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You may be running ssh-keygen on the wrong file. ssh-keygen -y operates on a private key file. ".pub" files normally contain the public key. You probably have a file there named my_key, without any extension, and it ought to be mode 0700. That is the file which should contain the private key. To directly answer your question, SSH keys are normally used to ...


0

Yes, It looks as if SELinux is the culprit: The -Z switch will work with most utilities to show SELinux security contexts (e.g, 'ls -Z', 'ps axZ' etc). $ ll -Z /var/www/html/hello -rw-r--r--. root root unconfined_u:object_r:httpd_sys_content_t:s0 /var/www/html/hello $ ll -Z /tmp/hello -rw-r--r--. root root unconfined_u:object_r:user_tmp_t:s0 ...


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0644 in not supposed to be too open for a public key, but is too open for your private key. Your private key should have permission 0600 while your public key have permission 0644. By the way, you should also take care of the permission on .ssh folder. It should has the permission 0700, so that only you, the owner, has control over the folder. As to your ...


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Are you setting FollowSymlinks in an .htaccess file? or in a <Directory> block? Apache documentation suggests that FollowSymlinks will only work in these contexts - could you post the relevant config? (posting as an answer due to insufficient points to comment)


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As conjectured by TheUser1024 and confirmed by the OP, the problem seems to be that “Users” don’t have Read & Execute permission to regedit.exe.


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You can take ownership of the whole /media/usb0/ directory: sudo chown -R $USER:$USER /media/mnt If you are using a desktop environment, it's automount daemon should take care of mounting the volume with correct permissions. Just make sure to remove /media/usbX lines from /etc/fstab If the volume is NTFS, make sure you have ntfs-3g installed.


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Have you tried restoring to an earlier time through safemode? "The User Profile Service Failed The Logon"


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A little late to the party but chattr +a (optionally -R for recursive) will allow you to create new files but not delete them. The +a flag forces append only to the directory (whereas +i forces it to be immutable). What this means is that when you try to delete a file, the OS will try to remove it from the directory which will fail, causing the entire ...


1

This is, unfortunately, one of the most confusing things about file sharing on Unixes. And I'm bad at explaining confusing things. What you see in ls -l output (for example), is the remote user's ID translated from the perspective of the local system. When programs like ls use the standard functions to look up file information, the filesystem driver can ...


0

The owner is the root user on the remote machine. If you want to have access to it as root on the remote machine you'll have to mount it as root on the remote machine. In other words, this should work (local user aye, remote user root): aye@ayes-machine$ sshfs root@bees-machine:/path /local-path This won't work (local user root, remote user bee): ...


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Resetting the profile has been the only way we've found to fix this.


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Modify the search location of the user. The computer is not indexing all the fiules in the Computer fro that user. Open control panel -> indexing options (shamless plug: search for indexing option) then Modify and selected thhe drives to be indexed. as shown Select the drives that you want to be indexed and wait for the list to be populated


2

You should look up file-based ACLs (FACL), as they're made to do what you are looking to do. The short version is you set the partition in question to track file-based acl permissions by editing your /etc/fstab and add the "acl": option: #example /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol02 / ext3 defaults,acl 1 1 Then you set the appropriate FACL on the directory you ...


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It's not possible to add a domain user to the local groups of a machine that is not domain-joined. What you can do, that may or may not work, is create a local user with the same username and password of the domain user and make it a local administrator.


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Your PC must be a member of the domain in order to add domain members to any local group. If you make a VPN connection, you can then add your pc to the domain and set the rights. Note that you'll need to have the domain's administrator username and password to accomplish this. Once your pc is a member of a domain, you should be able to add any user to the ...


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udisks2 intentionally makes removable devices private to the user. (By design, Linux is a multi-user system, and can potentially have several people having separate seats (displays, keyboards, USB ports) and connecting their own USB drives, so they should be separate from each other.) So all per-user directories under /run/media are limited to their owner ...


3

You're completely right. /tmp should be a symbolic link to /private/tmp/ user@host:~ # uname -a ; ll -d@ /tmp Darwin host.local 13.2.0 Darwin Kernel Version 13.2.0: Thu Apr 17 23:03:13 PDT 2014; root:xnu-2422.100.13~1/RELEASE_X86_64 x86_64 lrwxr-xr-x@ 1 root wheel 11B Oct 23 2013 /tmp -> private/tmp com.apple.FinderInfo 32B I should add that ...


0

When a process creates a file on unix, the process controls what permissions are assigned to the file. The process specifies a set of permissions, typically 0666 or 0777, in the file-creation system call. The permissions are modified by the process's umask to produce the actual permissions for the file. Special flags on the parent directory are not part of ...


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I didnt check much, but I tried 2-3 times with different group permissions on a local server. What I get here is that, what ever permissions are given to the file at the local system are exactly the same permissions got by the file at the remote server.


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For default permissions its "-d". So you can use this: setfacl -d -m g:group1:rwx "Main directory owned by group2 user" Also do check the effective rights with getfacl. You may have to set the mask also.


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The solution to my problem was as follows: @echo off cls mkdir C:\Users\Administrator\Desktop\Test net share testcase="C:\Users\Administrator\Desktop\Test" /UNLIMITED /grant:Administrator,FULL /grant:Administrators,FULL This by default removed the Everyone group from the advanced sharing permissions. Added the Administrator User with Full permissions. ...


1

Debians deb packages are simple things, all files the package is going to install is stored in an archive. This archive contains the full tree of files, and also their permissions and ownership data. During install, the archive is extracted into the root filesystem as is. An Example The package fping contains an archive with the follwing files: ...


0

If you mount your filesystem with acl support (i.e. /etc/fstab has acl in the options [4th] field for that filesystem), you can use the setfacl command to set default permissions for newly created files and directories: setfacl -d -m u::rwx,g::rwx,o::rwx /target/directory Now when any user creates directories inside of /target/directory/, those new dirs ...


0

I'd try creating a user with access to the web directory, which is writable by ScreenCloud. Make sure that the directory that you are saving to includes the entire directory: Next, create a user that has access to the web directory. Do useradd screencloud and passwd screencloud then you can grant all permissions on the www directory to the user with ...


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Instead of using mkdir (I'm guessing that is what you are using now), try using: install -d -m 0777 /new/dir/ That will create a new dir called /new/dir/ with full permissions (like chmod 777). The other solution is to use proper umask values for the user creating the directories. Please review this thread for more info and an example. After ...


0

9 bytes received so far Same issuer here with this exact number of received bytes. Check that the user has permissions to write the target folder. This solved the issue for me.


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How I solved my problem was by this: adding permissions to my options, making my /etc/fstab entry like this: UUID=<uuid> /os ntfs-3g hide_hid_files,hide_dot_files,windows_names,no_def_opts,big_writes,permissions 0 0 For those of you who are curious, here's my reasoning. The permissions option uses standard access control, while the acl option ...


2

Amazon EC2 is built like Ubuntu: no root access and everything is done with sudo instead. What your sudo command did was try to impersonate postgres, requiring permission to do so. ec2-user does not have this permission, so sudo will ask for a password (which will fail because it doesn't have one). When you did sudo sudo, you are invoking the second sudo ...


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Finally i got it by following this procedure, Right click on F Drive ->properties->security->Select Group or user name->click edit and then type the object name to select 'Everyone' ->Click OK and you'll be returned to the Permissions dialog. Click on "Everyone", and then click on the "Full Control" check box. ->Click on OK. After that open the Command ...


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This is standard behavior. It will add the permissions you set to those folders, but marks them as child permissions. Go to a subfolder, and check its permissions, and you'll notice those permissions are greyed out (child permissions). If you want to have the child objects not have these permissions, you'll have to edit the first child folder and correct ...


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Here are some other pages discussing the issue. The first is about scp, while the second is about 000 permissions with another programs: http://askubuntu.com/questions/124944/incorrect-permissions-after-copying-over-scp http://stackoverflow.com/questions/5828037/cygwin-sets-file-permission-to-000 ...


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This happened to me once, and it turned out to be a remote computer which had the share folder open. Use Handle to find out what process is holding the file (It was System in my case) Try to close the Handle: handle.exe -c E14 -p 4. Your file handle will be found in the output of your search for the file handle, and the processid will likely be the same ...


0

I am running FreeNAS as a VM. My permissions were not sticking. I went to the FreeNAS server and opened a shell. Run zfs list to find the path. cd /PATH Find the directory that needs changing. Since I didn't have anything in that directory I was able to use a -R in the following for recursive: chown -R nobody:nogroup directory ls -l # to verify ...


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chmod +x /usr/bin/* In case your chmod binary is in /usr/bin you could try to sftp a copy of the file in from another host. Or boot from live CD, mount the right filesystem, and chmod +x the file.


0

Maybe the permissions are not on all the sub-directories. Try taking ownership and replacing it all the way down, and then try to force your permissions as well. If that doesn't help, you can always do what ever you want from an external Live-OS like HBCD or WinPE.


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You have to enable "root" login from the FreeNAS GUI if you want to use the "root" user over ssh. (which in the ssh best practice config, is DON'T DO IT). I use my user to ssh in to the FreeNAS and Then "su" up to the root user. Or you can allow your user sudo access. http://doc.freenas.org/index.php/SSH & http://doc.freenas.org/index.php/Users


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According to Wikipedia, Administrative shares cannot be accessed by users without administrative privileges. In order to access \\computername\c$ at all, the service account must be a member of the Local Administrators group. The same goes for \\computername\admin$. I tried to get around that by creating a new share called Users$ mapped to ...


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An administrator will always be able to take ownership and delete the folder if they have a clue. Right Click > Properties > SECURITY tab > ADVANCED button Click Disable Inheritance Click "Convert inherited permissions..." Select the "USERS (COMPUTERNAME\USERS)" group and click edit Click "Show advanced permissions" Now you are able to remove the two ...


2

It might be that the /media/cdrom0 filesystem has the noexec flag set. You can check this with: mount -v | grep cdrom0 If there is noexec between the parentheses, files on the filesystem are not executable. (like (noexec,nosuid,nodev)) You can try remounting the filesystem with the exec flag: sudo mount -o remount,exec /media/cdrom0 Alternatively you ...


-1

go to terminal and type gksudo nautilus then go to system drive(computer) and right click and select permissions and change owner to your username and save


0

Not only did you change the permissions on files, you may have changed directories and devices nodes. (According to the chmod man page, chmod never changes symlink permissions so at least those are safe.) On CentOS 6.x, it is possible to find the package which installed a particular file with $ rpm -q -f /bin/ls coreutils-8.4-19.el6.x86_64 and then look ...


0

The only way to do this without scripting is to make a shortcut for each user to the command runas.exe /user:<domainname>\<username> "windows.exe <uncpathname>" i.e. Mary's Files.lnk -> runas.exe /user:ourdomain\mary "windows.exe \\fileserver\mary$" Steve's Files.lnk -> runas.exe /user:ourdomain\steve "windows.exe \\fileserver\steve$" ...



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