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63

No. Chances are very slim that your laptop has a 10 gigabit ethernet adaptor - its uncommon on high end desktops. You'd also need some clever hardware to translate between PCI-e to ethernet, and the latency, oh the latency. You have a device which is typically put as close to the processor as possible with 16 dedicated pci-e lanes right into it, and you'd ...


47

Many devices use more than 1 lane. For example - gaming graphics cards use 16 lanes. Some powerful gaming computers have two graphics cards - thats 32 PCIe lanes (two x16 ports). Intel i7-5820K can't handle two x16 graphics cards. For some gaming enthusiats or some engineers that may be a serious problem. They may have to choose diffrent CPU (maybe some ...


27

After quite a bit of search i found this paragraph in a document called PCI Express™ Card Electromechanical Specification Revision 1.1 : As shown in Figure 5-1, a ridge feature is defined on the top of the connector housing on one side. This feature can be used to facilitate card retention. A retention clip may be mounted on 15 an add-in card and latched ...


16

Connecting a GPU by Ethernet is like connecting your PS3 controller to the PS/2 keyboard port: sounds like it's trying to fix a problem but the solution turns out to be completely outlandish and impractical. (Granted, if you can pull it off, you'll gain more popularity as that one crazy guy.) That said, I advise you not to try to do this because the ...


15

Yes, a PCIe x4 card will function in a PCIe x16 slot. The slot will simply use 4 of the 16 lanes available, and the card will work properly. See Wikipedia for more details.


15

It is "power over eSATA", or perhaps "eSATA with power". It's an eSATA port but with additional pins that supply power to the drive - which fixes an issue with eSATA that made USB 3.0 look a lot more attractive. Also known as eSATA-p and several other variations. It hasn't seen wide adoption. It's been effectively replaced by USB 3.0. Aside: I do have an ...


13

A PCIe 'lane' consists of 2 differential pairs of signals. One differential pair is used for sending and the other is used for receiving, which allows simultaneous bi-directional communication. Each lane is point-to-point. That is, each lane directly attaches a single host to a single device. PCIe switches can, however, be used when a host lane needs to be ...


12

Yes. The x16 slot is physically bigger than the x4 card and has 4 PCIe lanes available, so the x4 card will fit, and run at full speed.


10

It depends on if the PCIe SATA adapter uses the 1x or 4x bandwidth capability. PCIe 2.0 specification defines a 1x slot bandwidth as 500 MB/s, which is much higher then SATA-II. If you were to purchase a card like this one, for example, it has a data transfer rate of 4.69 Gbps. Since SATA uses 8b/10b encoding, that translates to a raw maximum speed of 469 ...


10

Some games can use a dedicated card for PhysX simulation. Other than that, I can't come up with anything that the second card could be used for (in terms of enhancing performance). The difference between x1, x2, x4, x8 and x16 PCIe is the maximum throughput of the bus (how much data can pass between the card and the rest of the system in a given time). ...


9

Probably not at commodity pricing for another few years. The current offerings are all high-end, using 10/40 Gbps connections and Nvidia Tesla cards. Even then, it's not directly usable for gaming or graphics, but more for CUDA processing. e.g. http://www.chelsio.com/gpudirect-rdma/


8

Without powering up the system, you can most likely tell from visual inspection which slot is x8 and which is x4. Each PCIe pair of traces (differential pair) has two series capacitors (AC coupling capacitors). The capacitors will be lined up on the top and/or bottom in pairs parallel to the long edge of the slot starting closest to the interior of the board....


8

PCI/PCI-Express (aka PCI-E) slots let you install expansion cards. Expansion cards give your computer additional capabilities. Some very common expansion cards were sound cards, 56k modems, and Ethernet adapters. You don't have to populate your PCI/PCI-E slots, but it is an option if you need to extend your hardware. Since the introduction of the PC in ...


7

Easiest thing you can do is restart the machine and write down the model number then Google it and look up the specification. Simple, but works!


7

If you want to know the actual savings, get a Kill-A-Watt. Run the computer for one month with the video card and one month without. Compare the actual kilowatt-hours used and multiply that by your electricity rate for cost comparison.


7

The original serial had 3, 5 or even 7 pins, but only one to carry the data. The three pins serial worked like this: The extra pin for a common ground is needed so that the other computer knows what to compare the data signal with. The receive and transmit lines are crossed, so that data transmitted by computer 1 is received on the receive pin in ...


7

This has been done; many years ago you could buy ISA cards (pre-PCI) with RAM on, which presented to your PC as either "extended" or "expanded" memory. This was a way to get past the 1MB limit of the original PC. Modern PCs have a section of extra RAM attached to the video card, separate from main memory. The reason why you don't get RAM expansion cards ...


7

Edit after your motherboard picture: The two small black slots are PCIe x1 slots and this will only accomodate a PCIex1 card. The large slot with a tab on the back is PCIe x 16. It can accomodate PCIe x1, x4, x8 and x16. You can put a lower PCIe x# card into a the same or larger size PCIe slot, just not the other way around. If the "small part" of the slot ...


7

What is the max bandwidth that a PCIe 8x can handle before saturation? The max bandwidth of a single PCIe v3 lane is 985 MB/sec. (8.0 Gbit/second). x8 means that up to 8 PCIe lanes can be used, which give a theoretical max of 64 Gbit/sec. This is less then two 40Gbit links. So you can not run both links at full speed. It might be enough in practise ...


7

I found a solution to my situational problem since I am required to have the 670 as a secondary card so it can be passed through, I was able to find a setting in my BIOS under "System Agent Configuration" (or something like that) to set a "Main Display" which allowed me to select between "IGPU", "PCIE" and "PCI" up till now I had thought "PCI" stood for ...


6

No, this is not possible. I have never seen a product for that purpose and I am not sure how they could do it. Pci-e slots(not even the full size 16x versions, let alone a 1x) are not backwards compatible with pci. Edit: People are finding solutions for this. I do however agree they are not that cheap, add complexity (drivers, overhead, etc), and some of ...


6

Yes. PCIe is backwards-compatible, so you can use 1.0 cards in 2.0 motherboards and 2.0 cards in 1.0 motherboards. As to reaching the full potential of your graphics card, it's true that PCIe 1.0 is half the speed of PCIe 2.0. (So a PCIe 1.0 x16 interface is comparable to PCIe 2.0 x8.) But single graphics cards really don't saturate the bus anyway: if you ...


6

This depends on a lot of factors. Let's make some assumptions. Your video card consumes 10W under idle conditions (monitor turned off due to power save). Your video card consumes 35W under low-load conditions (using business productivity apps or web browsing without video). Your video card consumes 100W under high-load conditions (3D video games, high res ...


6

You're comparing apples and oranges here, kinda. Version Vs. Size "x1" refers to the SIZE of the port on the mainboard. "2.0" refers to the VERSION of PCI Express the card uses to communicate. Based on the age of your system, your computer probably communicates using version 1.0 of PCI Express. Backwards Compatibility PCI Express is backwards ...


6

Yes, PCIe 3.0 is backward-compatible with all prior PCIe implementations. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PCI_Express#PCI_Express_3.0 However, because PCIe 1.0 maxes out at 2.5 gigatransfers per second (GT/s) vs. PCIe 3.0's 8 GT/s, your video card may not perform as well as you would expect when installed in a PCIe 1.0 slot.


6

Wireless N maximum possible data rate is 600 Mbps. That's 75 MB/sec. PCI data rate is at least 133 MB/sec. So, PCI bus is most probably not your bottleneck. Regarding the wireless range, chipset and antenna play a major role, not the connection/bus technology. So a better card with an external antenna connector, with a better antenna, will have a longer ...


6

The manual identified by Daniel Beck suggests four dual-width graphics cards can be mounted as shown The HD 7970 is dual width but uses a sngle slot Putting a HD 7970 in the bottom slot looks a bit tight to me, with those other connectors under part of the HD7970. The case also needs to be able to accommodate a dual-width card in that position. It ...


6

dmidecode should display the information regarding the slots on your system. The command needs to be run as root.


6

There are two ways a motherboard can provide more PCI-e lanes then the chipset provides: Some modern CPU's provide PCI-e lanes of their own. (in addition to the lanes provided by the chipset) There are PCI-e switches which provide extra PCI-e lanes. Think of this as an Y shape. The bottom of the Y can be 16 PCI-e lanes connected to the normal places on the ...



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