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1

To return freed space was held by deleted partition you can either work from Windows with something like Partition Wizard or from Ubuntu with Gparted. Returning space means resize, and often, moving the partitions. The last one is just copying itself. So be ready it may take a few hours. Also you can run Linux's Gparted from Live CD of a variety linux ...


1

if I delete it then will those free space goes split other drives or will just uninitialized Deleting a partition will free up the space that was held by that partition. It will not automatically add the space to any other partition. In Windows, you will see this as a black bar in Disk Management. You can create another partition from this unallocated ...


2

I had the same problem. Running the command sudo gdisk -l /dev/sda indicated that I have both MBR and GPT tables present. This happened because I had originally Windows 8 pre-installed on my computer. Windows 8 uses GPT scheme. I installed windows 7 over it. Windows 7 is using MBR and finally my disk end up being MBR with some stray GPT data on it. ...


1

sr0 is your optical device, i.e. the dvd drive. There is a 1 under the RM because it is a removable drive. It has a 0 under the RO column because it is not a read-only device. It is of type rom because it is not a disk, but a DVD/CD-ROM device, i.e., an optical device. sda4 is a 1k partition because it is only a shell of a partition. Old-fashioned disks, ...


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Ok the problem was that I don't have the windows 8 CD for this setup (nor a CD driver for that matter). I found a solution though. F12 during boot brings up an option to select where to boot from, and I found an option in the end that started the windows repair which fixed the issue.


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sr0 usually refers to optical media drives. I don't know why the partitioning left this 1K partition On lsblk --help it states MAJ:MIN major:minor device number. It just sounds like an identifier, but no idea if it has any use.


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You will be fine even with 1GiB (and likely less) of swap. My work computer typically uses no more than 140-150 MiB. A gigabyte is plenty of over-provisioning for that. Unless you do compute tasks that require datasets in the hundreds of gigabytes and (this one is important!) data is accessed in a more or less access-once fashion, you will never want to have ...


1

A much better idea than having "a lot of swap" is (re-)organizing your work so that the working sets fit in memory, then using the file-system to store and retrieve the work you do. I.e., instead of forcing the OS to guess what your memory usage patterns will be, use what you know about your problems to control your memory usage patterns. As a random ...


9

On Linux, you need enough swap so that the total virtual memory available (RAM + SWAP) is enough for all the processes you want to run at once and their maximum virtual footprint. If you have less swap than this, or no swap at all, then the following situation happens: the system runs out of memory trying to allocate a page. But, this is still a soft ...


2

The workload you want to apply to the machine needs a certain amount of memory to run (remember to add enough to the equation to handle peak loads), and you need to configure your computer to have at least that. Modern operating systems provide virtual memory as a combination of physical memory and swap space, so if you need more memory than the machine ...


2

As the others mentioned, a swap partition is a good idea even if you have plenty of RAM. It's not a good idea to put it on an SSD; the frequent writes of a swap partition will eventually wear out your drive. If you have a spare USB 3.0 port, I would suggest using a flash drive for your swap space. There are plenty of high-speed flash drives that are as fast ...


3

There are more considerations. If you need/want suspend to work then you need at least the size of your RAM and then some. However it sounds unlikely you need it given that you seem to mainly build a computational work horse. In this case please consider using a swap file instead of a partition. You don't need to worry about sizing much, getting rid of or ...


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RedHat recommends 4GB on a machine with 64GB https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/6/html/Installation_Guide/s2-diskpartrecommend-ppc.html#id4394007 However, sizing swap is more of an art than a science. It depends on what the machine is being used for, how much disk space and memory you have, and other factors. Remember, ...


24

You probably only need a small amount of swap. When you have sufficient RAM for your computer's typical working set, which I'm pretty sure you do, you only need swap for two things: You need swap to get information that will likely never be accessed out of RAM to free up more space for disk cache. Many applications run on system startup and will never be ...


2

Download Gparted or Aomei. Move your G, F and E partitions across your unallocated space. Now your unallocated space will be next to your C partition. After this you may be able to extend C partition either by the downloaded 3rd party or your disk manager.


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I would try using GParted, the Windows version to see if you can move some of the unallocated space to the C:. It's fairly easy to use.


0

If all you need is to look up some files, you can easily mount the .vmdk file in your own Linux, without any need of a VM: losetup /dev/loop0 /path/to/your/file.vmdk losetup -o 32256 /dev/loop1 /dev/loop0 mount /dev/loop1 /your/mount/point The trick lies in the offset, 32256 in this case. This will work for the first partition, but if you do not wish ...


1

Create a Crashbang Linux VM, boot your VM from is and then mount either the VMDK or the original backup as a secondary volume. See from page 7 of the VMWare userguide on how to mount an image as a separate partition this here.


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Yes, partitioning can easily be done in Windows 7. Click Start Right click Computer Click Manage Click Disk Management Right click your 500GB disk at bottom of screen. (Right click the space in use). Click Shrink volume Follow wizard to shrink the 500 down to your required size (485GB to give 15GB free space). I'm concerned that when you use the space ...


0

There is a tool that you can use called aomei partition assistant You can use this to view the partitions on the HDD and you can also delete them. Give it a go and let me know how it works.


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There is a tool that you can use called aomei partition assistant You can use this to view the partitions on the USB flash drive and you can also delete them. Give it a go and let me know how it works.


1

DISKPART list disk view USB disk number and type number in select disk select disk 1 all partition delete in disk 1: clean


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How can I remove a partition using GParted? Follow these steps: On the GParted main screen, select the drive from the dropdown list on the top-right corner of the GUI. By default GParted selects the first drive connected to your system, e.g. /dev/sda. Once on the partitions scheme view you can select any partition you want either from the graphic at ...


0

When installing a Linux on any Windows/Linux mix you install Linux SECOND because it installs GRUB as the bootloader which can find your Windows install and it then chainloads to the Windows bootloader correctly. You then get the choice of OSes. For your situation you need to go to your Mint install and install GRUB and do a GRUB update so it locates your ...


1

Your easiest path at this point is to do a BIOS/CSM/legacy-mode install of Ubuntu. You can probably do this by selecting a boot option for your installation medium that does not include the word "EFI" or "UEFI." The result will be just as if you were using an older BIOS-only computer. The biggest drawback to this will be slightly longer boot times than you'd ...


0

Dell devices come with a software called Dell Backup and Recovery. Run the tool, create a full backup of the HDD, store the image on a second PC and also create a recovery media to be able to restore he image later. When you want Windows 8 back, just restore the Image.


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There's an easy way. Head to Disk Management Right click on the drives that you want the free space to merge into. Select Extend Drives Choose the Free Space drive from the selection box. Voila! You're done


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If you keep your recovery partition and create any appropriate recovery discs, then you will always be able to restore your machine to its delivered state. This will lose anything else on the hard disc. If it were me, I would shrink the W8 partition to ~50GB and give the rest of the disc over to Ubuntu to give a dual-boot system. That way I can always ...


0

Yes. Just make a recovery Disk of you windows drive and after replace Windows with Ubuntu! FYI to make a back up disk: Control pannel > System and security > Back up your computer


0

For your Windows key, if the laptop came with Windows 8 and there is a windows logo sticker on the bottom then the windows key is stored on the motherboard. This can be retrieved with some tools. For Windows itself, you can simply put an .iso on an usb stick and reinstall Windows from that. So you can safely wipe the whole disk. But only if you are 100% ...


1

It is you to decide if you want boot to be based on UEFI or on BIOS=CSM=legacy. It seems Windows 8.1 is installed in BIOS/MBR mode. You can install Ubuntu also in BIOS/MBR mode. To convert Windows 8.1 BIOS/MBR installation to UEFI/GPT you need: Do 1), 2) and 3) with Ubuntu Live CD/DVD/USB 1) convert existing disk to GPT 2) delete BOOT (1,5GB) ...


1

If OpenSuse doesn't have gparted in it you can download it from Gparted site. Also you can boot up your machine from Gparted Live CD How two operate in Gparted you can find in these to threads below: http://askubuntu.com/questions/51272/how-do-i-repartition-with-gparted http://askubuntu.com/questions/126153/how-to-resize-partitions Also after installing ...


1

AFH has the right answer although I would say that installing Windows first and then installing Linux to another partition is easier then the other way around. One alternative is to use a virtual machine (like Virtual Box) running in Linux to install Windows to. Then you don't have to worry about partitioning.


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Try to truncate the file to the exceeding block count and then remount. In your situation: EXT4-fs (loop0) : bad geometry: block count 29009610 exceeds size of defice (1679229 blocks) truncate -o -s 29009610 /path/to/disk.img mount -o loop /path/to/disk.img /mng/image Flavio


0

You may want to use either a Linux Live USB or CD to boot on a complete live OS, alternatively, and if you're not interested in installing any Linux distribution, you can download and burn GParted which is a tool to manage partitions and filesystems. On the link provided you can download an standalone ISO, which is a bootable operating system that contains ...


0

What are you trying to do? Because I see two options: Option 1: You already have installed Fedora on the disk /dev/sda, on the first partition. You have some free space in /dev/sda2 You have some free space in /dev/sdb1 And you want to combine these two partitions in a mirror. Option 2: You have installed Fedora on the first disk (in the first partition) ...


0

To me, definitely risky while a system is mounted. If you can take a downtime, I would suggest using gparted. Boots up into a mini kernel and lets you resize partitions. Still a bit risky, so of course make sure you have good backups!


0

Nevertheless in Windows run chkdsk /f


0

Run the command sudo smartctl --all /dev/sda, it will show any SMART diagnostic messages for that drive.


0

If you can't get it from backup, I recommend SpinRite at GRC.com for $89 USD. Written by Security Now's Steve Gibson, SpinRite can be used on any operating system and any file system. This means it can run on drives formatted with Windows XP's/Vista's/Windows 7's NTFS and all other older FAT formats (in addition to all Linux, Novell, and all other file ...


0

I don't really understand what "format that system image onto the same HDD" means, but in general, a good technique to migrate to a new drive is: Grab EASEUS Partition Master. Connect your new drive to the computer in addition to your current drive. In Partition Master, select your current disk, then choose "copy", and select the new disk as the ...


1

Check out http://sourceforge.net/projects/gujin/ It's getting a 5-star rating and supports mouse input to select the OS / kernel you want to load.


1

I shrinked 150 GB out of my 500 GB hard space by windows 7 It seems you shrinked about 240 GB, not 150 GB. Now some amount of that 150GB is free and I need to have it back on my windows. How? as space on C: partition (extend): this is not possible without formatting Ubuntu partition as another partition: this may be possible: get an Ubuntu ...


0

It should. The recovery partition simply acts as a disk image of what your system was like at the factory. As long as you don't shrink your main drive beyond the space needed for the factory image, you should be fine.


0

so for everyone running into the same problems I will explain the answer I found: As already mentioned in the comments the Main Boot Record (mbr) was erased. This happened because the mbr, in all standard installations, is found on the primary hard disk (sda in my case). Thus my lightheaded use of gparted destroyed this record. The solution is to ...


7

Currently, your Windows is installed on the HDD. It can't be on SSD, because only 2 GB are used. Right-click My Computer and choose Manage. Then go to Disk Management. You will see the list of hard drives and the partitions on each. The partition with the System flag is the partition on which Windows is installed. Look then to see if it is on SSD.


2

You seem to have 1 HDD of 1TB a DVD drive and an SSD drive. The SSD has only 2 gig in use and on top of that, the OS is usually always installed on the C drive, which is not your SSD in your case. And no, a store will not install an OS to the SSD unless you tell them to because the OS is already preinstalled. So they only unpack the box, open up the ...


0

I've done this several times. Simply put: Boot up into Ubuntu, it should be installed as a standalone OS, in dualboot. Format or remove your windows installation partition (where C: is mounted). Make Ubuntu regenerate the GRUB config and the menu. sudo grub2-install /dev/sda; sudo grub2-mkconfig -o <grub_config_file>. Don't reboot if the GRUB hasn't ...


0

Do not shrink C drive (it is not the last partition, the new created partitions will end up in the middle of the hard drive which most probably will alter the partition table). Shrink D:. Shrink it and let unallocated space. Install Linux on the unallocated space (select custom partition scheme at the installer and manually create an ext4 partition and swap ...


1

Before performing this task, it's highly recommended that you backup your data. You cannot resize the partition under the Operating System working/running from the same partition. Boot with Live CD of any linux OSm such as Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian and others, and run Gparted. Or even boot with Gparted Live As Gparted moves partitions, not unallocated space, ...



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