New answers tagged

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As others have pointed out, the Win8-key cannot be used to install Win8.1. You would have to install Win8 first and then upgrade to Win8.1. Or you can use the generic key, as pointed out by @Ramhound and afterwards enter your Win8 key to activate win8.1. But here's another suggestion: Win10 accepts Win7/8/8.1 keys directly. So I would suggest to directly ...


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As Manoj said, A Windows 8 key can not be used for activating Windows 8.1 Based on your situation,you could install Windows 8 first, then perform a upgrade. Since Windows 10 is available now,you can upgrade to Windows 10 and activate it using Windows 8 product key. http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-10/activation-in-windows-10


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Since you have Windows 8 key, as Manoj mentioned, I think the best way is to upgrade to Windows 8.1. You could follow steps in this link: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-in/windows-8/update-from-windows-8-tutorial In addition, you could also ask Asus manufacturer for further help.


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If you delete the drives you don't use or don't see, Make sure you delete the correct one (DO NOT DELETE C) and then right click and then extend drive add the moste you can and press DONE there you go!


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Another option, before you attempt anything more drastic, is to use BleachBit to remove temporary and other unneeded files. From wikipedia: BleachBit is a free and open-source disk space cleaner, privacy manager, and computer system optimizer. It should be in the package manager, so this should do it. sudo yum install bleachbit Or download from ...


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More general answer for LVM: Firstly - make sure you have additional unpartitioned storage. Then: Use fdisk to create new partition (safer than expanding existing one) Use pvcreate to create physical LVM volume: pvcreate /dev/sdxx Use vgextend to extend existing LVM group using new physical volume: vgextend groupname /dev/sdxx You can get group names ...


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The / filesystem may be a particular challenge, as that needs to be supported by the boot loader. This answer doesn't specify how to accomplish the requested task, but does provide a workaround. Another option: find a sub-directory (e.g., /big/) which has lots of data. Then copy that data onto your 60GB of space, mv the directory with lots of space (e.g., ...


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Good news! pvscan shows PV /dev/sda10 VG fedora lvm2 [141.56 GiB / 77.56 GiB free] — so you should be able to add up to 77.56GiB to any of your filesystems. I'd suggest adding it in smaller blocks (like 10GiB), so you have a reserve to put into /home if you decide you need growth there later. This is a relatively well-tested and generally safe operation, ...


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Use the s command in gdisk. The warning doesn't prevent you from using the command. It's just a warning. If you use s and then p, you'll probably find that the partitions are, indeed, sorted and ready to be written. Note that the "Sort" command does only what it says – it merely sorts the partition table entries to match the actual disk layout. It doesn't ...


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I had this problem when I removed a 4TB disk from a WD My Book external enclosure. The problem is: the MBR partition table is off by a factor of 8 and the MBR partition table cannot handle >2TB when the sector size is 512. Solution: Rewrite the partition table into a GPT, converting the values to use 512 byte sectors. In my case the partition started ...


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Variant C: Get a copy of GParted from www.gparted.org. Put the ISO on a USB-stick or CD. From a CMD-prompt with admin-rights run chkdsk /f on your C: and E: drives to make sure they are both without any problems. Install the new disk as extra disk in your system. Boot gparted from CD or USB stick Copy, using gparted your exisitng E: to the new disk. ...


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Variant A of your perceived solutions should work perfectly on the condition that the folder structure that currently exists on E is maintained on X (the new E). When you think about it, all the computer will "see" by the time you have finished is that partition E will be slightly smaller and partition C will be slightly bigger - as long as the registry ...


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After attempting several methods each within different cloning tools, even those suggested above (Clonezilla, Macrium Reflect, etc) with no luck, I finally came across a solution that worked very well, and required no special knowledge at all - HDD Raw Copy Tool 1.1. To elaborate... My wife's work laptop was painfully slow, so a couple years ago I cloned ...


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This can be done in the Disk management tool, by clicking on Change Drive Letter and Paths and then Remove. See also Change, add, or remove a drive letter.


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Hello vaas montenegro, Firstly to answer your questions: so my first question is can i make another partition separate from my data partition on the same hard drive and use that as windows partition without losing any data ? Yes, you can make another partition, but it is rather complicated and risky. You can use tools like "GParted" or similar to ...


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Linux is not perfectly handling NTFS filesystem, if your Filesystem is created with windows just follow this step on a windows PC: Execute diskmgmt.msc and detect the name of your External drive. Next step open the windows terminal and run this command : chkdsk /f your_drive_letter: Exemple : chkdsk /f E:


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Whatever a guide says, you should not blindly follow it. Especially if your image was not created according to that guide, otherwise you are going to lose data. There is no such thing as /dev/sda/sda3, only /dev/sda3. However, if the file contains whole disk image[1], including partition table, writing it to /dev/sda3 will not work, unless you intend to ...


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Unfortunately, my usb driver don't detect on CentOS7. Your USB driver is working perfectly fine. As is the USB drive. From you error message: Command-line `mount -t "ext4" -o "uhelper=udisks2,nodev,nosuid" ... So the disk is detected and an attempt is made to mount a disk with an EXT4 filesystem on it. This is my usb driver. That is an USB ...


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I believe I've found a simple solution for my problem. For anyone experiencing the same issues, here's how I did it: Format Recovery HD Expand Macintosh HD through Disk Utility (now possible since Recovery HD is empty). Simply clicking on the empty part of the pie that represents the recovery partition and hitting "minus". Recreate Recovery HD using ...


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Same situation. Rather than trying to force the upgrade after being stuck in the boot loop, I was OK with just going back to Yosemite and forgetting El Capitan ever existed. Surprisingly, this got me back to booting Yosemite: When presented with error message select Apple Menu -> Startup Disk ... -> Select HD -> Confirm Reboot Back to booting Yosemite like ...


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Disk First Aid might be reporting that the GPT partition table and the MBR partition table disagree with each other about your partition map. You can confirm this by typing fdisk /dev/disk0 from a terminal window. See if fdisk reports a different partition layout than diskutil does. Are you trying to recover the former Boot Camp partition or are you just ...


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Generally the end of the disk is the slowest part ( but not hugely so ). Given that an htpc isn't going to be accessing the OS drive much, this should not be a problem. If the drive were over 2 TB, and you were using bios instead of EFI, that would be a problem as bios can only access 2 TB, but since you are using EFI, you should be good.


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Most likely while adding and removing partitions you removed the 'bootable' flag in the partition table for the first partition. Standard MBR code will stop booting and display the message you mention if it can't find any partition that has a 'bootable' flag set.


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Unallocated space not appearing is not really a problem; many programs, including gdisk and diskutil, display only partitions, not unallocated space. Tools like GParted and cgdisk explicitly show unallocated space (although I think even GParted omits unallocated space below a certain size). There are two ways to define partition order: The order on the disk ...


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This is a bit weird how 10% of 1Tb filled 300Gb space. Nope. 100% of 1TB filled 300GB space and wanted more. Think of it as a notebook with 100 pages and notes on the first 10 pages. If you put the notebook on a Xerox style copier and copy the whole book you will end up with 100 new pages. Even if most of them are blank. Using dd is a RAW copy. It ...


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This is a known issue with Windows specifically. Windows treats USB flash drives differently than it treats USB hard drives. Flash drives are not "supposed" to be partitioned, therefore Windows only supports the first one. No other OS has this limitation. If you absolutely need to use multiple partitions in Windows, you must use a flash drive that has ...


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If your input device (if=) is 1TB in size, then our output file (of=) will also be 1TB. dd is a very low-level tool that simply copies ALL bytes from the input stream to the output stream, regardless of what the data is or whether it's even allocated. That even includes empty (0x00) sectors and those with garbage in them. It does not concern itself with ...


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dd copies the underlying disk directly, not the filesystem. It does not know about allocated blocks or unused space. If you want to capture just the filesystem, and it's a Linux EXTx filesystem that's not mounted, I'd suggest shrinking it down to minimum size (must be unmounted and fsck'd first) using resize2fs -M /dev/sd?? Then copy the partition the ...


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As I understands your requirement for a solution: You want a bootable usb stick with multiple linux distros on it. You can solve this by using grub2, gparted, and dd/unetbootin. 1: format and partition your usb drive to the fit your distro needs 2: install grub2 on your usb device to enable distro selection on boot. 3: copy/install distros into ...


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Windows can put a small paritition (usually 100MB) before your regular partition. It is highly likely that this is what you are refering to. This is used for stuff like bitlocker. In that case your bootloader could be on this partition. Therefore it is highly recommended NOT to delete that partition. Since removing the bootloader means your OS will no ...


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It is very likely you have four primary partitions. Output from Ubuntu's sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda (replace sda with proper name if necessary) would be very useful, but I'll try to help without it. As for now I can suggest a general scenario to cope with your problem. Have in mind I haven't tested it as a whole. Having no fdisk output yet, I will make some ...


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Both the 100MB NTFS and the 824MB partitions are automatically created by Windows. The first one keeps important files in order to allow your computer to boot in recovery mode (as mentioned here), and the second one stores small backups of your system, so you can go to a restore point in case your Windows starts having problems. You can't delete any of ...


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Rather than do all the tricky stuff that people are suggesting and since you have boot media. use the XP CD to boot into the recovery console. you should be able to format the logical partition and either xcopy or move the files in your Primary over to the Logical. from the command line. If the recovery CD cant see or access the files then a full install of ...


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For the sake of those that only have a single partition like I did, that you dont want to delete/format, you can shrink your existing partition with a 3rd party tool (I used one called AOMEI Partition Assistant, but there are several others). Once you've done that you can pickup from step 2 of @Kirk's answer to format that new partition (note, you dont ...


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You could use Disk Utility to restore from another partition, but the better answer (which is what I do myself) is to use Carbon Copy Cloner, Backup what you want to move to an external disk (I use a USB3 multiple bare mechanism mounter but any USB external drive would do just as well), then use the backed up partition (on the USB drive) to boot, format your ...


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I went ahead and converted the unlettered "OS" partition as follows: Right click partition in Disk Management and assign a temporary drive letter Z. Converted drive Z ("OS" partition) from FAT32 to NTFS. Removed drive letter Z from "OS" partition. Rebooted All is well. I was then able to configure and enable Bitlocker.


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Yes. If your machine can access it, any sufficiently privileged program running on the machine - including ransomware - can access it. Correctly-coded programs can access any volume with a Windows-compatible file system, even if it doesn't have a drive letter, with \\?\Volume{GUID} syntax. Alternatively, the program could inspect the output of mountvol and ...


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Most pre-installed Windows 10 use uefi with secure boot. I'm not very sure if kali supports secure boot or not but it definitely supports uefi. Also it seems that you are installing kali in legacy. For GRUB to appear, both os must be in either legacy or uefi. 1 : Restore you windows 10 using the steps you already mentioned. 2 : Disable secure boot from ...


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Remove the nonexistent device from /etc/crypttab. The file needs root permissions to edit. If doing the above doesn't fix your problem, it's possible that the decryption attempt is occurring in the initramfs. All you have to do in this case is regenerate your initramfs. In Debian/Ubuntu, run this command to regenerate the initramfs for the current ...


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The Intel 320 series SSD drives support the SET MAX ADDRESS command which means the previous owner may well have reduced the space available to the OS via some utility (e.g. hdparm). Here's the relevant excerpt from the 320 series specifications: The best way to recover this "lost" space is to boot a Linux Mint DVD/USB Key (so that the attached SSD drive ...


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The goal of persistance is to allow you to keep the content of one folder (for instance /home) across reboots. You cannot have persistance on the whole system because it is stored in an ISO file that gets loaded when you boot. What you are looking for is to do a full install of Kali on USB stick. In that way, you'll be able to access the whole file system, ...


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The partition table written with Windows 7 is most likely the GPT type, which Windows XP (32bit) does not support. It is known that XP will show GPT-partitioned space as one large partition with no logical volumes. An option would be to install Windows XP 64-bit edition (if your CPU supports that). It works with 32bit XP serial keys just fine, and does ...


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Partition Master download (free version): http://www.partition-tool.com/download.htm


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The reason why Windows won’t let you shrink the volume is as the message shown in Disk Management suggested, because there are immovable system files at the very end of the volume, as this screenshot from utility shows us. there are multiple things you could try to work this around. Run the Disk Cleanup Wizard, making sure to remove the hibernation file ...


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MS's Disk Management never shrinked right for me, usually having this kind of problems. I'd try a different program, my best experience is with MiniTool Partition Wizard Free. Since it's your system disk, you'd better do it from some live environment (such as some Windows PE environment if you have a license for that and use MiniTool Partition Wizard Free or ...


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I recommend truncate instead of quirky dd command that creates 3GiB sparse file + 1 byte zeros. truncate use sparse file as well. With -s 3G you get a image of precisely 3GiB sparse file with no zeros (or you can use count=0 for dd too): I prefer doing it "in-place" with truncate, since cat would convert the sparse file to zeros (although that might be ...


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Never tested the described way, but if your deal with an SD-Card, the following works for me. dd the image unchanged to the sdcard with dd if=my.img of=/dev/mmcblk0 bs=1M sync after that Use fdisk to delete the 2nd partition. Then create a new partition and accept all defaults. Then write the partition table. sync again Check the filesystem with e2fsck -f ...


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"Before the install I disconnected the Hard Drive (with Windows install) and repluged it once I was able to boot on the SSD." If you did this, then it is safe to delete those 2 partitions. "EFI System Partition and Reserved Partition."


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First, check that your vm system truly does not support EFI, as it will make this much simpler. Assuming that it does not, we'll have to convert the disk to MBR labeling, as that's required for BIOS+MBR booting. diskpart's convert mbr can do that. Remember to load the windows MBR. Since we already have a small partition (the ESP) that can hold boot-related ...


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Figured I would come back here to answer this. The first sector of an extended partition is the first "EBR" or Extended Boot Record, containing the information about the first logical partition in the extended partition pool, as well as a pointer to/location of the next EBR. Hence, these EBR's form a linked list. Therefore, when the OS enumerates partitions ...



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