Hot answers tagged

102

Larger SSDs from the same SSD model/family (comparing different models makes no sense) are faster when writing data because they use more Channels in parallel: while smaller ones only use few channel (4 instead of 8) because they have less NAND modules on it.


51

The higher capacity variants of an SSD model often get their higher capacity from simply having more NAND flash chips of the same type as the lower capacity variants. Having more flash chips allows for a design where the controller on the SSD can access more data in parallel, allowing for higher speeds.


46

You have a memory leak caused by a driver. Look at the high value of nonpaged kernel memory. In your case this is over 3.7 GB. You can use poolmon to see which driver is causing the high usage. Install the Windows WDK, run poolmon, sort it via P after pool type so that non paged is on top and via B after bytes to see the tag which uses most memory. Run ...


35

No, it would not improve performance. TL;DR: rotational magnetic hard disk drives don't work like that. First, when you write any given data to a rotational magnetic-storage drive, that data gets transformed into magnetic domains that may actually look very different from the bit pattern you are writing. This is done in part because it's much easier to ...


24

Your idea (as cool as it is) unfortunately won't work in practice: The RAM disk would be wiped whenever you turn your PC off, reboot it, or if you lose power. 16 GB is not enough RAM. Don't forget you need to keep some RAM aside to use as, you know, regular RAM. So at best you might be able to do a 12 GB RAM disk. Well, 12 GB doesn't meet Windows 10's ...


19

SSD is definitely a steroid to any system. Even machines already sentenced to scrap are revived by it. On the other hand, factory specifications really state that their statistical lifetime is smaller than that of HDDs. BUT today even the cheapest SSDs are sold with 3 years of guarantee. I doubt anyone can foresee what kind of gadgets we will use 3 years ...


18

This is completely normal to see such spikes on traditional (spinning) system drives. HD Tune's benchmark is designed to scan the drive outside-in (from beginning to end) so that it can draw the graph left-to-right. With this kind of scanning the header doesn't have to do long jumps and reliably measuring read/write speeds is possible. On your data drive ...


17

Windows 8 has "Hybrid Shutdown" enabled by default. In this mode, Windows doesn't shut down after logging you out, but enters hibernation. (Except when rebooting.) Disabling hibernation forces Windows to revert to fully shutting down and booting up.


13

Your question states speed is not a factor, but resources are. In this case, HDDs give you far greater GBs for your money than any SSD on the market currently. If you're after pure resource, HDDs would currently be your best option, depending on exactly how much extra resource you feel you need. However, I'm not sure you really mean that, as in the wrong set ...


12

Short Answer It's your graphics processor. I know that sounds like a bold claim, but to me it's completely obvious, having dealt with similar problems on similarly ancient systems before. You can't upgrade your graphics processor, so you will need to "downgrade" your software so that it isn't using such graphically-intensive methods to render the desktop, ...


11

this guy might have a Killer Networking (previously Bigfoot networking) brand network card. Was going crazy trying to figure out why I had a massive memory leak and even did a completely clean install and immediately after installing I had a memory leak. Of course I installed my network drivers and video card drivers but that was it. I searched Google... ...


11

Analyzing the ETL file with WPA shows, that the CPU usage doesn't come from system memory compression. It comes from ntoskrnl.exe!MiScrubMemoryWorker: Line #, DPC/ISR, Process, Stack Tag, Stack, Count, TimeStamp (s), % Weight 8, , , , | | |- ntoskrnl.exe!MiScrubMemoryWorker, 79667, , 12,45 9, , , , | | | ntoskrnl.exe!MiScrubNode, 79667, ...


10

The article you linked to answers your question. Memory optimizers are not only not needed, they are harmful. Free memory is no better than memory not installed in the device -- it has no effect on performance. Modern operating systems go to elaborate lengths to keep as little memory free as possible to gain maximum performance. You can clearly see in your ...


6

There seems little point in splitting an image file unless you're creating it on a FAT32 volume or network share that has file size restrictions. VMware has this to say: Select Split virtual disk into multiple files if the virtual disk is stored on a file system that has a file size limitation. Another reference has this to say: Choosing to split ...


6

Disadvantages of monolithic disks: If you delete snapshots and need to consolidate unused .vmdk files, if you need to defragment .vmdk files, etc., then your host needs as much free space as the entire .vmdk file. In contrast, if you use split disks, then your host needs only as much free space as one of the individual .vmdk extents. If you want to copy ...


6

Both the i7-4790K and the i7-6700K have very similar profiles, both have: a base clock of 4GHz 4 Cores / 8 Threads 8MB Cache Support for SSE4.1/4.2, AVX 2.0 Instruction Set Extensions However there are also slight differences in: the system bus architecture: DMI3 @ 8GT/S (i7-6700k) vs. DMI2 @ 5 GT/s (i7-4790k) Boostclock: 4.2 GHz (i7-6700k) vs 4.4 GHz(...


6

(which on a side note puzzles me as I would expect a CPU released 4 years later to be a lot more powerful). You are expecting something that just isn't (currently) true. CPUs have really plateaued over the last several years, so each generation is an incremental move toward better efficiency rather than a leap forward in raw computational power and clock ...


6

From 15 Windows 10 problems - and how to fix them : Like Windows 8 before it, Windows 10 uses a hybrid boot to enable fast boot times. When you shut the system down, apps and app processes are terminated, but the Windows kernel itself is hibernated to allow for a faster restart. In theory, it's great, but it seems to still be very slow for some ...


5

As a Core i7 processor, your CPU is equipped with Intel Turbo Boost. Your maximum clockspeed is 2.9 Ghz and NOT 2.0 Ghz: http://ark.intel.com/products/52219/Intel-Core-i7-2630QM-Processor-6M-Cache-up-to-2_90-GHz Intel® Core™ i7-2630QM Processor (6M Cache, up to 2.90 GHz) Processor Base Frequency 2 GHz Max Turbo Frequency 2.9 GHz What you ...


5

First, re. CPU usage: The "System and compressed memory" process (it's not a service) performs many functions. Just because you see it using CPU time does not mean it is doing work compressing memory contents. To find out, use Process Explorer to find the name(s) of the thread function(s) in the process that is (are) using CPU time. You'll need to configure ...


5

Let's pretend that SSD is using 32GB NAND chips for storage, so an 128G SSD need 4 of those chips to add up the space, and an 256G need 8 of the identical chips to make up the space, which means for read/write, on the 256G SSD it can R/W to 8 chips together rather than 128G's 4 chips, which make it much faster. But since there are other bottle necks, the ...


4

Memory Hard Faults have nothing to do with the 'brand' or 'quality' of the memory. It means that the software has requested an address and the page where it resides isn't still in main memory. Usually it has been swapped to virtual memory, (hard drive or SSD) and the OS will swap it back from virtual memory to physical memory. If you are getting massive ...


4

This is a known issue with Windows Update. Microsoft fixed this issue with the update KB3050265 in June 2015: Windows Update Client for Windows 7: June 2015 https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3050265 Fixes included in this update This update addresses an issue in which system performance can be decreased during scans. This issue has the ...


4

Absolutely not! The svchost.exe processes are, as the name implies, hosts for Windows services that don't require their own process. (They appear with the line TYPE: 20 WIN32_SHARE_PROCESS in the list generated by sc query.) Many important system functions run inside these processes, including: Windows Update (wuauserv) Windows Management Instrumentation (...


4

You say this: The question is: Would it improve the write performance for further write actions if the disk would be cleaned? With cleaned I mean fill the disk with zeros? 100% nope. Writing zeros to a disk does not improve performance. You would only do that to destroy data. So knowing that, you say this: So as far as I know, the actual data ...


4

Okay, let's take the easy question here. SSD's are particularly excellent at random reads. So long as you are reading a full block, it doesn't matter if you are doing so to a block immediately before or 'halfway across the disk'. It makes no practical difference. In fact, you can't even tell. Your operating system may think it is storing data in sequential ...


4

The big question is "Does this support AHCI" - which you'll need for maximum performance and things like trim to work. Even without it, an SSD is faster than a spinning rust drive - but its less of a obvious choice. You do want an SSD, and having it for swap should make some difference. AHCI support should tip the balance towards getting an SSD tho. ...


4

Powershell is a program written in .Net, but it leverages interfaces to many different interpreters and run-times when its actually running. Its a Shell, so just like BASH, even though it is written in C, that says nothing about the binaries and scripts executed within it. Executables might be .Net code, VDM/CMD commands, *nix shell commands, VB/C/WSScript, ...


3

I'm no kernel developer but I spent years philosophizing on this issue because I ran into this soooo many times. I actually came up with a metaphor for the whole situation so let me tell you that. I'll assume in my story that things like "swap" don't exist. Swap doesn't make much sense with 32 GB RAMs these days anyways. Imagine a neighborhood of yours ...


3

Six years later... This can be caused by overheating. Laptops tend to collect dust over time, which clogs their airways, their tiny fan, and the fins of the CPU heat sink. Also, The heat-conducting paste between the CPU and its heat sink tends to deteriorate over time, (especially if the CPU is subjected to extreme heat a few times,) and the result is, ...



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