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190

My favorite password storage tool is KeePass: What is KeePass? Today you need to remember many passwords. You need a password for the Windows network logon, your e-mail account, your website's FTP password, online passwords (like website member account), etc. etc. etc. The list is endless. Also, you should use different passwords for each account. ...


65

There appear to be several easy to use Excel password crackers around. I would use a password management system like 1password or LastPass which work on several OSs including mobiles. These have plugins for most browsers which can fill in passwords and other information to the web form. 1password can also set up a bookmark in the browser which will ...


60

Honestly, there is none. Not unless they offer an API where you can do remote management on your accounts. Pick and choose. Which ones are the highest priority. Bank for example you should change. Forums and other media sites could be ranked lower and changed on a need basis. PS: I also think people are blowing this heartbleed way out of proportion.


47

I have used Lastpass for a while now and recommend it highly. It has some wonderful browser plugins and a bunch of features that make it easier to have more secure passwords. The browser plugin will automatically fill-in login information (when logged into the plugin). It also has an export functionality, so you can retrieve your database and import it ...


23

You can create a copy of a password entry: And then only use references for username and password in the new entry: Then, adjust the URL in the new entry.


21

The following post sums it up best from the luxsci.com blog When Master Passwords are in use, the data is encrypted using 3DES in CBC mode by default. If you choose a good, strong master password, then this level of encryption should be fine. 3DES is rated to be good for general use through 2020. You should be aware that there are ...


14

If you are already using a password manager, you could combine that with a cloud service like dropbox, or mesh. Just make sure that you can save the profile of your password manager inside a folder that is synced by the cloud service and all your other connected computers will get the updates!


13

On my personal computers I will allow my web browser to remember my passwords, but that is because they are mine and nobody else will ever touch them (unless they break into my house and steal all my stuff, and then I have bigger things to worry about). For public computers or work computers I would definitely choose neither, especially if you are working ...


13

I would suggest you use key-based authentication. Then you can use an agent to store your passphrase. For PuTTY, take a look at pageant.


12

No. If you forget this master password, all your other passwords in the database are lost, too. There isn't any backdoor or a key which can open all databases. There is no way of recovering your passwords.


12

I have a very simple way of dealing with passwords: I don't like password managers, but I like crypto, so I take advantage of one-way hashes (md5, sha1, etc) and generate passwords using them. How it works? First, I choose a good long password that I will use everywhere. For example qwerty (don’t use that, just an example). Now for every site, your ...


11

Regarding the ability to use 'key files' with KeePass. In order to generate the 256-bit key for the block ciphers, the Secure Hash Algorithm SHA-256 is used. This algorithm compresses the user key provided by the user (consisting of password and/or key file) to a fixed-size key of 256 bits. This transformation is one-way, i.e. it is computationally ...


11

I've been a long time KeePass user, and if I were tasked with justification, I'd probably do the following: Skim the sites FAQ for all of their details about security. Everything I've seen there will practically sell itself. Show the longevity and support for the project, indicating it isn't going to be dropped by the wayside anytime soon. Show off a few ...


11

I'm curious what kind of answer you expect to get... A piece of software that cascades password changes over various protocols, sites, procedures, etc.? I'll bite my tongue on my opinion of the cost/benefit of actually changing all those passwords, considering any one of them could be cracked in a reasonable time frame, regardless if they are compromised. ...


10

Since your question probably doesn't lend itself to an easy answer, I would propose that you change the passwords of websites based on how vulnerable they make you (loss of money, loss of privacy, loss of reputation, etc.)


10

Lastpass is another good alternative.


9

You can't, it's by design. See Putty wish remember-passwords


9

Password Hasher plugin (for Firefox) is what I personally use. How Password Hasher helps: Automatically generates strong passwords. One master key produces different passwords at many sites. Quickly upgrade passwords by "bumping" the site tag. Upgrade a master key without updating all sites at once. Supports different length passwords. ...


9

Keychain Access has this capability built-in, and it comes with Mac OS X.


9

Chrome has an extension to work around the sites that code auto complete off.


8

I personally use PasswordMaker to generate passwords from a master password and the site's URL. The project is fairly mature, open-source and stable. It is available for Firefox (as an extension), Linux CLI, Android etc. How it works: Warning - technical jargon in this section! You provide PasswordMaker two pieces of information: a "master password" ...


8

Sounds like you are trying to manage client passwords without going crazy. What you are looking for is a password manager. You have a few options LastPass KeePass RoboForm PassPack A home-brewed solution. Like keeping the accounts in some document But remember, since these are your clients passwords and account information, security should be a priority ...


8

I work voluntarily on various IT related projects, where we are groups of people that share passwords, and the different groups all share their own KeePass databases via Dropbox. All users are then required to have a personal KeePass database wherein the key to the shared databases are stored. This allows us to have a very secure password on our shared ...


8

Try: Edit → Preferences → Security → Passwords/Exceptions and remove the site from the list in the dialog box. Also make sure that "Remember passwords for sites" is marked.


8

Yep. Run control userpasswords2 from the command line. Uncheck the box for "Users must enter a user name and password to use this computer". When you click "Apply", you'll be asked for the username/password combo you want to use to login. This user will then get logged in automatically.


7

The passwords are encrypted and stored in a SQLite database: The important piece here is CryptProtectData, which is a Windows API function for encrypting data. Data encrypted with this function is pretty solid. It can only be decrypted on the same machine and by the same user that encrypted it in the first place.


7

Keepass seems to be the best available password manager. Info: What is KeePass? Today you need to remember many passwords. You need a password for the Windows network logon, your e-mail account, your homepage's FTP password, online passwords (like website member account), etc. etc. etc. The list is endless. Also, you should use ...


7

I usually just create different database files and share them with a Dropbox link. Having two different files with two different random keys. I'm using version 2.09. I have a "personal.kdbx" database that has all my personal stuff and a "company-name.kdbx". I usually use the "key file" option to open the databases since it's easier to the people I share ...



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