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4

First off its a hard disk not disc. Disc with a "C" is for optical media, like CD-ROMs and DVDs. Now, on to your question as to why a SSDs dont necessarily improve the speed of running applications compared to a traditional HDD. The reason is disk access. SSDs do read and write much faster than traditional hard disks. However, unless the application is ...


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Ask yourself the obvious question: If the processors ran consistently at 2.4Ghz, wouldnt they market them at 2.4Ghz? From Wikipedia: The increased clock rate is limited by the processor's power, current and thermal limits, as well as the number of cores currently in use and the maximum frequency of the active cores. When the workload on the processor ...


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It depends on your particular use of your computer. Different programs stress the hardware in different ways and performance may increase according to the upgrades that best satisfy each program's needs. I see two main ways: Benchmarks Tools/Suites You can search the internet for benchmarks tools/suites (e.g., this one, which I googled just now and have ...


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A. when your system starts to swap, you are already in trouble. You don't won't to get there, ever. B. SSD are faster than conventional hard disks, but they are still significantly slower than RAM memory. A running game in an adequately designed system uses only CPU, GPU, and RAM, and the hard disk is only accessed for saving game status or such. Therefore,...


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Generally swapping only occurs when you start running out of RAM. With today's systems with 16GB and higher, it is unlikely that playing games would cause swapping to occur. If swapping does occur, then yes, it would be much faster when using an SSD than a HDD. However, the page file is often disabled on SSDs to limit the number of writes and thus increase ...


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While it's not listed in the man page of openssl speed, it can still measure aes speed (on my machine at least). Running openssl speed {some random value} will print an error message that includes the list of ciphers it can test. For me (on a debian), this includes aes-128-cbc, aes-192-cbc, aes-256-cbc, aes-128-ige, aes-192-ige and aes-256-ige. If you want ...


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The fact that the 4K random speeds did not increase as much as expected when the queue depth is increased to 32 probably means that NCQ is not in effect. Usually that's because SATA mode is not AHCI but IDE compatibility. In Linux that can be caused by the boot parameter libata.force=noncq. P.S. In my past experience, when my SSD suffered performance ...


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There's no known threshold for that. If WBC enabled all writes will go to flash regardless of their size. The only case they go to disk bypassing flash is when flash is already full and flushing it before acknowledging newer write is pointless: latency will spike all over the roof. Some good reading on topic: https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/...


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Even with many more cores than tasks, they won’t scale perfectly. That’s because some state is almost always shared. Not necessarily in the task, but the kernel, for example. Or they may access the same resource, like the network or a disk or whatever. SMT (ie. Hyper-Threading) may rely on the fact that different tasks use different CPU execution units. As ...


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The clock speed requirement is meaningless. The software doesn't care how the CPU gets its performance, just how well it performs. Minimum clock speed requirements have been obsolete and close to meaningless for about 10 years now. A typical i5 2.4GHz dual core laptop CPU will have a passmark CPU rating of about 4,000. A typical 2.1GHz Core2 dual core ...


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Usually the slow speeds are indicators of a failing drive, so it was a good decision to run chkdsk on it to see what the results will be. However, in order to be sure I'd suggest to run another test but this time instead of the OS tool I will recommend to check in the official manufacturer website if a diagnostic tool is available to use and run a test with ...


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@Rakitić it seems your system is aging, thus, your issue my involves dust, drivers compatibility problems, and might also have some faulty chips. Basically, freezes mostly occurs from of the Followings : RAMs (It might be faulty or needs to be increased or replaced.) Heat (The heat-sink not cooling the processor probably, thus you need to replace the ...


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There are a couple of things I would check - The SMART status of the hard drive. This could tell you if the drive is starting to have issues. If the heatsink is clogged or the fans have stopped working on the drive.


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There will be little to no measurable difference for pure computational tasks, or the differences will be masked by other things such as disk access or other OS features taking precedence. There's a nice set of benchmarks at TuxRadar: Benchmarked: Ubuntu vs Vista vs Windows 7 For the first few graphs the benchmarks are meaningless and a bit pointless, the ...


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If you want to customize the write-back cache size, use the Windows PowerShell cmdlets and the -WriteCacheSize parameter, for example: New-VirtualDisk -StoragePoolFriendlyName "My Storage Pool" -FriendlyName TieredSpace -StorageTiers @($ssd_tier, $hdd_tier) -StorageTierSizes @(50GB, 300GB) -ResiliencySettingName Mirror -WriteCacheSize 2GB Note: After a ...



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