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27

After quite a bit of search i found this paragraph in a document called PCI Express™ Card Electromechanical Specification Revision 1.1 : As shown in Figure 5-1, a ridge feature is defined on the top of the connector housing on one side. This feature can be used to facilitate card retention. A retention clip may be mounted on 15 an add-in card and latched ...


10

Yes, a PCIe x4 card will function in a PCIe x16 slot. The slot will simply use 4 of the 16 lanes available, and the card will work properly. See Wikipedia for more details.


9

Yes. The x16 slot is physically bigger than the x4 card and has 4 PCIe lanes available, so the x4 card will fit, and run at full speed.


8

Without powering up the system, you can most likely tell from visual inspection which slot is x8 and which is x4. Each PCIe pair of traces (differential pair) has two series capacitors (AC coupling capacitors). The capacitors will be lined up on the top and/or bottom in pairs parallel to the long edge of the slot starting closest to the interior of the ...


8

Some games can use a dedicated card for PhysX simulation. Other than that, I can't come up with anything that the second card could be used for (in terms of enhancing performance). The difference between x1, x2, x4, x8 and x16 PCIe is the maximum throughput of the bus (how much data can pass between the card and the rest of the system in a given time). ...


7

PCI/PCI-Express (aka PCI-E) slots let you install expansion cards. Expansion cards give your computer additional capabilities. Some very common expansion cards were sound cards, 56k modems, and Ethernet adapters. You don't have to populate your PCI/PCI-E slots, but it is an option if you need to extend your hardware. Since the introduction of the PC in ...


7

It depends on if the PCIe SATA adapter uses the 1x or 4x bandwidth capability. PCIe 2.0 specification defines a 1x slot bandwidth as 500 MB/s, which is much higher then SATA-II. If you were to purchase a card like this one, for example, it has a data transfer rate of 4.69 Gbps. Since SATA uses 8b/10b encoding, that translates to a raw maximum speed of 469 ...


7

Edit after your motherboard picture: The two small black slots are PCIe x1 slots and this will only accomodate a PCIex1 card. The large slot with a tab on the back is PCIe x 16. It can accomodate PCIe x1, x4, x8 and x16. You can put a lower PCIe x# card into a the same or larger size PCIe slot, just not the other way around. If the "small part" of the slot ...


6

The original serial had 3, 5 or even 7 pins, but only one to carry the data. The three pins serial worked like this: The extra pin for a common ground is needed so that the other computer knows what to compare the data signal with. The receive and transmit lines are crossed, so that data transmitted by computer 1 is received on the receive pin in ...


6

I found a solution to my situational problem since I am required to have the 670 as a secondary card so it can be passed through, I was able to find a setting in my BIOS under "System Agent Configuration" (or something like that) to set a "Main Display" which allowed me to select between "IGPU", "PCIE" and "PCI" up till now I had thought "PCI" stood for ...


6

Wireless N maximum possible data rate is 600 Mbps. That's 75 MB/sec. PCI data rate is at least 133 MB/sec. So, PCI bus is most probably not your bottleneck. Regarding the wireless range, chipset and antenna play a major role, not the connection/bus technology. So a better card with an external antenna connector, with a better antenna, will have a longer ...


6

The manual identified by Daniel Beck suggests four dual-width graphics cards can be mounted as shown The HD 7970 is dual width but uses a sngle slot Putting a HD 7970 in the bottom slot looks a bit tight to me, with those other connectors under part of the HD7970. The case also needs to be able to accommodate a dual-width card in that position. It ...


6

No, this is not possible. I have never seen a product for that purpose and I am not sure how they could do it. Pci-e slots(not even the full size 16x versions, let alone a 1x) are not backwards compatible with pci. Edit: People are finding solutions for this. I do however agree they are not that cheap, add complexity (drivers, overhead, etc), and some of ...


6

Yes. PCIe is backwards-compatible, so you can use 1.0 cards in 2.0 motherboards and 2.0 cards in 1.0 motherboards. As to reaching the full potential of your graphics card, it's true that PCIe 1.0 is half the speed of PCIe 2.0. (So a PCIe 1.0 x16 interface is comparable to PCIe 2.0 x8.) But single graphics cards really don't saturate the bus anyway: if you ...


6

This depends on a lot of factors. Let's make some assumptions. Your video card consumes 10W under idle conditions (monitor turned off due to power save). Your video card consumes 35W under low-load conditions (using business productivity apps or web browsing without video). Your video card consumes 100W under high-load conditions (3D video games, high res ...


6

If you want to know the actual savings, get a Kill-A-Watt. Run the computer for one month with the video card and one month without. Compare the actual kilowatt-hours used and multiply that by your electricity rate for cost comparison.


6

Easiest thing you can do is restart the machine and write down the model number then Google it and look up the specification. Simple, but works!


5

Yes, they will physically fit into the machine (and work properly). You're just not using those extra bus lanes. I also verified this through a discussion on the web: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/205984-33-card-slot


5

Well after a little digging around (which I guess i should have done first) the truth of the matter is, yes, there actually are. There are little cards that you can slip into the PCI-e x1 slot to convert it to a PCI slot. Why would anyone want to do this you ask? well, many companies still make products intended for PCI slots, not PCI-e. It was the graphics ...


5

From ASUS's site: http://www.asus.com/Graphics_Cards/NVIDIA_Series/ENGT430DI1GD3LP/ Unscrew your "large" metal plate (2 sets of 2 hex screws around DVI and VGA ports, pliers will do, and one phillips screw above the HDMI port). Screw in the 2 small metal plates that should've come with the card ( ...


5

If you need to ask... Well practically on a modern system especially as a server of some sort, you can get by without any at all - You can go with onboard video (avoiding the use of a PCI-E slot for video card), ethernet (so you don't need a expansion slot for it either) and so on. Most modern boards are practically self contained. As far as a home server ...


5

Shameless rip off of Chris S's excellent answer to a similar question over at Server Fault regarding the PCI-e spec: What should be: The PCIe spec states that all slots start at 1x and neotiate how many lanes they can use. It shouldn't matter who has more, some slots are designed to take larger cards and smaller cards fit in larger slots. Whatever ...


5

What you want is a riser card like this. The problem is that almost all standard cases won't accept the the add in cards, especially if they have external interfaces, unless they were designed with them in mind. Such cases are typically 2U rack mountable. Also, with this particular card, there may be other clearance issues since the cards point back ...


5

No, i believe you can use PCI in PCI-X (but not vice versa) since PCI-X is a extension to the PCI protocol. The only slot that a PCI-X card will work with is a PCI X slot PCI-E is a whole different distinct protocol despite the name and is electrically and physically incompatible - the card definitely won't fit by design, and almost everything is different ...


5

This has been done; many years ago you could buy ISA cards (pre-PCI) with RAM on, which presented to your PC as either "extended" or "expanded" memory. This was a way to get past the 1MB limit of the original PC. Modern PCs have a section of extra RAM attached to the video card, separate from main memory. The reason why you don't get RAM expansion cards ...


5

What is the max bandwidth that a PCIe 8x can handle before saturation? The max bandwidth of a single PCIe v3 lane is 985 MB/sec. (8.0 Gbit/second). x8 means that up to 8 PCIe lanes can be used, which give a theoretical max of 64 Gbit/sec. This is less then two 40Gbit links. So you can not run both links at full speed. It might be enough in practise ...


4

Doing a little dimensional analysis Converting 7880 Mbytes per second to Gbits per second we get 63.04 Gbits/sec (63.04 gigabits per second)/(40 (gigabits per second)) = 1.576 If you have a layout like this: Unit (1) PCIe 3.0 slot, x8 or larger -> one QSFP card providing 1 x 40 Gbps connected to 8 lanes Unit (2) PCIe 3.0 slot, x8 or larger -> one QSFP ...


4

dmidecode should display the information regarding the slots on your system. The command needs to be run as root.


4

Does this mean, that I can't use more than one PCIe 16x video card as long as there's only one CPU mounted on the board? Yes. Note that you can also only use half the the memory banks. This is because part of the PCIe lanes and part of the memory banks are routed to a specific CPU. If that CPU is not present then you can not use it. (This is because ...



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