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So those two drives will appear again if you remove the USB? That's weird. If you are worrying about the data on USB, just back it up.


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In Disk Management, the only way to make the unallocated space adjacent to your C drive is to delete D:drive, which I don't think you would like that. therefore, I suggest you use free disk partition software AOMEI Partition Assistant. You can either use the Merge Partition feature to directly add the unallocated space to C drive, or use Move Partition ...


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There were a couple of factors to the problems that were preventing the VM loading but thanks to SimonS for helping point me in the right direction to a suitable work-around. Firstly, creating the VM as a Generation 2 proved problematic because the hard-drive could only be attached to a SCSI adapter but this was unable to boot hence why I was getting the ...


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If Windows Disc Manager is to be believed, all the partitions apart from C: and D: are empty, though I'm not sure I believe it. If you run the Ubuntu Live CD, you can use gparted or disks to mount each of the partitions to check their contents with nautilus (but you will need to use gparted later for partition management). Ubuntu supports a lot more file ...


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Convert the disk to a dynamic disk and it will let you extend it into the space a the end of the disk. Just right click on Disk 0 and choose Convert to Dynamic disk. It will popup lots of warnings about not being able to boot other partitions/oses and so on. As you have the simplest of setups here you can OK them and convert. You should then be able to ...


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Apparently there is currently no way to properly resize a virtual hard disk, only to expand it. So what I did was basically to repartition the virtual hard drive (from inside the VM) so the VM will use only the space I allow it to. Then I wiped the reserve space, and ran vdiskmanager as figgycity50 suggested. In steps: Repartition the virtual HD: Download ...


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I fixed it. I just plugged in the USB that I had converted to GPT. I used diskpart to clean it and create a primary partition. This removed the two phantom drives. Anyways, I got a question now. What'd I have to do if I had lost that USB? Just a question I had.


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You cannot do that with windows onboard tools. There are various tools available that would allow you to move the D partition to the end of the free space, thereby freeing space after C, but this is a relatively dangerous operation (if you have a power failure during the move, you could loose the content of D or the whole disk), and not strictly necessary. ...


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Slightly Left field answer: Create an E: drive in the currently unpartitioned space. Transfer your files and folders from D: to E: Delete the D drive freeing up that space. Rename E: to D: Extend the C: partition into the empty space now adjacent to the partition. I'm not sure how effective this solution would be for someone with more data ...


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There may be multiple issues. You mentioned Windows 3.11. As I recall, there can be some issues with Win 3.1 (which I've used) on systems with too much RAM. 256MB is okay. More than that can be iffy. In particular, I seem to recall needing to edit a configuration file, possibly just for installing Internet Explorer. When I was looking for a new system, ...


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This article provides instructions on how to use the vmware-vdiskmanager tool to, among other things, shrink the disk with the -k <diskname> argument. The tool should be included with VMWare Workstation in the C:\Program Files\VMware\VMware Workstation directory provided you have not changed the install directory. Therefore, you could open your ...


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This SD card is defective or damaged or the electrical pins are bad. Try again after cleaning them. If it still fails, then it is time for a new SD card.


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Use bootrec /rebuildBCD in a recovery environment to find your other windows OSes and fix the bootloader. Make sure it finds both your Windows 7 and 10 installs. Source


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Obviously I am not UEFI Not really. If your UEFI firmware has decided to boot the OS in BIOS-compatibility (CSM) mode, it'll also look like BIOS. It would be more reliable to look through the firmware's settings screen or documentation. Also, when you try to boot from a CD or USB through the firmware's "boot menu", look carefully – often there will be ...


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Ubuntu will primarily try to format its OS under an ext4 partition. This is not supported in windows and therefore you cannot access them. There are a varity of 3rd Party tools availalbe such as Mini Tool which will aid you in completing this task in Windows. Personally I would find the easiest option is to use a Live Linux USB in order to format the ...


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Is the 260 Healthy (EFI System Partition) my Linux grub thing and do I need to remove that partition No. Don't remove that partition. Windows also puts its bootloader there (see UEFI, especially here if you want the in-depth details). UEFI is designed to allow OSes to put multiple bootloaders on the system without directly clashing with each other, and ...


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I was unable to format a 32GB USB stick using tools from either Ubuntu, win8 disk manager or diskpart, after my son formatted it for a Linux Anaconda boot device. Fix was to use diskpart-list disk-select disk-delete partition override and finally CLEAN. This removed underlying attributes and I was able to create a new primary partition and format as NTFS ...


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When you say "Is it just the Seagate drive or is it the Mac/Win data?" I am assuming you mean "is it the entire contents of the drive or just the Mac/Win data?" In which case it would depend on how you have the drive setup and the settings you choose on whatever software you're using, but if you reformat the whole drive then you will lose all of the data. ...


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Ask a friend to help you do the following: Download and install rufus (You will need an USB drive) If you want to recover your data, you will need a live CD that you have to create first. I prefer using this one, everything is configured and ready to use. All you have to do is download the iso, and use rufus to make an USB drive bootable with the iso. ...


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The link provided by snayob answer was the solution for me. As a link may go broken, here is the steps: Download, unzip and run Dual-boot Repair tool (handles win XP to windows 10). On target disk, if you do not have a boot partition, create one with disk management (launch-able from dual boot repair tool). 50mb should be enough, format it as NTFS, map it ...


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It might be that the PackageKit cache is filling up. PackageKit is used by GNOME to handle updates. If you use Yum or DNF on the CLI then don't need these. You can remove the .rpm files in /var/cache/PackageKit/metadata/updates/packages and set PackageKit to not store them any longer. There is a setting in the file /etc/PackageKit/PackageKit.conf # Keep ...


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Is my disk locked in a permanent way? You need to add the override option. override Enables DiskPart to delete any partition regardless of type. Normally, DiskPart enables you to delete only known data partitions. Source DiskPart Command-Line Options How to delete an OEM partition "Cannot delete a protected partition without the force ...


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Boot off a copy of the gparted liveusb image; it can do everything the native windows DISKPART cannot. https://sourceforge.net/projects/gparted/files/gparted-live-stable/


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I used Diskpart to delete the recovery partitions which allowed me to extend the partition into the unallocated spaces.


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I managed to install the chrome recovery to USB on osx. This fixed the partition


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Just writing an answer to summarize what helped the OP in the end (from the comments section). Though you should be able to get into bios from tapping the F2 key repeatedly, this did not work for OP. The solution therefore is to reset the bios to default settings so that you can access it again. To do this: 1) Unplug AC power and take out the battery. 2) ...


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The correct key should be F2, try pressing it right from power on with your laptop or external keyboard. You may also get idea from this official source


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So yes. It all worked out. I moved all my 4 hard disk partitions to larger hard disk using primarily just gparted and dd. I connected the 2 HDDs to a PC Mobo w. 2 SATA wires. Booted Lubuntu 14.04 (or any Linux/newer could work) on USB. I opened GParted, created new larger partitions on the new larger HDD, that corresponds/similar layout to my smaller HDD ...


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Apparently it's because parted only shrunk your partition but not the ext4 filesystem on it. Unlike gparted, parted no longer does anything with the filesystem layer. So you need to shrunk the ext4 with resize2fs first. made a new one in its space If you only created a partition (but not formatted it with any mkfs.* yet), you can probably delete the ...


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It is unknown because you have entered an undefined partition type GUID. What you have entered: C12A7328-F81F-11D2-BA4B-00A0C93EC930 While the correct type GUID for EFI System partition is: C12A7328-F81F-11D2-BA4B-00A0C93EC93B (0 vs B at the end) In any case, you should use the following type GUID: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7 ...


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I'm late to the party, but would like to share my input anyway. The Windows Partition Manager does have the ability to shrink partitions. If you right click on "Disk 0 > OS (C:)", it should give you a Shrink Volume option, but it's not perfect. Even after uninstalling programs and moving data to get down to 50GB, You will probably have trouble going from ...


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TLDR version: I successfully used Ubuntu LiveCD and gparted to shrink my main Windows 7 partition. The rest is just detailing it out for beginners/what I would've liked to know prior to my adventure....And that I did all the risky work on spare hardware, so my data was not in danger. I was trying to shrink a 500GB hard drive with 100GB of data to the point ...


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TLDR version: I successfully used Ubuntu LiveCD and gparted to shrink my main Windows 7 partition. The rest is just detailing it out for beginners/what I would've liked to know prior to my adventure....And that I did all the risky work on spare hardware, so my data was not in danger. I was trying to shrink a 500GB hard drive with 100GB of data to the point ...


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I think you need to extend the filesystem. list the volumes DISKPART> list volume select the volume which does not show all the space available DISKPART> select volume [x] DISKPART> extend filesystem This is based on information from the post below regarding virtual machines but it may help: ...


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You can still partition your SSD after an install is finished. You can do this through Disk Management which is natively built into Windows.. In Windows 10, you can right click on your Desktop and select Disk Management. Once in Disk Management, you'll right click on your drive and select Shrink Volume. You can then choose how much you want to shrink it. ...


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This, is, quite bluntly what happens when you have no idea what you're doing. That 100 mb partition is where the bootloader is. A reasonable guess is that its trying to fastboot and failing since it can't find the bootloader. Try holding down or tapping escape (for getting to the system setup) or F10 while you're turning it on. Tapping is the correct ...


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Thank you @Roh-mish for all your help. I finally figured this out, and as I haven't seen the answer anywhere else online I'll share in case this happens to someone else. After getting stuck on the black screen with the "an OD wasn't found" error, I went back in to BIOS after restarting, and navigated to Storage > Boot Order. Here, under the Legacy settings > ...


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You have to delete the partition to remove the mbr partition table. Once you delete the partition, you will have 465.8 GB unallocated space. Now you can either create new partitions or install windows on entire disk.


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Read what the error is telling you. It is trying to use EFI and your disk has MBR. Delete the disk completely (you currently have 0.0 MB of free space) and setup from there.


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It looks like the mystery partition is in fact an OEM partition from HP, which was previously hidden but for some reason assigned a drive letter. To get rid of the drive in my computer open the disk management console from start menu, right click on the partition and there is an option to configure the drive letter. Open that and there is an option to remove ...


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Your disk seems to be formatted MBR and the flash drive with the ISO is in GPT format. I have had this issue before. You can use Rufus or similar software to convert the flash drive to MBR boot disk or using a Linux live image reformat the entire disk and set it to GPT.


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According to Kingston Technology Support Kingston has some of the drive allocated to a hidden area. Most likely a certain chip with cells. Not accessible by the user. A hardware hack would allow you to possibly see what is truly being held there. The Hidden area could hold. Reserve cells for longer life of the drive and the firmware as controller ...


1

Are you sure you have setup the Bios to operate as UEFI only ? (Without legacy/CSM support.) I've seen a couple of Bios variants that wouldn't accept GPT disks for UEFI boot if the legacy support was also on. The logic seems to be based on the incorrect assumption that if you have legacy enabled your OS isn't UEFI capable and therefore also is MBR boot ...


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1.Back up all volumes on the disk you want to convert from dynamic to basic. 2.Open a command prompt and type diskpart. 3.At the DISKPART prompt, type list disk. Make note of the disk number you want to convert to basic. 4.At the DISKPART prompt, type select disk <disknumber>. 5.At the DISKPART prompt, type detail disk ...


1

You can move partitions in order to align the unallocated space with the partitions you want to expand. See this answer for advice pertaining to a similar question. The GParted Manual (Contents in the gparted Help menu) explains how to move a partition in the Advanced Partition Actions section, within Working with Partitions. You can choose the Resize/Move ...


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You can follow this step: -Buy a usb or cd. -Download rufus or win32 disk imager for ready your usb from ISO. -Ready your USB. -Put the usb in the pc. -Join in the bios and boot menu. -Select the usb or pc and press enter. -Install Ubuntu with graphic installer and select "ubuntu with windows" -Restart the pc.


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What we see from diskpart output: Disk 0 is GPT style (disk 1 seems to be USB? in MBR style) System BCD is always on EFI System partition (partition 1 on disk 0 in your case) You can map partition 1 after selecting it using assign. Exit diskpart. Then on command prompt you can run then chkdsk. There is also a very easy solutions for mapping EFI ...


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It will be fine. Ubuntu installer is smart enough to know where your files are and avoid these sectors. I would recommend you to defrag your HDD before installing Ubuntu to minimize the risk. Honestly, Ubuntu doesn't need that much space. In my school when we install Ubuntu alongside Windows XP we usually give Ubuntu about 40GB (half of the available disk ...


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If your previous OS installation was linux then your partitions will be formatted to ext3 or ext4 - these formats are not recognised by windows.



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