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Start over with Bootcamp... This is from wiping the HDD instead of partitioning within BootCamp; which leaves no way to communicate with Apple's server. OS X install is electronic. Windows includes the option to turn off "secure boot"; ARM and Apple do not. OS X requires BootCamp and a small Apple partition, similar to Windows Boot Loader. I have BootCamp ...


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It depends on your recovery script pre-configured at Lenovo factory. And I think it will destroy your partitions because you have changed the disk layout on your own. An external backup would be nice before doing anything.


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I met the same issue with two different USB keys on both Windows 7 and XP. I can confirm minya's bit of information. I thought it'll work with a partition type 'HIDDEN' for the first partition, but nope: even then only the "hidden" partition is shown and usable under both Windows versions (DISK management tool shows all partitions but does not read the ...


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Not "under Windows 7", no - you can't move a partition while running an OS booted from that partition. Use gparted, a FOSS tool. Download the ISO, burn it to CD, boot from the CD. You can find detailed instructions for using it all over the web, but it's pretty obvious.


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An extended partition is a container for logical partitions. Without this kind of partition, you would be limited to 4 partitions per hard drive, The extended partition 0 contains partition 5, for example.


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Partition 0 basically reserves disk space for a limited number of sub-partitions. In what you are showing Partition 5 is contained totally within Partition 0. Thus you cannot delete partition 0 without FIRST deleting Partition 5. This means that the error message is entirely correct.


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.CDR and .ISO files are not the same thing. You can convert your .CDR file to an .ISO file by using Terminal in Mac OS X. Let's use a file named BOOTCAMP.cdr for my example. Follow these steps: 1. Move BOOTCAMP.cdr file (created by Disk Utility) to the desktop of your Mac. 2. Start Terminal. 3. Type: cd ~/desktop then press Enter. 4. Type: hdiutil ...


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You can also try removing your disk and booting. I would tinker with everything uefi related and try a bios update.


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No, Windows does not log partition details for activities performed in the Disk Management MMC snap-in or by the DISKPART command. To my recollection there are events logged in the System Event Log when a volume is created and deleted (with the ntfs and userpnp sources) but these events make no mention of the sectors involved. Lacking the necessary layout ...


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Method I Follow this steps: Connect your new drive as an external driver, with a SATA cable to USB (usually 3.0, but you can do that with two usb 2.0 ports also, like this one.) Clone your drive to the new drive with a tool like Disk Copy, but there are also other free tools you can try out. After cloning is completed, remove the old drive and insert the ...


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Windows does not natively support volumes after the first partition on removable media. For Windows to recognize the "missing" space, any additional partitions must be removed. A simple way to fix this is to erase the partition table on the SD card so that it can be reinitialized. The correct size of the SD card as displayed by Windows should be about ...


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If you can read the data on the card, the simplest way to "clean up" the existing problems and grow the partition to fill the card will be to back up all files on the card, create a new partition table (using fdisk or a higher level partition editor), then create new partition(s) using all available space, format to your chosen file system(s), and copy the ...


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As it seems your bios may not support USB flash drives. I recommend you to use PLoP: Boot From a USB Drive Even if your BIOS Won’t Let You You’ve always got a trusty bootable USB flash drive with you to solve computer problems, but what if a PC’s BIOS won’t let you boot from USB? We’ll show you how to make a CD or floppy disk that will let you boot ...


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Try the below steps to get into BIOS and restore default settings, Perform a Power Drain Remove the battery and Power cable Press the power button for 5+ seconds to drain the leftout power Now insert Battery, turn on the laptop and try hitting F1 to enter BIOS Once access BIOS restore default settings and check whether the system successfully boot up ...


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Try rewriting the Partition table. You can use fidsk tool, or gparted. I recommend gparted, as many partition tables are supported there.


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I was not able to use any tool to simply extend my C: partition as I had two recovery partitions in between my unused space and my C:. I had to first move the two partitions that were in between my C: and unused space to the right-most edge of the unused partitions and then I was able to extend my C:. I used the free version of EASEUS Partition Manager ...


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When I need to migrate a HDD to SSD. I use the Samsung Data Migration Software. It's a great tool for moving all your partitions.


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The volume will be defragged before the resizes happens. Although, even if the volume was for some reason was not defragged the only real issue would be the Read/write head would have to travel more to get access some of the sectors. decreasing your sequential reads.


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No. Any tool that resizes partitions will deal correctly with fragmented files.


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There are a lot of strange things will happens If you try to do so Don't try To do that or do it if you have unimportant data or files that you don't care about If you insist you can use MHDD program at hiern's boot 15.2 CD/DVD , this program used to discover where is your bad sectors exactly , then you can use fdisk command to isolate or make a partition ...


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If this is modern drive it has some reserved sectors, where bad sectors are redirected once they appear. If You see "bad" sectors probably reserved area is already exhausted (can't guarantee it - never use HHDs with damaged sectors - too much risk). On Linux badblocks command can help to mark these sectors on the filesystem (on ext2, maybe ext3 ant ext4). ...


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This is a terrible idea. Don't do it. Bad blocks means the drive is dying quickly. Get your data out now. If you have bad blocks near the start of the drive, you're probably screwed as that's where partition tables must live, etc. If you seriously want to do this, perhaps due to masochism, then you first need to figure out where you have a large section of ...


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The best option would be to use a cloning software to clone the one drive over to the other (Something like norton ghost or Clonezilla would do it). After the cloning operation is done you can expand the partition to fit the entire size of the disk using computer management -> then disk management tools in the control panel. AFAIK you can't use a windows ...


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I use often for Servers which run over a few years and go now out of space this workaround: Normally one or two applikations/services/deamons/whats so ever... need the most most space. If thats the case u can mount move the directory from disk sda to disk sdb, so you utilize more space. here is what i do: create a directory on the empty drive mkdir ...


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You have 2.49 MB of available space i.e. 2.49 MB Free space. You need more than 2 GB of available space to install centOS.


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Attention! Overwriting the wrong disk will lead to a data loss! You can connect it to a linux pc, or boot linux from DVD or thumbdrive. Then you find out, where to find the sd card: sudo fdisk -l Let's say, it's /dev/sdc, you will find it easy as it should be the only device with 2GB in size. Now we just overwrite the first 50 MB with zeros. sudo dd ...


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If Windows does not allow you to extend the first partition (not sure it can do that on-the-fly with FAT partitions), you should erase all the partitions on the SD card (meaning that you will lose all the data on it, so copy it somewhere else before), then create a new empty partition taking the whole space on the card. This should solve your problem. Also, ...


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By looking at the screenshot - correct me if I'm mistaken: /dev/sda is marked as a SYSTEM, but does not have a "boot" flag set. /dev/sda2/ has a boot flag set but doesn't seem to be manjaro booter. In other words, you tried to utilise a hard drive while breaking up the partitioning. It seems Windows tries to boots from /dev/sda but it cannot find its ...


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Remove the hard drive before booting into the SSD for the first time The problem you experienced is caused by the Windows installation on the SSD continuing to reference the old hard drive. As a result, Windows incorrectly assigns a drive letter that is not C: to the SSD. Because the system assumes that key system files are in C:, several core components ...


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Usually small percentage of the partitions available space is used to store file system-related data but it wont be shown if you try to view with show the hidden files.This is for applied for all partitions.I have also had small partitions with 100 mb labelled as primary with the same used space so i have format it and added with another disk make sure ...


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Overprovisioning is just unreserved space. This according to Samsung who I have contacted on 2 separate occasions. Their Samsung Magician software contains an overprovisioning feature. I am informed that this software issues no vendor unique/specific commands to the drive. Here is my answer to setting up overprovisioning with a dual-boot system: ...


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Paragraph 2 - install overtop of Ubuntu partition should work. Don't need to remove the partition, but erasing files or reformatting couldn't hurt, I don't know if every distro will erase old files or try to use some. May need to repair your windows bootloader if it's gone after deleting Ubuntu & decide not to install another linux. -> After reading ...


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You're most likely not going to get anything back, since you deleted the partitions and installed windows, you've most likely written over the space containing those previous partitions. The more you mess with a drive with deleted partitions, the higher the chances of getting rid of that data forever. You can always try of course with Testdisk, Recuva or ...


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That's not how partitions work. What happens if you're copying from a Linux ext3 partition to a Windows-based NTFS? You can't just change the index, you need to physically move the data. This is also why partitions do not dynamically expand by default. Data is laid out, ideally, in a single stream for each file, within the bounds of the partition. Just like ...


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You can't just copy iso file to usb, you need to create bootable flash drive. Also, you can create live DVD of your Ubuntu and partition the drive or download one from Ubuntu home page.


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The only things you need to do are steps 1 and 4 to create a new filesystem using the remaining space. HOWEVER: Windows can't read LVM partitions: it's a format that Windows doesn't understand. You can use Linux to create an NTFS filesystem on it if you want but Windows will never be able to see it. What you actually need to do is resize the physical ...


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Do not delete that D: LENOVO partition. It is used for the complete image recovery (as in factory reset). Yes, there is another partition labeled PBR_DRV but you need this D: LENOVO as well or else you will get the dreaded Windows cannot find a system image on this computer error message when attempting recovery.


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I mainly do data recovery from physically failing drives, but the tools are the same and about twice a year I get a client who has accidentally fornatted a drive with important data and I need to recover all that wasn't overwritten. From experience, I can state: -- Yes, there is software that can help you and others in similar predicaments. -- Your data in ...


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Download gparted from http://gparted.org/ boot into it. use it to resize the partition.


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I think I found the answer. @Hennes and AIDA64 helped. It seems like Western Digital has come up with a solution to prevent the slow demise of MBR and it's called Advanced Format. With this technology, WD has increased the block size of the HDD from 512 bytes to 4 kilobytes so Advanced Format drives can grow to 16 TB without hitting the 32-bit LBA size ...


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Firstly, Back up all your files and serial keys. Windows included. The easiest way to look for that is to: Restart your laptop Press F11 as soon as the Lenovo Logo appears. If you partition is intact, it will take you to the recovery manager. If not, you can try F8/F7 at startup for Windows Recovery. It should give you an option for the Recovery ...


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Any portion of the disk that has been overwritten, by any method will not be recoverable. The portion that has not been overwritten still exists. Changing partition tables still does not delete the data on the sectors. Quick Formatting does not delete the data. Full formatting in win7 does zero out all the data. Different simple hard disk recovery softwares ...


-1

Go to disk management. Right click your desired partition, click extend - use default settings and it will fill up the space.


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@Neurobear, this is a bit off topic but highly relevant if you bought a SSD that needs trim support such as the Samsung 840 Evo or any other Samsung drive for that matter. Hope it's helpful to you or some other reader. Personally I've had to buy a new drive after deciding on Yosemite given my penchant for security and a preference for headaches free SSDs. ...


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There's no such thing as "undiscoverable", but you can make it so that reasonable searches won't find it. For instance, you can partition the hard drive (hiding items on it from completely new users), and then make the partition invisible (hiding it from any casual search). It's a common practice for PC manufacturers to put the restore software on a ...


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If the 65GB Free space is in an extended partition, that means the 50GB unallocated is not in any partition at all, so you should be able to expand the 65GB Free/Extended partition all the way to the left, overtaking the 50GB unallocated. That should work with gparted but I'm not too sure about windows. But they are both empty space you want to re-use, so ...


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Although it seems like it may not be relevant in this case, there is another reason that you can't extend a partition into unallocated space. If the partition you want to extend is a logical drive inside an extended partition, then the Disk Management GUI isn't clever enough to expand that extended partition automatically into the unallocated space, so it ...


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So I eventually solved it like this: Open windows command prompt with administrator privileges Type diskpart and press enter list disk and then select disk 0 (or relevant number) to select the disk list volume and then select volume 2 (or relevant number) to select the volume Then simply extend and this extended the D drive to fill the available space to ...


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I'm using Partition Find and Mount and it found my partition intact (all file names and directory structure are ok). I just mounted it and backing up the partition. Maybe it helps you. I also want to know a alternative way to fix the partition, without backing up and recreating the partition



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