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100

Yes, because the operating system can use the extra RAM as disk cache, which speeds up access to data on disk. Extra RAM won't make CPU-bound computations (not involving much disk I/O) faster, though.


47

Since every operating system manages memory differently, and none was given, I will answer in the context of Windows 7. Below is an example from a computer with 24GB of RAM. Even though only 7 GB is currently allocated as "In Use" memory, another 10 GB is allocated as "Standby" memory and contains data that may or may not be read again. If it is read, it ...


16

If the operating system is only using 4GB out of 8GB, it will run no differently to a machine using 4GB out of 16GB. The ram that is unused has no impact on the performance of the machine. However, the ideal situation is for the OS to use almost all available RAM. The OS and applications will request what they need, and the remaining ram should be used as ...


7

One other part to the equation is how the memory sticks are configured. Specifically, modernish motherboards support dual-channel memory which allows you to double the bandwidth between your motherboard and memory; if you had paired memory and you took out 1 of each pair, you've lost this and so your memory access when doing a lot of memory transfers will ...


5

I noticed you're using an AMD APU. These chips combine a CPU with a built-in graphics processor (GPU), eliminating the need for a discrete graphics card (at least for lighter workloads). Because AMD APUs use the system memory as graphics memory, integrated GPU performance is highly dependent on memory bandwidth. Not only does DDR3 system RAM have ...


3

First of all, the CPU's your machines have are probably a few CPU's combined into one (more physical cores). It is even possible that each physical core has a few logical cores. Second - the usage on your laptop may not be maxed out, but if the program is single threaded then it can only use one, and only one core, not more. This means that if you have four ...


3

You have an APU, rather than a discrete CPU and discrete GPU. That means that they share system RAM for texture cache, rather than dedicated on-board memory on a graphics card. The reason the RAM upgrade sped things up for your game likely is because of texture resource swapping. With more RAM available overall, that means more texture data is able to be ...


2

There would be a difference but that difference is so insignificant that it would not be noticeable to the user or even to a hard drive performance testing program. The reason there would be a difference is because the information sent back and forth from the hard drive needs to travel an additional 10cm there and 10cm back. Even if that additional time ...


2

If the memory is ever maxed out or 99% you are going to lose speed because of the page file which sits on the hard disk. The hard disk can not even come close to the speed of RAM being that RAM is directly accessed by the cpu depending on bus speeds. Windows uses about 3-4 GB idle of ram not counting other applications. I have been running 16 GB for years ...


1

The technically correct answer is "NO" to the question as stated (as the Q. says "(usage) never reaches 8 GB" and mentions "same type of memory"). [Eg database (only) server with 4GB of files and 2GB of process allocated memory doesn’t need more than 8GB] Note: Hibernation slows down on Ubuntu as the memory size increases - on my system with 32GB of memory ...


1

Before you blame your disk drive you should look at the amount of ram you have. In a healthy computer with lot's of ram a significant amount of it will be dedicated to a disk cache (thus preventing re-read's of data). Likewise in a "slow" computer, the disk will be devoted to swapping memory to disk or will need to do significant re-read's of data to load ...


1

Removing half of your 16GB of memory will slow your computer down. This holds even if you never use close to 8GB of memory. The software side of it is covered in other answers and boils down to the OS chosing to use RAM rather than disk. However you might see a hardware driven hit to performance by halving the amount of RAM available. The reason is that ...


1

A length difference of 10cm doesn't matter much, only theoretically. The mechanics of a harddisk affects more. For some insight: You will not find cheap USB cables longer than 5 meters. The longer ones has attached electronics, which is required for reliable operation. This is due to physical facts, causing the length of the cable degenerate the signal ...


1

The CPU's visible in Task Manager are Logical cores, I have a server with 4 Physical processors which equate to 24~ logical cores, each of which is visible on my task manager.


1

Most likely you're using a desktop or a laptop that has a single processor. Also likely is that it is an AMD64 or Intel64 processor with multiple cores. Task Manager generally shows performance across the cores in the system. If you had multiple processors, it generally puts a block around the cores within a particular processor so the user can see the ...



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