Hot answers tagged

9

Yes, as long as the PCI slot is a 2.x or later, PCI 1.0 was 5v while PCI 2.x was 3.3v - which is electrically compatible with PCI-X. Source: Wikipedia PCI-X


8

You might be OK, but it all depends on what actually got fried during the power surge to actually give you a solid answer. Most of the time, whatever breaks just breaks at the time of the power surge and everything that works, continues to work. I would make sure though you have a proper surge protector or battery backup (UPS) from now on and please make ...


8

PCI/PCI-Express (aka PCI-E) slots let you install expansion cards. Expansion cards give your computer additional capabilities. Some very common expansion cards were sound cards, 56k modems, and Ethernet adapters. You don't have to populate your PCI/PCI-E slots, but it is an option if you need to extend your hardware. Since the introduction of the PC in ...


7

There is no one answer fits all. I have had motherboards with the same chipset and integrated graphics, but on one it allowed and the other it did not. Without knowing your motherboard, it is not possible to know - however ask the manufacturer or just try it. In any case, you will most likely need to set it in the BIOS, you may be able to go in there now ...


7

VirtualBox can in fact pass PCI devices through in recent versions, though it takes some special configuration and certain limitations apply. In short, you need the following support on the host to make it even possible: IOMMU hardware support (VT-d from Intel or AMD-Vi) BIOS that has the IOMMU support enabled The guest machine needs Nested Paging enabled ...


7

A 64 bit PCI card will fit in a PCI-X slot (not to be confused with a PCI-e slot). In practice, standard PCI-33 has enough bandwidth to feed a 1 gigabit card, so you're unlikely to notice much difference in performance, even if you put the 32 bit card in a 64 bit slot. Note that the slots and cards are compatible both ways. PCI-X slots are usually seen ...


7

It depends on the SATA version, the PCI slots and on the drives. Lets start with PCI, which comes in several flavours: 32 bit, 33Mhz. 32 bit, 66Mhz. 64 bit, 33Mhz. 64 bit, 66Mhz. The first option (a 32 bit wide PCI bus running at 33MHz and at 3.3v or 5 volt) is the most common. You will find it in most older computers. (In more modern computers you will ...


6

I'm pretty sure that it will not. A similar thing happened to me but both the card and the slot were dead. The rest of the system worked until it was replaced some years later.


6

No, this is not possible. I have never seen a product for that purpose and I am not sure how they could do it. Pci-e slots(not even the full size 16x versions, let alone a 1x) are not backwards compatible with pci. Edit: People are finding solutions for this. I do however agree they are not that cheap, add complexity (drivers, overhead, etc), and some of ...


6

Something like these. The third in the picture is used to fix your PCI slot


6

There is no such thing as a PCI ISA card. There are ISA slots (in an old 8086 that ran DOS) EISA (about the 80386 era) PCI (80486) and PCIe. There are some other architectures (Micro Channel Architecture/MCA) but that one was proprietary and wasn't used as much. A PCI card could be a graphics card, audio card, network card, anything really. It's just a ...


6

Some solutions for different operating systems: Linux: lspci will print information about PCI-cards (also PCIe) Mac OS X: Use "System Profiler": Apple button in the top left corner of the system menu, then "About this Mac", then System Information Windows: There are lots of system information tools around. HWiNFO is a free one. All of these will only ...


6

Wireless N maximum possible data rate is 600 Mbps. That's 75 MB/sec. PCI data rate is at least 133 MB/sec. So, PCI bus is most probably not your bottleneck. Regarding the wireless range, chipset and antenna play a major role, not the connection/bus technology. So a better card with an external antenna connector, with a better antenna, will have a longer ...


6

dmidecode should display the information regarding the slots on your system. The command needs to be run as root.


6

@Zoredache is correct. It's called a POST card and they have an LED display. The display shows the value that is written to port 0x80 (or possibly other ports, not sure if that's a standard). BIOSes write to this port as they progress through their startup sequence. If something causes the sequence to stop, the last written value can reveal why. Some ...


6

The card itself is an 5740 IBM 03N5444 Quad Port 10/100/1000 Base-TX Ethernet PCI-X Ethernet Adapter which IBM states is a PCI-X 1.0a adapter that operates at 3.3 volts. The motherboard itself is an HP P5LP-LE (Leonite) which has only PCI slots. More details from the manual itself here: There are three 32-bit PCI slots on this motherboard. The slots ...


5

Well after a little digging around (which I guess i should have done first) the truth of the matter is, yes, there actually are. There are little cards that you can slip into the PCI-e x1 slot to convert it to a PCI slot. Why would anyone want to do this you ask? well, many companies still make products intended for PCI slots, not PCI-e. It was the graphics ...


5

You want the program setpci. It looks like this format would do what you want: setpci -s 00:02.1 F4.B See man setpci: the only difference with your version is you're trying to set the register, so you name it and assign a value ("F4.B=x"). Here, just name it; don't assign a value. From the manpage: Operations To query value of a configuration ...


5

If you need to ask... Well practically on a modern system especially as a server of some sort, you can get by without any at all - You can go with onboard video (avoiding the use of a PCI-E slot for video card), ethernet (so you don't need a expansion slot for it either) and so on. Most modern boards are practically self contained. As far as a home server ...


5

The short answer is "Yes", if the BIOS (which performs initial enumeration) adheres to PCI specification. According to: "PCI Express System Architecture" R. Budruk, D. Anderson, T. Shanley, ADDISON-WESLEY DEVELOPERĀ“S PRESS, 2003. ISBN: 0-321-15630-7, page 743: The specification states that the enumeration software must perform a depth-first search, so ...


5

To answer the question from the title: Not all PCI cards are the same size. Some are half height. Some are regular (full height). Some PCI card only use a 32 bit slot (mostly in PC desktops), while others use the 64 bit interface. The latter are usually larger, partially due to the larger connector size. This picture gives a nice indication of slot ...


5

You aren't likely to find a PCI to Sata III card because the maximum bandwidth of Sata III isn't supported by PCI (~750MBps vs ~133MBps). Sata III drives should work on Sata II or Sata I buses, so there's probably another reason why your drives aren't being detected that has something to do with software or firmware. Also, have you checked to see that the ...


5

Typical PCI cards have either one or two key notches, depending on their signaling voltage. Cards requiring 3.3 volts have a notch 56.21 mm from the card backplate; those requiring 5 volts have a notch 104.47 mm from the backplate. "Universal cards" accepting either voltage have both key notches. This allows cards to be fitted only into slots with ...


5

I was just wondering why PCIe devices can't share the same lanes. PCIe uses a point-to-point topology, so each lane expects one device on each end. If it wasn't, it'd be something like the original PCI - one issue with plain PCI is that when one device is talking on the bus, others have to wait.


4

According to Wikipedia's PCI article and List of device bandwidths, PCI bus bandwidths can be calculated with the following formula: frequency * bitwidth = bandwidth 33.33 MHz * 32 bits = 1067 Mbit/s = 133.32 MB/s Conventional PCI buses operate with the following bandwidths: PCI 32-bit, 33 MHz: 1067 Mbit/s or 133.33 MB/s PCI 32-bit, 66 MHz: 266 MB/s PCI ...


4

For PCI and PCIe devices, a BAR is a Base Address Register that is used by the BIOS or OS to tell the device what physical addresses to map its memory resources into. Most PCI devices in your system requests a certain amount of memory space, and the BIOS tries to fit them all below 4 GB in order to ensure compatibility with 32-bit operating systems. It ...


4

Do you really mean 3 GB? As in Three Gigabytes? I'm not going to pick on the fact that they are quite likely to die, but I'm more thinking about the likely horrible performance (even building a raid out of them won't help that much) and the low space. What operating system do you run? As RAID0 is suicide, that leaves RAID 1, 5, 6 or 10. RAID5 means you ...


4

Your 3GB drives are excellent... for doorstops and paperweights (but are too small to use as boat anchors). They are well past their service life, and will likely fail very soon. Not only that, they will have horrendous performance compared to modern drives (especially ones which use perpendicular recording). Send them off for recycling. Seriously. I mean ...


4

The part K000099140 number is apparently a Toshiba wlan card. Perhaps they have an old invoicing system and they've ordered you a new wireless card. Might be no more to it than that.


4

Main system RAM has nothing to do with a BAR. The BAR simply configures the device to decode access to those addresses. Normally the device contains a number of configuration registers. The BAR allows the CPU to access these registers as if they were a block of ram, but there isn't actually ram there. The PCIe root complex is configured to route most ...



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