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37

IDE (Integrated Drive Electronics) was the original name, then they standardized on ATA (Advanced Technology Attachment) as being a broader standard that included additions like CD-ROMs and such. When SATA ( Serial ATA ) came out, people started using PATA (Parallel ATA) to refer to the older parallel connected bus (those using ribbon cable), to be more ...


30

The size of an internal-bay device is given by two figures: the "size", or form factor (usually 2.5", 3.5" or 5.25", but occasionally other values), and the height. Wikipedia has a list of hard disk drive form factors. According to that table a 3.5" HDD is 146 mm long by 101.6 mm wide, or just under 5 3/4 inches by exactly 4 inches, and may be either 19 or ...


29

Serial ATA is the connection/connector interface, ATA-8 is the protocol on that interface. IDE was the interface and it also used an ATA protocol for communications. IDE and ATA are not the same things, just as SATA and ATA are not the same. To be clear, IDE defined that a drive should have Integrated Device Electronics (I.e. a controller) onboard and ...


23

AHCI vs IDE – Benchmark & Advantage Excerpt: Advantage of AHCI Hot-Plugging Native Command Queuing (might improve computer/system/hard disk responsiveness, espcially in multi-tasking environment ... Verdict: These extensive benchmarks clearly show to us, AHCI (NCQ) definitely could improve computer system responsiveness, ...


22

I ended up Frankensteining two computers together. I put a PCI PATA card in the new machine for the data connection and got power from a different computer. Ugly.


20

According to Microsoft KB 922976, run Fix it 50470 or open regedit, navigate to one of these keys: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\msahci HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\IastorV and set the value of the Start dword to 0. Reboot and enable AHCI in BIOS, now it should work. Remember to create a restore point ...


18

Although it is IDE, the edge connector you can see at the top of the drive isn't, it is probably an adapter to a specific computer (or other device). I suspect its something like this: http://www.amazon.com/Original-Foxconn-Dell-Drive-Connector/dp/B000MMFPQU If you wiggle it a bit it will probably come free and show the usual IDE double row of pins ...


17

You can see AHCI as the language which the controller uses to speak with the system. The disk can't see if AHCI is being used or IDE emulation. If you use AHCI, all Serial ATA features are available, while you don't need any drivers specific to your controller. To actually use AHCI, the OS (whether that's Windows, Linux or even Ghost) has to have an AHCI ...


15

Judging by the product code MK3021GAS: Interface Type: DMA/ATA-100 (Ultra) a.k.a IDE


14

The important part here is really that desktop hard drives used a 40 pin connector with a 4 pin molex power supply connector. Laptops used 44 pins - which includes power. A laptop PATA -> USB adaptor typically is self powered, or powered by a Y shaped USB connector with 2 USB A connectors for power A desktop PATA -> USB adaptor typically has its own power ...


12

The easiest thing to do would be to buy a external enclosure, and use that to power/access the drives. Newegg's selection


12

I found an interesting article here that explains the difference. It appears that it was actually called ATA, but IDE and PATA were just different names used by different branding. It just goes to show how much competition (and money) there is amongst computer related companies to have their particular brand of the current technology accepted as the ...


12

Integrated Drive Electronics was the original marketing name to differentiate from when the electronics were on a separate board (ST-506 and ESDI). But for example, SCSI drives also have their controllers integrated. So the standard was named "AT Attachment" for the IBM PC/AT (which in turn meant Advanced Technology, but ATA is not Advanced Technology ...


11

Pin 1 on a ribbon cable (the cable itself, not the terminators) is usually colored differently than the other pins - often red.


10

tl;dr: What does this setting [SATA controller mode = IDE] mean? In this BIOS setting, "IDE" means separate disks attached to the main disk controller will each be shown as one separate disk to the operating system (for example as C: and D:). will bad things happen if I change it? Bad things will happen if you change controller mode from IDE to ...


9

PATA IDE supports 2 drives per channel max. So even if you have the extra drop you can't use it. This cable would probably work with only two drives attached though, unless there's something (else) weird about this cable. :) The cable you linked to just happens to be a 40-pin ribbon cable with 4 drops, and these people have mistakenly labeled it as an "IDE"...


9

Here in 2012, per this performance comparison, it doesn't seem to be urgent for a single user workstation. However, AHCI is a better and more modern option and you should always use it when you can. From that article: If your application requires hot-plug drive support or redundant disks, then AHCI is the only choice. IDE mode can occasionally ...


8

In it's most basic form (and there are a lot more factors than this one) this is happening because in the PATA system all of the lines must have the data show up at the same time for the data to be readable. If you switch to serial you can increase the frequency by a factor much higher than the highest stable frequency you can get in a PATA system * the ...


7

Yes, many types of converters can be very flakey. The cheap ones can almost guarantee problems eventually. Make sure you have a clean solid connection with the drive connected. If you are using the USB ones, that is a shared bus on the computer. USB can be quick one day and slow the next depending on what’s going on. I find for short transfers, those ...


7

This is a bit complicated because the ATA-3 spec was only a draft, never a final specification. Thus it's hard to say what version of the draft your system claims conformance with. The latest ATA-3 spec states a maximum PIO speed of 16.6MBps, and a maximum DMA speed of 33MBps. That's the bus speeds, you also have to consider the CompactFlash card's speed, ...


6

Your BIOS should have a boot menu. From there you can toggle boot order across a myriad of devices (IDE, SATA, USB, removable media, etc). Just make sure the drive you WANT to boot from is higher in priority to the wonky IDE drive.


6

My experience: I administer a small compute rcenter with 30 computers, each with two hard drives and two dvd-rom drives. The HDDs are SATA and they use the converters. It's been 2 years now and not a single drive has failed and neither have the PSUs. They are safe because they are designed to draw more or less the same amount of power as IDE drives.


6

The IDE connector is the same on 3.5" and 5.25" IDE hard disks, so as long as your USB adapter includes means to power the drive (it should, as 3.5" drives also require power separate from the IDE connector) it can be used to read both sizes. The 2.5" connector is different, and includes a power connection to run the smaller laptop type drives.


6

Your IDE/PATA cable pinout looks like this : The pins following " pin 1 " row are uneven (1, 3, 5, 7, and so on...) The pins on the bottom row are the oposite (2, 4, 6, 8, and so on...) (Note : pin 20 is blocked from the cable) The ribbon cable pinout of the connector is simple. If you count from the red wire to the last gray wire, it goes normal : 1, ...


5

As Rodeey said, there isn't much a difference feature-wise. The advantage of SATA is the thinner cable, so it is easier to route the cable in a cramped case. The cable can also be longer than IDE cables, so you can move the DVD drive to the upper drive bay of a big tower case.


5

In both cases there will definitely be performance gains to see from either. Hard drive performance is a function of a few things, such as: Drive bus type (IDE ATA66/100/133, SATA150/300/60, SCSI, FC, etc. Affects the upper bound maximum speed, and burst speed from the drive's cache) Drive rotational speed (Affects sequential read and write speeds and seek ...


5

You can tell by looking in your OS' device list. If the device is attached to an IDE channel, it's not running in AHCI mode. Enhanced/SATA allows you to map SATA devices to IDE, so operating systems without AHCI support can still make use of the disks. SATA+PATA usually means that SATA is mapped to primary IDE, while PATA is mapped to secondary IDE (in ...


5

For some reason, no one has mentioned the obvious differences between IDE and RAID (AHCI). IDE is a software EMULATION mode that allows operating systems that don't natively support AHCI (Advanced Host Controller Interface) and SATA to still be able to detect and use your drives as if they were connected to an IDE controller. This, of course, means that you ...


5

Its using an oldschool atapi connector rather than sata, and as I recall the core 2 era lenovos use SATA for the hard drive and a backward compatible atapi connector for the cd rom drives. ATAPI is pretty much pata so I suspect the drive caddy downconverts the SATA connection to PATA, which explains the slower speed. From your paste, its also running at an ...


5

I have seen old IDE drives misbehave with jumper settings that should work. Cycle through all the possible settings on each of the drives: master/slave, master/CS, Slave/CS. Some drives have a master setting which is Master ONLY (no other drives allowed) and another jumper with master w/slave.



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