New answers tagged

1

Windows partitioning tools (currently?) don't support resizing extended partitions (identified by the green box around your logical partition "H:"). To extend an extended partition (without destroying data in the logical partitions within it) you'll need to use a 3rd party partitioning utility, like (for example) a GPartEd Live CD/USB.


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I think the better way is not to divide HDD, and make one NTFS partition because you have also a /home partition. This way you will can use whole HDD in both systems. I have also one more partition on SDD for data which I want to have fast acces. I have also dual-boot with Windows 10 and Linux mint 17.3 and it works good. I have never had any problems. //...


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Windows 10 takes up basically the same amount of space as Windows 7. I assume your installation was taking up close to 100gb not because of Windows but because of software you installed overtime. Unless you specify for every piece of software you install to be elsewhere, it's going to be on your C: drive. Personally, I never make my C: drive less than 100gb. ...


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Looks good to me, It is definitely doable. Personally, as a bit of advice, I wouldn't recommend dual booting. Its always been kind of buggy and I hear it is especially so with Windows 10. The issue is that the Windows Boot Loader and GRUB(the Linux boot loader) don't work well together. To overcome this I Install linux on a separate drive and then swap ...


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So from the discussion in the comments I gather these are your goals: Add 240 GiB to sda2, the Windows partition Add 90 GiB to sda6, the Linux partition Currently, the disk is in an illegal (sort-of) state, though most operating systems will tolerate it: The extended partition is followed by another partition both physically (obvious from image) and ...


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The basic problem is the extended partition /dev/sda3. There are several things you can do:- You should be able to extend /dev/sda3 to fill the currently unallocated space: you will probably need to do this by booting a LiveCD. You can then move the swap partition /dev/sda5 to the end of the extended partition (though it will be quicker to delete and ...


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In the efi partition, there is the efi boot loader in the directory /EFI/boot, and on a x64 system the file bootx64.efi is loaded, on a x86 system the file bootia32.efi is started. No sector addresses or similar are needed, because the EFI understands the file system (FAT32). Windows stores its boot configuration in the directory /Microsoft/Boot/, namely in ...


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For posterity's sake, I solved this issue by reinstalling Windows 10 after reformatting. This was not preferred but I was unable to find an alternative. If anyone has a possible solution to this problem that does not include loss of data, please answer and I'll set your answer as correct.


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GO to run and type following command: msconfig It will show the System Configuration Windows: select the tab named Boot. In that you will find 2 OS listed in boot manager. one is your current OS and the other one is the your last installed Os's entry. select your last installed OS entry and delete it. Press OK button and restart the system. your problem ...


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Yes, I agree with Saurav Wahid. Primary volume size cannot be extended and that’s why the extended volume option is not highlighted.


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Simply copy all the important files from the HDD onto your SSD temporarily, then format the drive or delete the partition. Then, just copy the files back onto the fresh partition on the HDD.


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You can use the BCDEdit application to alter what shows up in the boot list. But, I presume you've already physically removed the partition 2? https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc709667(v=ws.10).aspx


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in drive partition contain with two volume 1. Primary Volume 2. logical volume Primary Volume Partition size cannot be extend which not contain in primary volume. your drive in Deep Blue border Primary volumes. and rest other in Green Frame which are Logical Volumes. so you cannot be extend C: drive from Logical Volumes partition size. You can extend ...


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From your screencap, I can see that your D drive you deleted was a logical partition - that is, a partition within a partition. The dark green frame represents the actual physical partition. Still from your screencaps, there are 3 other logical drives in it (E, F and G). Before you can delete the Extended Partition (the physical partition that contains them ...


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The space that you freed is inside extended partition which is special type of partition - it can hold logical partitions. By default disk manager won't let you resize extended partition which contains other volumes. It needs to be empty, then it can be resized. That is the reason why windows won't let you expand your C volume. You can use external tool, ...


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Microsoft came up with DISM that solves this issue entirely... DISM doesn't care about partition size but, obviously, you must ensure the backed up data will fit onto the smaller disk - i.e. Don't knowingly try to put 500GB worth of C: onto a new 250GB disk. DISM is available through the WAIK (Windows Automated Installation Kit) kit and you can create ...


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@RockPaperLizard, as far as i know, you can not only make a image smaller than the source partition, but also restore to a partition smaller than source partition. For example, if your Windows 7 system partition is 100 GB with only 30 GB used, you can make a image of the used space use "intelligent sector backup" without any compression of image. Then image ...


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Clonezilla works best when it is cloning from one disk to another disk of exactly the same size. I've had mixed results with cloning partitions. If you want to clone to a device that has less storage space than the original, you can try PING (Partimage is not Ghost). This has worked well for me in creating compressed images of my hard drive. I've upgraded ...


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You don't need a backup device as large as the whole drive for most modern backup software - and in many cases it can be slightly smaller due to compression. I tend to use third party software (Veem endpoint backup handles my daily backups, and I've used macrium for one off backups). So, if you want to play it safe try backing up first, then doing windows ...


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It's possible that it's a diagnostic utility of some sort that the manufacturer put on the hard drive as a convenience. Another possibility is that it is used as an addition to the system restore partition for extras such as drivers or junkware that the manufacturer wants to have pre-installed when you restore the OS. Since it's an unknown partition, you ...


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2GB seems pretty small for a recovery partition. We're talking about Windows here, which comes on a 4GB DVD (or two). 10GB is a more likely size for a recovery partition, especially if it contains pre-installed apps (or crapwear) from the manufacturer. Best guess is that the 2GB partition may be some sort of stripped-down recovery OS, and the 10GB partition ...


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A byte-for-byte clone as you put it is quite inefficient and Clonezilla by default will not attempt to do such a thing. Instead it will attempt to copy just the files and data that was listed as being used on the hard drive to the backup medium to keep the backup small. The only reason to reduce the size of the partition before starting the clone/backup ...


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Open Windows Explorer Right-click on Computer then Manage Open Disk Management From that window: To completely remove a partition: Right-click the partition Click Delete (may be greyed out if system-critical) To remove an alias: Right-click the partition Click Modify volume letter and paths Change at will More options from right-click menu (...


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You can format the full drive or a partition. If you have bad sectors, and you want to format the whole drive, you cannot do that if there's an operating system on it from within that OS. You'll have to boot from another media and format the drive, then reinstall the OS. But fist of all, get HD Tune and run a full scan to see if you indeed have unreadable ...


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The plan would work, but it's partially obsolete. No idea about the 10GB partition, but if possible simply back up the whole disc just to be sure. Besides that, Windows 10 may be uninstalled within 30 days, allowing you to go back to the previous state without having to rely on your own backup.


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Versions of Intel RST before version 9.6 are known to have problems with HDDs with 4K sectors. You should just uninstall Intel Rapid Storage Technology to see if that resolves your problem. Intel® Rapid Storage Technology (Intel® RST) version 9.6 and newer supports 4k sector disks if the device supports 512 byte emulation (512e). Intel RST does not ...


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I thought it was same... That's not quite right. The size of the partition is determined by the partition table in the MBR. And the size of the file system is determined by the Partition Boot Sector. They are different. But the size of the fs should not exceed the size of the partition. Then I would like to know how I could get the final sector of the ...


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When you shrink a partition, you are left with some unallocated space. Create a new partition with this and then transfer all the data into it. this is a workaround, because some HDDs can be buggy when trying to do stuff with partitions.


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To maximize contiguous free space on a hard drive or thumbdrive, I've found this method quick and sure: Naturally, backup the system; irresponsible not to recommend this Download and run MiniTool Partition Wizard (free) Launch MiniTool, select the partition you'd like optimized Select Move/Resize Uncheck ""Using Enhanced Data Protecting Mode" Size-down to ...


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I did it using Partition Wizard


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There is no need to actually have the 2TB. (Note: I only know the windows commands, you need to find the respective commands for your OS) Defrag the VB (run DEFRAG /D C: inside it) use SDELETE inside the VB (and this will not increase the physical file size - VB is clever enough to realize that a block of all zero is just that) Use VBmanage outside the Vb ...


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It looks like you have a UEFI based install First, enter your computer's SETUP (typically by pressing delete or F2 while the computer is booting). Within setup you usually have the option to rearrange or remove boot options. Once the boot option for grub has been removed, you can delete Grub's files from the EFI system partition, (you can assign it a drive ...


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#!/bin/sh hdd="/dev/hda /dev/hdb /dev/hdc" for i in $hdd;do echo "n p 1 w "|fdisk $i;mkfs.ext3 "$i1";done You can use this script. Just make sure you define your own partitions where hdd is defined. There are 2 blank spaces between 1 and w; they need to be there for taking default values.


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I agree with dtfrank, this method works (I didn't try any other methods). My laptop is encrypted with McAfee End point encryption 7, and this is the process I used: Ensure the new HDD is same size or bigger than the old one (my old one HDD was 320GB, new was 500GB SSD). Use HDD Raw copy on another PC ([http://hddguru.com/software/HDD-Raw-Copy-Tool/][1]) ...


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How to do it using gparted. first back-up your data, then shrink /dev/sdb6 to the right. move /dev/sdb5 to the right. (Now pay attention to what @curtis said) if you will next extend /dev/sdb3 into the space then shrink /dev/sdb4 (the extended partition) to the right. extend /dev/sdb3 into space. click apply else if you will next add a new partition ...


2

Shrinking an empty ext4 filesystem is indeed very fast, but you're also moving the beginning of the partition. Now, instead of relocating the end and chopping it off, every single bit in the large partition must be shifted in the direction you moved the partition. The partition is very large, so it'll take a long time. You should probably recreate the ...


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If you convert the hard drive from GPT to MBR Windows 10 won't boot anymore. Since your receiving the error "The selected partition is of GPT" then you must of booted the Windows 7 installer using MBR by accident. Most BIOS' will let you push a button to select the boot device at startup (e.g. F12). Make sure you select the EFI DVD or USB option. How ...


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"Windows recovery environment (loader)" is the correct option to start your Windows 10 bootup. There is a way to change it to "Windows 10 Startup" or whatever name, but you do not need to do it. If your Windows 10 worked OK before installing Linux Mint, then it should work properly after picking that option after your dual-boot install.


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I managed to reclaim that 100GB by a four step process Mounted a new Disk (/dev/sdc) with same size as incompletely used disk (/dev/sda4) and used pvcreate and lvextend to add it as a logical volume to the LVM volume group I used pvmove to move the data from /dev/sda4 . This took ~16 hrs but was seamless. It automagically moved it to new /dev/sdc volume ...


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There should be no problem with just cloning the smaller partition on the larger drive and then enlarging it.


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NTFS allocates a hidden data-structure for it's meta-data. For a 500 GB partition this will be around 350 MB when the NTFS format is done with default settings. So this is completely normal. This is just the way NTFS was designed. The only way to get rid of it is to re-format with another filesystem.


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Take a look at easy2boot It requires windows for building the initial image(s), but supports almost any bootable image file. You simply add iso images to the usb drive and select which image you want during the boot process. It also supports live cd type images with persistent storage (i.e. winPE based gandalf). You can also add arbitrary installers, files,...


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Windows is requiring a GPT partition because your BIOS is configured in UEFI mode not in legacy 'MBR' mode. For future reference, if you can at all avoid it, you want to install windows before installing Linux. The reason is that windows will wipe out your GRUB configuration; there is no installation option that I am aware of where Windows won't at least ...


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Why not just merge the a bunch of free space in the front directly into system C drive with "Merge Partitions" feature of AOMEI Partition Assistant?


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Boot into GParted Live, or any Linux CD that has GParted in it. It can both move and reliably resize NTFS partitions. (Best to avoid swapping them, though.) Use GParted to move the "reserved" partition to the beginning of the disk (the program will probably insist on leaving the first 1–2 MB free); then move the C:\ partition next to it; and finally use ...


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I'm sure someone has a better answer, but I have also run into this problem before. After several frustrating days troubleshooting, I backed up everything I needed on my Windows and Mac machines, and then reinstalled OS X from the Web using recovery mode. From there, I set my hard drive to desired partitions and installed Windows. It was the least painful of ...


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The GPT disk format can simply contain more data than its predecessors. One of these fields is the partition name, which, as you have found, can be set by gdisk or similar. However, before GPT, there were formats which didn't support labels in the partition table (e.g. MBR), so the data was stored in the fs as a filesystem label. Using GPT with a filesystem ...


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First, you will need VMware's VDiskManager utility. If you do not already have it installed, you can download it here, scroll down to the "Attachments" section (has links for Windows, Mac, and Linux). You will also need OpenSSL if you haven't installed it already (Windows download link). If the VMDK is not already in "Monolithic Flat" form, you'll have to ...


-1

In disk manager, right click on C: then shrink drive! Select how much you want to shrink by (455-120?) then shrink. You should have 300~ GB unallocated space which you can then partition into :) Edit: Cool guide from HowToGeek


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In a nutshell, all three tasks can be done on the same USB stick. You can simply install the Ubuntu OS on the USB stick, that should take care of all three tasks for you. I personally think using a Live CD on a USB stick is better for what you're looking for. In order to do that, the first thing you'll need is a program called YUMI. This will allow you ...



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