitions by default. Some of the partitions you mentioned are necessary for system operation. Others were added by Sony and are needed by Sony's tools, such as the recovery partitions, that are used for (drum roll, please) recovery operations. Many of these partitions are likely to be ...


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First, fix your driver problem. If you attempt to repair the disk with the bad driver, the best you'll get is access to a portion of the partition. At worst, you'll overwrite critical data in the partition, thus making matters worse. With the driver problem fixed, you might be able to recover your original partition data with suitable partitioning software. ...


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Just open windows partition manager. If it doesn't allow you to edit the partitions as you need them, do a Google search for "linux partition manager live usb" and create a bootable USB using an ISO or IMG file. Then boot into that and have fun partitioning without restriction.


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You can go that hard route, or you can achieve multi-boot with one boot partition with the following simple steps, Make each OS, your sda1 RHEL 6.7 sda2 RHEL 7.0 sda3 RHEL 7.1 sda5 SUSE 12 sda6 Fedora, etc, to boot on their own from their own partition Use GRUB2 Chainloader to boot them individually. Ref: here, here and here. Here is an example: ...


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Had the same situation today. My MacBook Pro disk died and was showing the "invalid record count" error. I wasn't able to boot, to mount the disk and copy any data out of it. As much as I didn't enjoy shelling 100$+ on the commercial software the DiskWarrior fixed my problem and I recovered my data. Highly recommended! The steps: When you install the ...


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To complement the other answers already posted. I have been using MHDDFS for 10+ years now. I believe that it has some performance issues as discussed on damek but it just creates a virtual volume out of your existing mounts, super simple for me. Once installed it is just single line in /etc/fstab: mhddfs#/mnt/hdd1,/mnt/hdd2,/mnt/hdd3 /mnt/virtual fuse ...


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Give this thread a shot. Specifically the answer from Krige. Linux can be a bit buggy at times with certain hardware. It's possible that the Linux distros may not be able to recognize your HDD. I've had the same problem trying to install Ubuntu on my laptop (a Lenovo). I never did get it figured out and resorted to running it in a virtual environment. It's a ...


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I had a similar problem. I used the "GUI way" posted by ansgri to change the format for the swap partition from unknown to linux-swap.This didn't solve the problem, but may have helped. I found that the UUID shown in /etc/crypttab was incorrect. I ran blkid to find the correct UUID for the swap partition. Modifed /etc/crypttab to read the correct UUID. ...


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What file system is the disk using? If it's ext4, you might be able to do it with resize2fs: https://codesilence.wordpress.com/2013/03/14/live-resizing-of-an-ext4-filesytem-on-linux/ Some relevant info: You can use fdisk to change your partition table while running. The stock Ubuntu install has created 3 partitions: one primary (sda1), one extended ...


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If all you wish to do with /dev/sdb is wipe it completely, make sure it isn't mounted, then try $ sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdb bs=1G count=1 ... but in doing so, make VERY sure that you do NOT type anything else than /dev/sdb - if that IS where the drive is. $ lsblk should list the available and mounted drives/devices with some exceptions. No need ...


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In GParted a key or padlock icon beside a partition indicates that the partition is active, mounted or otherwise in use. Although it is possible to perform some actions on a partition while it is in use, most actions are available only when the partition is not in use. In the case of your LVM2 PV (Physical Volume) partition, you will need to de-activate ...


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WMI (wmic command) is available in Windows XP (SP3 or may be even early) (as a diskpart.exe btw). So in Windows XP you can use as Msinfo32 as Wmic to check offset. 1024K offset is the best choice for SDD and 4k disks or RAID.


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have you checked in Disk Management (diskmgmt.msc) if the 25gb partition is assigned a drive letter correctly. I have a similar key setup as you, 10gb boot and ~120gb data space which gets letters U & V accordingly - I'm using usbdlm to control the USB drive letter assignments.


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First, fire up Disk Management and delete the partition to create some unallocated space where it was. Screenshot of Disk Management with 500GB of unallocated space where the partition was. (I don't have enough reputation to post images...) Next, right click the empty space and create a simple volume where it was. When prompted to format it as NTFS, ...


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Fond a solution, using AOMEI Partition Manager, solved my problem For those who are insterested


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What you want to do is dual boot Windows 7 and Ubuntu. When you install Ubuntu, the grub boot loader is automatically installed. This allows you to choose whether you want to boot between Windows or Ubuntu/Linux. What to do: Run the Ubuntu installer as usual and when it comes to the part when you choose Installation type, select Something else: Note: ...


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In green on the screenshot, you've got around 200 GB of free space. You should be able to use this space to create an ext3 partition along with a swap partition for Ubuntu to be installed. The easiest way to do this is to startup a live Ubuntu from DVD or USB. When the live OS is loaded, use GParted to prepare your drive. Then restart your computer and ...


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If it's just corruption of your Windows installation from, say, a virus, power loss at a weird moment, or a bad controller/driver for your hard disk, you're fine using a separate partition for your recovery data. Many (maybe most) new computers you buy come this way out of the box now. However, hard disk failure is one of the biggest reasons to have this ...


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Your non-os partitions will remain unaffected except in the case of your actual drive itself suffering a catastrophic failure either by failure/malfunction of the hardware or as the result of malicious attack. If you have a dual/multiple OS setup, of which windows should always be on the first partition to avoid "aggravation", you other OS will be ...


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This was the case for drives partioned with MBR (Master Boot Record). Modern PC's come with drives partioned in GPT (GUID Partition Table), which has a limit of 128 partitions. You can find more information about the differences here.


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Well, init cannot really know all by itself which files a given service needs, so "this service uses /var" dependencies still need to be declared somewhere anyway. Of course, that ought to be done by the developers & packagers, not by you. For example, the aforementioned systemd-random-seed.service already has all the necessary dependencies: $ ...


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It is purely personal choice. If the partition fills up and you need to install or update software then you may need to resize the partition. Be careful, however, as resizing a partition can lead to data loss. For convenience it is much easier to use a single partition spanning the entire disk - so you don't have to worry about moving/resizing partitions, ...


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If you were able to add an SSD format and mount it the RAID should be no problem. Root access might be required once to mount, and assign permission to the RAID, but not after that. A hardware RAID 5 or 6 will run circles around a software RAID because the RAID card has its own memory and CPU and your CPU does none of the work. Use a ,raid lingo, stripe ...



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