New answers tagged

0

I've suffered the same with Easus sofyware, bought another HD and installed Win 10 on that. Now looking at the failed HD which is still connectedn seems all exe files are missing, but when trying to reuse using Acronis Disk Director 12 it just will not access the faulty HD. So have given up and removed Easus software. sorry not helping.


1

You haven't said how old your motherboard is, or what features it supports. Mokubai may be correct, but if your computer was introduced in mid-2011 or later, it may already use UEFI firmware, which supports booting from a GPT disk. Even a few older motherboards use EFI. You'll need to re-install in EFI mode, though; most EFIs include a Compatibility Support ...


0

Chances are your other FAT partitions are not included in the hybrid MBR, which is a topic you MUST understand if you're to do anything remotely unusual on a dual-boot of OS X and Windows 7. See this page of mine for more information: http://www.rodsbooks.com/gdisk/hybrid.html In brief, a hybrid MBR takes up to three GPT partitions and "mirrors" them in ...


0

It is "fixed" in recent util-linux (as of 2.26-rc1): Kay reported that Windows 8.1 installed does not recognize GPT created by libfdisk, but parted works as expected. It seems (according to the header hexdump) that the problem is HeaderSize GPT field where libfdisk uses 512 (header + reserved area), but parted uses 92. The both is pretty ...


0

After comparing behaviour with that with parted that I used previously, it appears the buggy UEFI rejects partition tables with a header length of 512, which the standard permits: Size in bytes of the GPT Header. The HeaderSize must be greater than or equal to 92 and must be less than or equal to the logical block size. After modifying util-linux ...


2

I have had this happen to me once before. The solution on that machine was to edit the boot order of the BIOS, so that the hard drive was the first boot option (In fact, if I remember rightly I moved the USB device to the very last option in the boot order priorities). After saving that, I booted from the USB by pressing F10 (motherboard specific) and doing ...


0

When you install an OS from external media, like USB for example, you have two options how to boot media (on UEFI capable firmware): UEFI way BIOS/legacy way For GPT disks (not MBR style disks!) choose always UEFI way of booting - then installer for any OS (Windows, Linux, etc.) should create installation which is UEFI bootable (boot files are stored to ...


1

Quite simply your motherboard is too old. Buy (or use) a smaller drive as your boot disk and use the new one for bulk storage. From Table 3: Windows support for combinations of boot firmware and partitioning schemes for the boot volume at Windows support for hard disks that are larger than 2 TB Microsoft does not support BIOS + GPT as a boot volume, nor ...


0

I had the same error on Ubuntu. I reformatted my partitions. After I reformatted my main partition I was able to install Ubuntu. I guess try reformatting all the partitions manually. The file system may be corrupted or encrypted. My file system was encrypted from a prior installation of Ubuntu. On Ubuntu I reformatted my main partition with ext4. Went into ...


0

Finally I figured out that when I used chrome recovery utility to install chromium os, it must have changed my pen partition. Later when I format it with usb tools like rufus and universal installer, and also bootice as well, but none were able to show my pen drive on explorer. I was about to download window 7 usb creator tool but I again Googled and some ...


0

They might be different partitions on the same disk. It's normal for any linux installer to create multiple partitions. Changing the partitioning scheme in fstab won't make your server any more secure, I would recommend you don't edit it unless you know exactly what you need to change and why. This article explains partitioning in linux pretty well. Just ...


1

Clone your Windows partition. Shrink Debian partition and resize Windows partition to according to your needs Format Windows partition and restore from clone. If you aren't sure about which tool to use I can recommend PartedMagic as it contains all the tools you'll need. (Clonezilla and GParted)


1

Use GParted from a live CD to resize and move partitions.


0

I had this issue when I had a hard drive in a dock plugged into a SS USB Port. I changed to a standard USB port and worked like a charm. This was odd though because this only happened sometimes in the SS USB Port. But hope this helps! Thanks.


-1

In almost all of the dual boot systems I have reinstalled a host, standalone Windows OS on over GRUB it has written over with the Windows bootloader. So the answer to your question, I believe, is yes, it will solve your problem. You just need to make sure that your Windows bootloader gets installed over GRUB (which I think will happen whenever you tell the ...


0

Yes, kind of. If you delete a partition, the memory associated with it will be added to the unallocated space and can than be used to expand some of the other partitions. The catch is that it needs to be continuous space. So for example, C: can extend the unallocated space below it and the NTFS partition in the blue box below it, but not the D: drive.


0

using dd to copy partition to another partition, while using physical drive Assuming you have a layout that looks like this: 1 TB = sda, two partitions, sda1 that you booted from and sda2 that you are dd'ing to 320 GB = sdb, one partition, sdb1 that you are dd'ing from Your command would look like this: dd if=/dev/sdb1 of=/dev/sda2 bs=1M The bs=1M ...


2

Well, the disk0s2 partition has a wrong/bogus partition type GUID. If that was a modern CoreStorage partition, its GUID should be: 53746F72-6167-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC If that was an older HFS+ partition, its GUID should be: 48465300-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC I don't have any advice for how to fix the GUID type back to what it should be, other than, "Be ...


0

The HFS+ files system was developed by Apple. This proprietary directory structure cannot be read by Windows OS's "out of the box", but there are a number of applications that can be used to read and write to that file system: Since you already use Paragon HFS+ , you might try their application for Windows OS. Catacombae HFSExplorer is a free tool, but ...


0

Maybe Recuva can help you. It saved my HDD's life once, so I keep it installed just in case...


1

You'll need the filesystem unmounted, but you don't need to actually use a live CD. A live CD is just convenient when the filesystem is /. (I haven't tried this, but I believe you could actually do it online if you didn't mind destroying the filesystem.) Any should work, as long as it has new enough tools (and, I suppose theoretically maybe not too new). ...


0

This seems very unfortunate, @goalsetter88! I'd recommend you to backup your data from the array somewhere else before proceeding. Getting rid of all the partitions would require you to erase everything on the HDDs. As the guys above already mentioned, in order to use the full 3 TB capacity, you'd need to re-initialize the HDDs in GPT, instead of MBR (due ...


3

Your /dev/md1 appears to be a combination of two partitions, each 16 GiB in size (or possibly different sizes which add up to 32 GiB). Output from fdisk -l added afterward contradicts that. Without a complete history we can only speculate what led to the present condition of /dev/md1, but one possibility is that the partition tables changed after the RAID ...


1

I believe the primary partition where you've originally installed the first OS does not hide the secondary partition by default. If the dual boot works and you want their respective OS to see their respective drive, you can hide the partition In Win7 > right-click Computer > Manage Storage > Disk Management Right-click DriveD in the console > Change Drive ...


2

To respond to the general question in your title, you can do that with a "portable" application. Those are designed to operate without installation. If you can see it in the other OS's partition, you can run it. Unfortunately, Office 2007 is not a portable app. Not only does it need the hooks and registry entries from installation, Microsoft sort of ...


2

What you could try is to install it in one of the partitions (say, Windows 10) and then again in the other, but in that one, point it to the existing directory where it was installed in the first OS. Note that if you have to uninstall it from the first OS, you will have to run a repair install (or uninstall/install again) in the second if you wish to keep ...


0

Gparted & Windows handle partition data differently. What passes in Linux as valid sometimes doesn't in Windows. It's frustrating. You should be able to modify the RAW partition using TestDisk such that Windows once again sees it as FAT32. Extra details are provided step-by-step here. Relevant excerpts: Select the disk type (Intel or EFI GPT ...


0

You may be able to do it using a combination of tools: GParted -- This Linux tool should enable you to shrink the Windows partition and create a new one in the free space. It will, however, wipe out the hybrid MBR that your system probably relies upon to enable Windows to boot. If you don't normally run Linux, you could run GParted from an Ubuntu ...


0

No ! Don't ever let Windows touch the partitioning. Tears will ensue. It simply does not understand how Boot Camp has fooled it into believing it's on an MBR disk. Disk Utility will not let you add a new Partition either. 4 is your max without some very tricky Terminal juggling. I'd leave it alone unless you are very confident in Terminal. iPartition is ...


1

This is a very simple do as you've already done most of the work. All you need now, is a Partition Manager that support formatting HFS. Google for it or start with this list: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_disk_partitioning_software Some things off the top of my head: MacDrive and TransMac. Both have limited time evaluation trials. Live CD of ...


2

Yes, if the sector size is actually 4 KiB, the maximum MBR partition size will be 16 TiB. (By the is in those units I mean the power-of-two definition, of which the everyday power-of-1000 definition is an approximation.) The size of an MBR partition is determined by the address of its first sector its length in sectors, which are stored in the partition ...


0

I would point out that partitioning is never a 100% safe activity. It's always a good idea to have a backup of your entire drive before engaging in any form of partitioning, not that most people actually do it. When you are unable to make changes to partitions, using Disk Management below. 1 GParted One of the more advanced options for resizing your ...


0

It is possible to do this. There are 3 parts to LVM - The Physical Volume The Volume Group Logical Volumes So the way I would do this is to create a partition on the second disk (you don't need to do this, but its the "correct" way to do it) First instruct the Operating system that you have 2 Physical Volumes you wish to assign to LVM - you do this by ...


0

You don't need it anymore. Windows 10 has a reset option that restores your installation, optionally preserving certain files. In the worst case scenario where your Windows is corrupted and/or can't boot you might need the installation media to perform the reset. If you are intent on having a restore solution without external media you can also try booting ...


0

To update the current recovery partition you may have to delete the partition and merge it with any other partition. Then you can create a new recovery partition using AOMEI OneKey Recovery by following this guide. This way you will be able to create all the drivers as well as the installed programs from the newly created recovery. You can also use the ...


0

Problem confirmed on a Win10 Pro x64. An 8GB Fat32 USB drive was not recognized. Connecting the drive to a Linux OS based CPU had no problem reading the FAT32 USB drive. But, FAT, FAT32, and exFAT are supported by Win10. The USB was formatted using Win7 in FAT32. The problem is also confirmed on a Win10 Pro x86 (32 bit) machine. Formatting of the USB drive ...


1

The option to extend the system partition in disk management control panel will be grayed out if the unallocated space is not contiguous--that is, the byte ranges are separated by other partitions, often a recovery partition or similar. You can get around this limitation by using partition management software such as Gparted. However, there is some risk ...


0

Your best bet is to remove the hard drive and move it to another functioning computer to recover the data at a byte level. The data itself will be fine even if the partition table is corrupted (assuming you weren't using full hard drive encryption). Once you've backed up your data, then do a low-level format on the drive and a fresh install of your ...


0

I downloaded a free deep scan tool which tries to make sense of the residue on the "clean" drive. It found ~30tb of data on my ~2tb drive so that was weird but I still got a lot of good data back. -Safe partitioning


0

This is doable. Driveletters are not changed unless you do it yourself or you remove/create a partition. So what you would want to do is move all data from the C drive to the D drive (or an external backup if its too much data) and prepare to remove the C partition entirely, then use software such as Partition Magic to resize the D partition. By using ...


0

Try creating the drive image from linux, with dd or some gui tools that can make images (like Disks / gnome-disk-utility). Even while running windows, if you ran linux in a Virtual Machine and can directly read the USB drive, that should work. I know there are some ext drivers available for Windows, I tried a few and some worked, some didn't. Just seeing ...


1

why does it seem to be a good choice to leave those gaps on the drive? That seems to be a use of "guard bands". Sometimes I'd see the (intentional?) non-allocation of the last track or two at the end of a partition. In theory they should not be necessary. For a hard disk drive, partitions used to be allocated to start on a cylinder boundary. Such an ...


2

This is to do with partition alignment. Essentially, under the hood, your hard drive is divided into sectors. Whenever the hard drive performs an operation, it acts on the entire sector at once; that is to say, when it reads any data that is stored within a sector, it must read the entire sector. If data is split over multiple sectors, it must read the ...


0

try gparted running on bare metal rather than in a VM. if that doesn't work, you almost certainly just need to buy a new one. http://download.cnet.com/GParted-Live/3000-2094_4-10698802.html


2

If you reformat the C partition, you will lose your restore points. This is the only partition where they are kept. If you want to preserve system status at certain times, I recommend you make occasional images. The free Macrium program is a good tool for that. Macrium is preferred over the Windows imaging because it has more function, is more flexible and ...


0

Well, have you try "image" solutions? WARNING! Since what we do here is messing with Windows partition. Use This Solution at Your Own Risk What you need is: List item A Flash Drive with PE Utility on it. You can use Gandalf Win8.1 PE. http://www.software182.com/2015/01/gandalfs-windows-pe.html#axzz3y5lMwvkF External Drive. HDD Recommended. Ghost32 ...


1

It's because Windows backup uses a variable size VHD file as its container. A variable sized VHD (Dynamic VHD) is limited to 2088958MB. Source You can either selectively backup only 2TB - 2MB (which is where the above number comes from) of data, or use a different backup scheme. Alternatively, you can capture the filesystem in a compressed wim, hopfully ...


0

You need to boot using UEFI. Actually, your bootable DVD/USB Flash Drive should support UEFI boot. Boot from DVD ROM I guess Windows DVD ISO supports both UEFI boot and BOIS (legacy) boot, so if you are installing windows from a DVD-Drive, you should select a boot option that supports UEFI. You need to do it in the BOIS boot menu (by pressing F12 or F11 ...


0

You can override the geometry using e.g. fdisk -H 32 -S 32 /dev/sda. This will cause all cylinders to be 512k long. Since partitions in the msdos partitioning scheme begin on cylinder boundaries, this is a somewhat nifty way of ensuring all partitions are properly aligned for most SSDs (except the first partition, which is offset by one track to reserve room ...


0

Each partition cannot be longer than 2TB. This is because 2TB (roughly) is the maximum size that can be specified by to bytes 9 through 12, which is the starting sector in LBA format. Then, bytes 13-16 can specify the size, which must be 4,294,967,295 sectors or smaller, which is 2,199,023,255,040 bytes if each sector is 512 bytes (which was the most ...



Top 50 recent answers are included