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287

Here, I wrote a book by accident. Get some coffee first. Why does emptying disk space speed up computers? It doesn't, at least not on its own. This is a really common myth. The reason it is a common myth is because filling up your hard drive often happens at the same time as other things that traditionally could slow down† your computer. SSD ...


169

Running a high-performance GPU at full speed while on battery can damage the battery or require more power than the battery can safely supply High-performance mobile GPUs can require significant amounts of power to operate at full speed. The GTX 765M requires 75 W, while top-of-the-line mobile GPUs like the GTX 780M and GTX 980M can consume up to ...


159

This is a velociraptor. As you may notice, it's a 1tb, 2.5 inch drive inside a massive heatsink meant to cool it down. In essence, it's an 'overclocked' 2.5 inch drive. You end up having the worst of all worlds. It's not as fast at random reads/writes as an SSD in many cases, it doesn't match the storage density of a 3.5 inch drive (which goes up to 3-4 tb ...


110

Yes, because the operating system can use the extra RAM as disk cache, which speeds up access to data on disk. Extra RAM won't make CPU-bound computations (not involving much disk I/O) faster, though.


90

No matter how much RAM you have, you want the system to be able to use it efficiently. Having no paging file at all forces the operating system to use RAM inefficiently for two reasons. First, it can't make pages discardable, even if they haven't been either accessed or modified in a very long time, which forces the disk cache to be smaller. Second, it has ...


78

When you installed the second memory module, you enabled dual-channel mode and doubled memory bandwidth. GPU performance is highly dependent on memory bandwidth and your frame rates reflect the increase in bandwidth. The AMD A10-6790K is an "Accelerated Processing Unit" (APU). APUs combine a CPU with a relatively powerful integrated graphics processor ...


68

Not sure these justify picking a hard drive over a NAND-Flash SSD, but they are certainly areas that a 10,000 rpm hard drive would offer benefits over one. Write amplification. Hard drives can directly over-write a sector, but NAND-Flash SSDs cannot overwrite a page. The entire block must be erased, and then the page can be re-used. If there is other ...


56

Since every operating system manages memory differently, and none was given, I will answer in the context of Windows 7. Below is an example from a computer with 24GB of RAM. Even though only 7 GB is currently allocated as "In Use" memory, another 10 GB is allocated as "Standby" memory and contains data that may or may not be read again. If it is read, it ...


25

It really is not a straightforward answer to this. SSDs do not care about continuous writes as much as how many times any particular sector is overwritten. When SSDs first came out, something like SQL was a bad word as the operating system in general treated the drive like a traditional HDD and failures were very frequent. Since then, drives have become ...


22

In addition to Nathanial Meek's explanation for HDDs, there is a different scenario for SSDs. SSDs are not sensitive to scattered data because the access time to any place on the SSD is the same. The typical SSD access time is 0.1ms versus a typical HDD access time of 10 to 15ms. It is, however, sensitive to data that is already written on the SSD Unlike ...


22

Tons of bad answers here from people that obviously only know low end SSD. There is one reason - Price. Mostly if you do not need the performance. Once you need the IOPS budget a SSD (even in a Raid 5) gives you - anything else does not matter. 10K SAS/SATA drive: around 350 IOPS. SSD: The ones I use - last years model, etnerprise - 35000 Go figure - ...


20

You are entirely correct in your assumption. Memory management algorithms are very complex and by any means not perfect. So swapping occurs even when there is plenty of spare RAM. On some systems, like Linux, you can control swappiness, on others you can't. By swapping out data when there is still plenty of RAM, system in its own way prepares for the ...


18

Aside from cost, is there still a reason to choose a 10K RPM (or faster) hard drive over an SSD? Isn't it obvious? Capacity. SSDs simply can't compete on capacity. If you care that much more about performance than capacity and want a single disk solution, an SSD is for you. If you prefer more capacity, you can go with a raid array of HDDs to get ...


17

Reads are fine, and SSD's can have their bits read from without any detrimental effect. Writes are another matter. Clearing a bit affects the integrity of the bit and after a lot of sequential writes, the bit will stop accepting new writes altogether. It can however still be read. Let me just say that the write limits on new enterprise drives are huge. ...


16

Most graphics cards (and even integrated cards) will have a graphics control panel (Catalyst, Intel, etc) - open the graphics control panel and dig around for power-related options. I know I've seen such things myself in both Intel and AMD panels.


16

With equal amounts of memory in both slots, memory can be "interleaved" so that successive chunks of memory alternate slots. That way, memory accesses get distributed to both slots almost perfectly evenly, allowing their bandwidth to combine. With uneven amounts, memory cannot be interleaved and has to be mapped first to one stick and then to the other. A ...


16

If the operating system is only using 4GB out of 8GB, it will run no differently to a machine using 4GB out of 16GB. The ram that is unused has no impact on the performance of the machine. However, the ideal situation is for the OS to use almost all available RAM. The OS and applications will request what they need, and the remaining ram should be used as ...


15

Speaking as a Storage Engineer, we've been deploying flash across the environment. The reasons we aren't doing so faster are: cost. It remains eye wateringly expensive (especially for 'enterprise grade') - may not look like much on a 'per server' basis, but adds up to shockingly large numbers when you're talking multiple petabytes. density. It's related ...


15

Pretty simple—because the battery can't provide enough power, so the GPU and CPU will run at lower clock speeds. Sadly, there's nothing you can do about it. I had a laptop with a GeForce GT 540M GPU and I could play games unplugged without any problems. However, when I later upgraded to a laptop with a GT 650M, I couldn't play anything while unplugged—the ...


14

You have an APU, rather than a discrete CPU and discrete GPU. That means that they share system RAM for the texture cache, rather than dedicated on-board memory on a graphics card. The reason the RAM upgrade sped things up for your game likely is because of texture resource swapping. With more RAM available overall, that means more texture data is able to ...


12

Somewhere inside a traditional hard disk is a spinning metal platter where the individual bits and bytes are actually encoded. As data is added to the platter, the disk controller stores it on the outside of the disk first. As new data is added space is used moving towards the inside of the disk last. With this in mind, there are two effects that cause disk ...


12

Writing to SSDs isn't necessarily bad. It's the writing and rewriting of a single block that's bad. Meaning if you write a file delete it then write it again, or make small amounts of changes to a file over and over again. This causes wear on the SSD's. Databases would definitely fit into this category. However according to this article, petabytes of ...


11

Can you safely disable the pagefile? If you run out of free memory, including virtual memory, the system cannot continue to guarantee deterministic execution, and ends itself. Before that happens, the operation system will do various other things such as killing programs that use too much memory. What I want to say is, memory is always finite, and every OS ...


10

Designing a processor to deliver high performance is far more than just increasing the clock rate. There are numerous other ways to increase performance, enabled through Moore's law and instrumental to the design of modern processors. Clock rates can't increase indefinitely. At first glance, it may seem that a processor simply executes a stream of ...


10

Your question is excellent and provides incredibly useful details, thanks! Here are my suggestions, in no particular order. A: What is that RollBack splash screen on startup? This could be a reason for slow startup times but personally even if it was absolute crap, I would still expect Win7 to load normally once "Rollback" was was finished. B: You have a ...


10

Most Windows laptops have quite a few more options than just power saver, balanced and high performance. In Windows 7 and later, you can access the "advanced" power options, and it would present you with a list of all the various components in the laptop and how much power they should get while plugged in as opposed to while on battery. I think you will ...


9

When using virtual hard drives, regardless of use with or without a virtual machine, you can improve performance by hosting the virtual hard drive file on it's own physical drive to avoid IO being lost, because the host OS is using it. You can also improve performance by using a pre-allocated space, instead of a dynamically expanding virtual hard drive. ...


8

The article you linked to answers your question. Memory optimizers are not only not needed, they are harmful. Free memory is no better than memory not installed in the device -- it has no effect on performance. Modern operating systems go to elaborate lengths to keep as little memory free as possible to gain maximum performance. You can clearly see in your ...


7

To reiterate what others have said, moving swap to a straight RAM disk is rather pointless (in the most common case, see below). It achieves that at certain point, when the system is starved for free memory, some data is moved from RAM to RAM in a rather inefficient way. Having swap on HDD/SSD achieves that the OS can clear out some completely unused RAM ...


7

In general that is correct, RAM is mostly used for systems processes and is where your running programs store most of their information and use the most memory. For instance, if you look at the memory usage of something like Firefox, most of your memory usage is going to be your RAM. VRAM is used specifically for calls made to the video card through a ...



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