Tag Info

New answers tagged

-2

You may download third party tools like recuva and restore deleted and undeleted files along with directory structure (by changing setting of recuva). Then you may format the disk. Alternatively there are other tools available for recovering data from corrupt disks. You may use any of them and copy data to some other storage device then format the D drive


2

I don’t believe that Windows XP can handle 3TB drives, but according to this article in PC World: If you want to use the 3TB Barracuda on a Windows XP system, then you will need to run Seagate's DiskWizard program to make the drive usable under that operating system. Now I know you have a Western Digital drive—and that solution refers to a Seagate ...


0

It turns out that I accidentally chose some partition other than /dev/sda as the location for the boot loader during the Xubuntu installation, and that was the reason why I never saw the grub menu at boot time. I re-installed Xubuntu with /dev/sda as the boot loader location and it works fine now.


0

On another system, prepare a live CD containing TestDisk, and boot the problem system with it. You should be able to use it to find and restore your partitions and partition table.


0

If you boot from a thumb-drive, for some reason macos won't always boot normal next time around. Hold down the option key during boot and the macos disk will show up as a bootable drive. Just click it.


1

What is meant by Packing a number of logical records into physical blocks mean here? First you have to understand what a "logical record" is. It can be variable length, such as text in sentences. Of it can be fixed length, such as a data structure. Packing determines how to organize data in the form of these logical records into "physical" ...


3

It's actually really simple, yet hard to explain. I think we just need to paraphrase what the author already said. The disk demands that you talk to it in blocks. Assuming the block size is 512 Bytes: If you want to write 400 Bytes to disk, you must add another 112 Bytes to make up 512 Bytes. The extra 112 Bytes may as well be zeros, but they have to be ...


1

…I tried to transfer data back and restore my Mac but it’s come up with that case sensitive. This description of the issue confuses me a bit, but I think I understand what has happened. When you took your Mac in for repair and they had to wipe everything and now when you took it back home you found out the system hard drive is now formatted as a case ...


2

Never let your hard drive get more than 70% full. If you study queuing theory, under most conditions, the wait time vs service load curve has a knee in the curve that skyrockets to long wait times when the load factor reaches the neighborhood of 70%.


0

Piping commands to fdisk works well as explained by other people, but this way a bit more elegant and readable: fdisk /dev/sdc <<EOF n p 1 w EOF Piping from a (temporary) file also works: fdisk /dev/sdc < /tmp/fdisk.cmds


0

Have you used gparted before (http://gparted.org)? I highly recommend it and it's free. I would boot into a gparted live CD and resize the partitions from there with a nice, friendly GUI (make sure Windows has shut down cleanly beforehand and isn't in hibernate etc). Your UUID shouldn't change, but after resizing the partitions, you should run sudo blkid ...


1

Moving the files from the "Program Files" directory will definitely not work. Most programs such as Office and VS have registry files also associated with them, which will be rendered completely useless if you move files. As you said your drive is just 40GB, I presume you haven't installed many programs on your OS. If you have the time, you could uninstall ...


1

For the program files, there is always a risk involved: There are LOTS of programs out there, that have C: hardcoded. This sometimes poses a risk also for user profiles. To work around this, I typically use junctions and mount another partition on the corresponding directories.


3

This problem is resolved in my 10 years old HP desktop (4 cores), with drive: 3TB Western Digital Green, but it should be the same with Seagate too. I added the solution to this blog: Post Anything Here. In a nutshell you need 2 things to do: to install the Intel RAID driver (free). to use a good tool for extending the partition to the maximum size, ...


0

This problem is resolved in my 10 years old HP desktop (4 cores, Windows 7 - 32 bits), exactly with your kind of drive: 3TB Western Digital Green. I added the solution to this blog: Post Anything Here. In a nutshell you need 2 things to do: to install the Intel RAID driver (free). to use a good tool for extending the partition to the maximum size, like ...


0

You need to use the recovery kit maker from Asus called 'Backtracker' Its obscure but here is a direct link to the website. http://www.asus.com/support/FAQ/1008641/ Be careful of course when using it and make sure you read the instructions


2

The reason XP shows the disk as 745 GB has to do with the limits of MBR partitioning (XP does not support GPT partitioning). With MBR partitioning you can only have 2^32 blocks of 512 bytes each; that is about 2 TB, hence the 2 TB limit. Worse: Even before any partition table entries are created, the 3 TB drive's capacity is reported by the drive as ...


0

You can easily do this on Linux using mdadm. Note, though, that if you go with RAID5 using your 7 partitions, you would still only be able to survive the loss of a single partition. Lose your 1.5 TB drive, for example, and your array is unrecoverable. If instead, you went with the following: create 2 x 700 GB partitions on 1.5 TB drive create 2 x 700 GB ...


0

I would recommend booting into a linux based rescue OS from a USB stick and use linux tools to repartition - they tend to be more reliable than windows tools from my experience. Knoppix is one free example I have used previously: http://www.knopper.net/knoppix/index-en.html You can then use the included tools fdisk or gparted to repartition drives without ...


0

Because Henrik Carlqvist's answer seemed to "advanced" for my skills, I tried to just remove the mint partition in a live Gparted usb session, which showed this image But that was still inaccurate, because the 39.47 GB space of the mint partition appears both inside and outside the extended partition, but also outside of the 100 GB space of the ex-Win7 ...


0

It was the hardware, but not the disk nor partitions fault. Probably the motherboard is damaged so the PC cannot wake up from sleep mode. What's important here - the attempts to use the broken sleep function are very harmful and dangerous. My system partition was damaged beyond repair twice when I tested STR feature. It's probably caused by performing hard ...


1

Thanks for the xxd output. By converting it back to a binary file with xxd -r and studying that file with sfdisk I see the following: Device Boot Start End #cyls #blocks Id System xxd.bin1 * 25+ 23161- 23137- 185841664 7 HPFS/NTFS xxd.bin2 23161+ 29510- 6349- 50996224 7 HPFS/NTFS xxd.bin3 29510+ 47663- ...


1

From /proc/partitions we can see the following: 1) You have 4 primary partitions (1-4). A DOS partition table can have up to 4 primary partitions which in Linux is numbered 1-4. One of those primary partitions can be an extended partition containing more partitions. Your partition number 3 is an extended partition. 2) You have 2 logical partitions in your ...


0

Ok, after having done another backup of my data, I went back to Windows. In the built in partition utility, the HDD was marked as an invalid drive. I right-clicked on it and choose... well I don't remember the exact wording, but it kind of re-mounted the drive. And instead of just formatting the drive, now I can see the three Ubuntu partition (boot, swap and ...


0

You cannot install GParted on Mac OSX. You will have to use the Live Version. This is according to the GParted website itself. Here is a screenshot of it: You can definitely find GParted alternatives for Mac OSX here. I found something interesting here, that parted does not even compile for Mac OSX. Hope this helps!


0

I just found an similar topic and the solution I see in my case is finding an additional device connected to the router that should run TrueCrypt connected directly with the HDD (not sure if it's possible to run the TrueCrypt within the router).


-1

Perhaps it is an option to buy a HDD with internal hardware encryption. I'm did not understand how you access the HDD from your PC. If you use CIFS, you can use Symantec PGP. This software can encryp files on network shares. You can define directories on a network share and configure which data will be encrypted and which not. Have a look here: ...


1

I suggest to use GPT, because it is the newer partition style. Linux supports GPT. The filesystem depends what are planing to do and what are your security concerns. I would recommend ntfs, when you use this 1000 GB disk only a data pool. This filessystem is reachable from both OSs.


1

Here is what you should do for your 1TB Drive with a Single Partition to work on Ubuntu and Windows: Ubuntu allows writing files to NTFS out of the box. Windows supports NTFS to it's full capacity of course, as it's their own Microsoft technology. Since the partition on the drive is going to be NTFS, and it's going to be the only partition, you should use ...


0

In the vast majority of systems the only purpose for an ESP is for booting. Normally only one drive in a system needs an ESP; this will be the drive set as the "drive to boot from" in the firmware settings. Unless you want to fiddle with your firmware settings so as to boot from different drives' ESPs at different times, nothing will ever use the ESPs from ...


0

You need to fix the MBR (Master Boot Record) to be able to boot Windows 8.1 again. Here is a quick guide on how to do it


1

NB: As Zoredache points out in the comment, when you are shrinking things, you must first resize the filesystem, then the underlying block devices, otherwise you will likely lose data. In general, resizing a block device does not resize any filesystem that may be resident on your block device. So, if you used lvresize to resize a logical volume, you would ...


1

I did some poking around the internet and noticed that some other people ran into weird issues with bootcamp when they updated to Yosemite. What's important to remember is that Bootcamp is not really supported by Apple. We constantly run into problems related to poorly written drivers. What you are looking at is a driver error. The storage driver is not ...


1

From the scalability section of the Wikipedia article on NTFS: Because partition tables on master boot record (MBR) disks only support partition sizes up to 2 TB, dynamic or GPT volumes must be used to create NTFS volumes over 2 TB. Booting from a GPT volume to a Windows environment requires a system with UEFI and 64-bit support. If you ...


2

This has been answered in detail here. This answer in particular details how to increase the swap partition size. The only reason you would need more swap space is if you hibernate your PC. It will run smoothly with 4 GB RAM and 2 GB swap space.


0

Resizing the boot partition with an external editor (for example GParted) doesn't appear to work for non-NT versions of Windows. Booting will cause an unspecified error on my ancient Windows 98SE virtual machine.


1

If you looked in the status column in the area above the portion of the Disk Management window you cropped, you likely would see them identified as a recovery partition and EFI System partition. Regarding the EFI System Partition, the EFI System Partition Wikipedia article notes: The EFI System partition (ESP) is a partition on a data storage device ...


0

I would like to advice to use a usb formattor software on windows from the same vendor which the usb belongs. If not then use linux to format it completely. Like insert the usb and go to disk management and delete the partition completely and create new partition. I has happened with me many times so What generally do is I use linux (rpm based like ...


1

Those are the default recovery and uefi boot loader partitions for Windows. They were introduced in Windows 7. You can't remove them, sorry to say. However, you don't have to display them as a drive letter, if you just don't want to see them.


1

I solved it! Apparently, the windows built-in partitioner sucks at what it was designed to do. I would recommend if you are stumbling onto this question to use AOMEI Partition Assistant or EaseUS Partition Master, never use the windows paritioner.


1

I realize that this is a Windows question and that there are advantages and disadvantages in partitioning but it is worth looking at how Linux distributions evolved. A few years back almost all of them partitioned heavily between various components (temporary area, a few system ones, user data). I see that this is getting rare now, the main ones just have ...


0

Writing here rather than commenting because not sufficient reputation. In windows 7, you can hide System reserved in my computer( don't know about the other) by using diskpart, and it's 100% working. Please let me know if you want to try it, I am not sure whether it works on win8.1


1

It's defragmentation, and there's no way round it. When an HFS+ drive is nearly full, it has to constantly move blocks around to keep contiguous free space. Defragmentation tools are available, but I doubt they'll help much. You should consider 90% usage as effectively full on an HFS+ volume.


0

i know its an old forum. Mirror is grayed out because the volumes are using GPT and not MBR system. But then MBR doesnt work on anything bigger than 2TB. Personally for a basic file server, Software Raid will do ok for you using Windows server diskmgmt.msc. If you want more space in this case, you should have used 3 x 2TB disks and use Raid-5 using ...


2

Partitioning a 250GB SSD in half. I fill 1st partition with OS and data and leave the 2nd one absolutly empty. Does this affect wear leveling in ssd? If you create two partitions and just not use the second one: No. The data for the first partition will be stored whereever the SSD controller decides it want to store it. That can (and will) use all of ...


0

Yes that is, odd. Anyway it is not recommended to partition a hard drive for Linux in Windows. Debian may have Gparted pre loaded to a live disk during a GUI install, if not boot into a copy of GParted or Ubuntu and open the program. Select your Windows %systemDrive% and resize it, The program has a nice slider and + and - buttons to make it perfectly even. ...


0

That's wired. The disk management should support the situation. I test it, it is OK. Or you try EaseUS Partition Free.


0

When I install Ubuntu and other similar linux distros, it allows me to shrink the Windows partition during the install. The Debian resources show a similar functionality as well. To losslessly resize an existing FAT or NTFS partition from within debian-installer, go to the partitioning step, select the option for manual partitioning, select the ...


0

An alternative solution would be to use TestDisk to do a deeper scan and then press P to get access to the files list inside your disc, which also allows to recursively copy all the files. This is what I did in a similar case as yours, and it worked greatly (because I had not access to a 512B USB adapter...).


0

Try GParted. It will allow you to make changes to anything you want. Be very careful! You need to prepare all of the partitions before you install your OSs. Write down what your partition's names are and where they are (including the ones on your hard drive) so you don't destroy anything you don't intend to. Or you can use UNetbootin if you are looking ...



Top 50 recent answers are included