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150

This is a velociraptor. As you may notice, it's a 1tb, 2.5 inch drive inside a massive heatsink meant to cool it down. In essence, it's an 'overclocked' 2.5 inch drive. You end up having the worst of all worlds. It's not as fast at random reads/writes as an SSD in many cases, it doesn't match the storage density of a 3.5 inch drive (which goes up to 3-4 tb ...


107

Yes, because the operating system can use the extra RAM as disk cache, which speeds up access to data on disk. Extra RAM won't make CPU-bound computations (not involving much disk I/O) faster, though.


81

No matter how much RAM you have, you want the system to be able to use it efficiently. Having no paging file at all forces the operating system to use RAM inefficiently for two reasons. First, it can't make pages discardable, even if they haven't been either accessed or modified in a very long time, which forces the disk cache to be smaller. Second, it has ...


74

TL;DR answer The performance of any GPU, including those found in AMD APUs, is heavily dependent on memory bandwidth. The memory upgrade caused a dramatic performance increase because the system previously had only one memory module, and the upgrade added a second module which doubled memory bandwidth by enabling dual-channel operation. Detailed ...


69

dd by default uses a very small block size -- 512 bytes (!!). That is, a lot of small reads and writes. It seems that dd, used naively in your first example, was generating a great number of network packets with a very small payload, thus reducing throughput. On the other hand, gzip is smart enough to do I/O with larger buffers. That is, a smaller number ...


65

Not sure these justify picking a hard drive over a NAND-Flash SSD, but they are certainly areas that a 10,000 rpm hard drive would offer benefits over one. Write amplification. Hard drives can directly over-write a sector, but NAND-Flash SSDs cannot overwrite a page. The entire block must be erased, and then the page can be re-used. If there is other ...


54

Since every operating system manages memory differently, and none was given, I will answer in the context of Windows 7. Below is an example from a computer with 24GB of RAM. Even though only 7 GB is currently allocated as "In Use" memory, another 10 GB is allocated as "Standby" memory and contains data that may or may not be read again. If it is read, it ...


21

Tons of bad answers here from people that obviously only know low end SSD. There is one reason - Price. Mostly if you do not need the performance. Once you need the IOPS budget a SSD (even in a Raid 5) gives you - anything else does not matter. 10K SAS/SATA drive: around 350 IOPS. SSD: The ones I use - last years model, etnerprise - 35000 Go figure - ...


19

In office you mostly work with files, so the disk operations are the most common. Moreover Core i5-560M CPU can handle all the operations performed in office and the delay is caused mainly by the disk operations anyway. Summary is faster disk will boost whole system much more than faster CPU.


18

Aside from cost, is there still a reason to choose a 10K RPM (or faster) hard drive over an SSD? Isn't it obvious? Capacity. SSDs simply can't compete on capacity. If you care that much more about performance than capacity and want a single disk solution, an SSD is for you. If you prefer more capacity, you can go with a raid array of HDDs to get ...


16

With equal amounts of memory in both slots, memory can be "interleaved" so that successive chunks of memory alternate slots. That way, memory accesses get distributed to both slots almost perfectly evenly, allowing their bandwidth to combine. With uneven amounts, memory cannot be interleaved and has to be mapped first to one stick and then to the other. A ...


16

If the operating system is only using 4GB out of 8GB, it will run no differently to a machine using 4GB out of 16GB. The ram that is unused has no impact on the performance of the machine. However, the ideal situation is for the OS to use almost all available RAM. The OS and applications will request what they need, and the remaining ram should be used as ...


16

You are entirely correct in your assumption. Memory management algorithms are very complex and by any means not perfect. So swapping occurs even when there is plenty of spare RAM. On some systems, like Linux, you can control swappiness, on others you can't. By swapping out data when there is still plenty of RAM, system in its own way prepares for the ...


13

You have an APU, rather than a discrete CPU and discrete GPU. That means that they share system RAM for the texture cache, rather than dedicated on-board memory on a graphics card. The reason the RAM upgrade sped things up for your game likely is because of texture resource swapping. With more RAM available overall, that means more texture data is able to ...


13

Speaking as a Storage Engineer, we've been deploying flash across the environment. The reasons we aren't doing so faster are: cost. It remains eye wateringly expensive (especially for 'enterprise grade') - may not look like much on a 'per server' basis, but adds up to shockingly large numbers when you're talking multiple petabytes. density. It's related ...


9

Can you safely disable the pagefile? If you run out of free memory, including virtual memory, the system cannot continue to guarantee deterministic execution, and ends itself. Before that happens, the operation system will do various other things such as killing programs that use too much memory. What I want to say is, memory is always finite, and every OS ...


9

When using virtual hard drives, regardless of use with or without a virtual machine, you can improve performance by hosting the virtual hard drive file on it's own physical drive to avoid IO being lost, because the host OS is using it. You can also improve performance by using a pre-allocated space, instead of a dynamically expanding virtual hard drive. ...


8

You're comparing apples to oranges. The time for you to download your one-word web page mostly consists of the time necessary to actually set up the connection: looking up the DNS record for the host, and then making a TCP connection to it, then requesting the document. This is more comparable to the time it takes you to set up an ssh connection: looking ...


8

I don't know that much about how SSH works, but from what I understand it basically takes your keyboard input and pipes it into the shell of a remote console. Pretty light-weight once the connection has been established and keys exchanged. HTTP is a totally different protocol. It works a bit like this, assuming it's a just a static HTML page: Establish ...


7

Is 1GB RAM so little? Psychological Explanation Like with most things computer, it depends on the usage. If I open only one browser tab, and that has a Youtube video in it, the playback will stutter. If I play something in Media Player and open a browser, the playback will stutter. A friend recommended to put more RAM in it, and indeed, Win7 system ...


7

I would pick the SSD system. For Office you don't need a fast i5. Here the i3 is also fine.


7

To reiterate what others have said, moving swap to a straight RAM disk is rather pointless (in the most common case, see below). It achieves that at certain point, when the system is starved for free memory, some data is moved from RAM to RAM in a rather inefficient way. Having swap on HDD/SSD achieves that the OS can clear out some completely unused RAM ...


7

One other part to the equation is how the memory sticks are configured. Specifically, modernish motherboards support dual-channel memory which allows you to double the bandwidth between your motherboard and memory; if you had paired memory and you took out 1 of each pair, you've lost this and so your memory access when doing a lot of memory transfers will ...


6

As you can see here it's on there list for 7 years. Electrolysis is available in the nightly version for half a year now, and that seem like the only possibility at the moment.


6

I'm going to answer somewhat generically. I don't know if this applies to Windows. (If you want an answer about Windows specifically, ask on Super User.) Think of the memory of a computer as a desk with lots of papers spread on it. When you need to read or write to a piece of paper, grab it from the desk. Sometimes the paper won't be on the desk, but in a ...


6

There are two ways a motherboard can provide more PCI-e lanes then the chipset provides: Some modern CPU's provide PCI-e lanes of their own. (in addition to the lanes provided by the chipset) There are PCI-e switches which provide extra PCI-e lanes. Think of this as an Y shape. The bottom of the Y can be 16 PCI-e lanes connected to the normal places on the ...


6

In general that is correct, RAM is mostly used for systems processes and is where your running programs store most of their information and use the most memory. For instance, if you look at the memory usage of something like Firefox, most of your memory usage is going to be your RAM. VRAM is used specifically for calls made to the video card through a ...


6

Perhaps not the answer you're looking for, but in my experience RAM makes more difference than either. SSDs have the biggest impact on start-up times. CPU makes a difference if you're doing CPU-intensive things - for me that's compiling, but most variants of PHP aren't compiled, so this may not apply. Since most modern OSes use extensive disk caching, more ...


6

Yes, Linux implementation of RAID1 speeds up disk read operations twice as long as two separate disk read operations are performed at a time. That means reading one 10GB file won't take any faster on RAID1 than on single disk, but reading two distinct 10GB files*will take faster. To demonstrate it, just read some data with dd. Before performing anything, ...


5

That value tells you nothing of what you want to know. Firstly, the cpu MHz value is subject to variable clock technologies, where the CPU throttles doing low load to save power. For example, your CPU is reported as running at 1200 MHz (1.2 GHz) instead of 2.6 GHz. If you would cat /proc/cpuinfo during high load, it would show a higher value. Secondly, the ...



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