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(Found the solution myself. Since answering your own questions is encouraged here, I'll just do that instead of removing the question.) Starting with Windows Visa, a full format overwrites everything with zeroes: The format command behavior has changed in Windows Vista. By default in Windows Vista, the format command writes zeros to the whole disk when ...


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The later one is right, that is: Data on C will be overwitten and others e.g. D & E will be untouched/unscathered


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First open cmd.exe and type in "diskpart" At the DISKPART> prompt, type the following commands: DISKPART>list disk DISKPART>select disk X (X is the disk number where you want to create the store partition. Refer to results from “list disk” for exact disk number. Disk must be an SSD) DISKPART>detail disk DISKPART> select Volume Z (Z is ...


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As far as I know, you should not play around with the disk if you want to recover data. Use some recovery tools such as Recuva and recover the data. That is all there is to do.


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Also move your page file to another drive should help. Right Click Computer | Choose Properties Click Advanced System Settings Performance Tab | Click Settings Advanced Settings Tab | Virtual Memory | Click Change Uncheck Automaticaly manage page file Clicking on disk will allow you to set paging file where you want


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Yes, it might be the reason for a slow response on your computer. By default the page file resides on the C: drive and since the free space is less it imposes certain restrictions on the storage location of new files. Hence the computer becomes slow. There is an impending danger of losing your hard disk if you do not keep ample free space. I had a similar ...


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After some research I found TestDisk, and it seems like it might be what you're looking for. I'd encourage you to be very cautious when dealing w/ this kind of stuff, though, as I've had some past experience where trying to repair things can make the situation a lot worse. Best of luck! As for your second question, no. :P


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The main ideas before you dive into some guides if you feel like it to learn more details: What is It's a special type of partition (sometimes OSes simply use one giant swap file). What is for The swap partition is used by an OS to artificially increase the size of the memory. When should I use When you think that the size of your physical ...


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You can create a simple FAT32 partition on that USB drive - size 8 GB (so you can accommodate images bigger than 4 GB) Then mount the source ISO and copy ALL files (admin mode) to the created partition on USB. Then you run bootsect /nt60 z: /force /mbr where z: is your partition on USB drive. Check with "Disk Management" or diskpart.exe that the USB ...


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If your laptop has a CD/DVD drive and you are in the possesion of a Windows DVD, I would suggest this: Disconnect the old HDD from the system. Leaving the SSD connected. This is important as you want to fix the MBR on the SSD and NOT the HDD. Boot from windows DVD, enter the installation. When on the screen where you need to choose language for windows ...


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I think you'll be fine to delete the 100 MB partition on your Hard disk, which holds the K: drive. However, in order to make sure, I would go about it this way: Shut down the PC. Unplug the power cable after it shuts down Open the case, and then unplug your HDD, which holds the K: drive so that only your SSD is connected to the system Reconnect power ...


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Delete all the partitions, then create one partition. The installer will tell you it will create some extra partitions to get all the needed functionality, let it do it. I don't remember exactly but I think you end up with 2 or 3 partitions if you have a BIOS and 4 or 5 if you have a UEFI. You can create your partitions outside of the installer so that you ...


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OK, I found the root cause and thus I found the solution. Root cause was that the hard disk was NOT active. So, I booted from the Windows 7 USB (created from the Installation DVD) and selected repair with command line tools. Then: diskpart select disk 0 select partition 1 active Then, I used bootrec to verify that the disk was actually activated and ...


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If the laptop only provides SATA II with 3Gb/s, the values you see in AS SSD Benchmark are fine. You can't improve this.


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It WILL delete your partitions. The recovery system is a sort of destroy and recreate the disk state, thus wiping other made partitions. This may be useful for some people who don't properly know how to handle partitions (a flawed installation of linux, for instance). I would recommend you use third party cloning tools, such as clonezilla, and create ...


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See http://serverfault.com/questions/31812/silly-question-can-i-juste-remove-a-disk-from-a-live-raid1-array RAID arrays are not meant to be pulled apart. They may survive, but will need to re-sync. Also, a RAID isn't a 'drive' it's a partition.


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Ok, I tried it and it turned out it deletes all the partitions then creates its own.


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You could try backing up your files from a LiveCD linux distro. Such as Ubuntu. http://lifehacker.com/5525534/recover-data-like-a-forensics-expert-using-an-ubuntu-live-cd


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Dual boot is done through chainloading. Grub, in your case, fires up, then passes the booting process to windows. Since you removed grub, windows cannot boot. At this point you will need a windows recovery disk/usb. Choose "Repair Your Computer," go to "Troubleshoot," and then enter a Command Prompt. Type the following command: bootrec.exe /fixmbr


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How to fix this issue with Ubuntu 14.04: Log on Windows Download AOMEI Partition Assistant Create a new partition Convert it to EXT3 Start again the ubuntu installation It works.


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Sorry for the late reply, but unfortunately my SSD proved faulty soon after I bought it and I had to RMA it. A few days ago I got the replacement. The point is that unfortunately my question was based on a misunderstanding: I thought, that if both the SSD and the HD were bootable, then some kind of conflict would occur during boot, and the system wouldn't ...


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What you heard may have been valid for some of the earliest solid-state storage devices, but does not apply to modern SSDs at the end-user level. First, modern flash memory can sustain many more erase/write cycles than earlier technology. Second, the SSD's firmware will perform wear-leveling across all the drive's flash memory, including the drive's spare ...


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Using "Disk Management", unallocated space can be extended to an existing partition. Or, look for some third party tools that can easily move the unallocated space to an existing partition. Try GPartEd.


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Don't worry about it. That's like worrying whether using your car will reduce its life before driving to the store to get a soda. Who cares? The reason you have things is so that you can use them. Altering your behavior because of microscopic affects on product life is just not worth it.


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Short answer: you can't shrink the max size, you can only increase it. You can, however, create a VDI with the size you want and clone the old VDI into the new VDI. There are some gotchas, so read on. Cloning the old VDI into the new VDI works only if you can guarantee the following things: You have enough space on the host physical hard drive to ...


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This is normal. The logo is stored inside the UEFI firmware and it used during UEFI boot. On my Dell I can get rid of it by enabling the Option Load VGA Option ROM in the UEFI settings. This disables the GOP of UEFI.


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Hey there you must format any drive > 2GB with FAT32 otherwise it wont work !! If you format a drive bigger than 2GB the clustersize will be >32kb. This toggles your filesystem unbootable! see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File_Allocation_Table


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This error can be result of various things. It could be a hardware failure of some sort - the HDD could have died or the USB connector might be damaged, it could be a bad cable as well, as well as insufficient power going to the drive. But it could also indicate a damaged partition. I see you have tried some partition recovery software, so why not check the ...


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Either the HDD itself or the module attached on the HDD with the USB port is dead. Since opening the case will void your warranty, reclaim the garantee should be the best way to go.


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Problem solved. thanks. I used a boot tool from Acronis and problem solved. the main problem was error "Setup was unable to use the existing partition because it does not contain the required free space." when I wanted to select partition to install windows 7. that problem solved by deleting system partition (I think it's a small partition for boot data, ...


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I wouldn't suggest using diskpart if the hard drive already has some data on it, especially if you've installed the system on it. This is because if you don't know how to use it, then it's better to avoid using it to prevent you from data loss. You can use a third part tool to do that instead, which will give you the same results. Use EaseUS Partition ...


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You could try using Disk Management this will allow resizing partitions and creating new ones with great ease. Create a NTFS partition if you want to be able to boot Windows from it.


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Well, a more knowledgeable answer will be appreciated - however, at least I found how to avoid this problem, while writing the OP. Btw this is TestDisk 6.11, Data Recovery Utility, April 2009 on Ubuntu 11.04. After the disk is blank, re-start the sudo testdisk and follow the trace in the OP to get to the same screen (the one you get after you: hit l for L: ...


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Since these OS run on different partitions, there is no issue when it comes for dual-booting with two OS with different architecture standards. The only possible issue is when you are trying to install a x64 OS on a 32-Bit computer. Thiss WILL lead to issues. < sidenote > Why do you need to install a x86 version of the OS? Is this for debugging? If so, ...


-1

I think all people that answered your questions, gave a wonderful suggestions and shared opinions. So, a long with what they mentioned, I'll drop this post. As far as I know, you can't make .PPT read-only as long as the file is a powerpoint file it'll be editable, but you can do it if you change the file type. If you save a copy of it as .wmv this will save ...


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I want a partition for storing temporary files (such as pagefile.sys on Windows, or linux swap partition), and I want this partition be faster than others. That isn't really the right way to think about the pagefile (or swapfile). These files are used by the OS for infrequently-accessed stuff. You shouldn't be hitting your pagefile often enough for ...


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I ran into the same problem with an Intel NUC. Following the instructions above didn't work for me, either. What did work was to let the boot process attempt to boot from the empty hard drive, fail, and then go through the process of trying to boot from the network, failing, and then have the NUC asking me to insert bootable media. I simply hit RETURN, and ...


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You can fix this within diskpart like this: list volume select volume # extend filesystem "#" stands of course for the affected volmue seen in the volume list.


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Enable CD drive mode in USB stick firmware Quick answer: Scroll down. Long answer: Is partitioning the pen drive, and then making 1 partition as read only, a solution to this? If yes, then please guide me how to do that. There seems to be a lot of talk (and confusion) out there about having read-only partitions on usb sticks, the idea being to make ...


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As others have already mentioned, there is really no way to stop someone whom is determined from modifying a file per se. You can only do the equivalent of suggesting that they don't do it. Thumb drives are about the least secure of all removable media though because they don't even have a system for making the drive physically read only (such as the read ...


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As I experienced: In Windows, if you have too many partitions in the same HDD that the OS is installed on, then this will slow down your system, because of some OS functions that work on the background like indexing and the paging file systems, Which cannot be disabled completely as of these functions are built within the system cycle. So, if you want to ...


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Too many partitions should not slow the computer down (other than the very minor variance in disk access times noted above), but you don't need the partitions for the reason you stated, so there's no harm in using a single partition instead. Folders are just logical ideas in modern disk file systems like NTFS (they don't 'really' exist - but that's a whole ...


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There are many partition managers that will do this for you. I have mostly used the gparted partition editor from an Ubuntu Live CD to shrink/expand/move partitions and found it reliable for Windows partitions. You must of course back up first. If your data are important you will have a running back-up, and if unimportant then you may as well delete D:, ...


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Hard disks can be split into four primary partitions, or one of these can be configured as an extended partition. In terms of any issues, you will have performance issues, given with this example; it should give you some understanding A HDD has the highest transfer rates and the fastest access times on the outer edge. So if you have a HDD with 100GB and ...


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The hda passes the device that will hold the entire disk for the QEMU VM. So when you passed /dev/sda2 it used /dev/sda2 as the entire disk for the VM. So it would seem passing /dev/sda would be a good idea. But I assume your Ubuntu is running on /dev/sda. And directly accessing a disk drive that your system depends on is a bad idea. I would suggest you ...


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well if you know what areas of the hard drive is causing the specific problems you could use a tool called "Hirens BOOT CD" http://www.hirensbootcd.org/ Booting your computer with that software allows you to access your hardrive within its own built in mini XP OS so you can delete the require parts or files if needed. You can also use the tool to recover ...


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Any file/folder containing * in their name will be read-only in Windows. Even admin can't delete or modify it. Remaing space is available for other use. Formting the device will delete it. As * is a invalid charactor for a file name you can't add it to a file name from Windows. In order the rename the file, boot into a linux OS and just rename it. Tested ...


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EDIT: Since you are unable to format it from the Windows installation disk, do it using GParted Live CD.: (Detailed instructions are provided at the GParted Live Manual website). Select an unmounted partition. Choose: Partition → Delete. The application displays the delete partition operation in the Pending Operations pane. Now format it. Choose: ...


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If you just delete that partition, you may have some trouble as you will also remove the grub bootloader config (if you are using grub) which could cause the computer not to boot. But if you are uninstalling everything then reinstalling all at once it wont really be a problem. Best order for me would be Windows, debian (don't install bootloader) then Mint ...



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