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32

If you want to add an user ID to an existing key from the command line (your input is in bold): $ gpg --edit-key <key-id> gpg> adduid Real Name: <name> Email address: <email> Comment: <comment or Return to none> Change (N)ame, (C)omment, (E)mail or (O)kay/(Q)uit? O Enter passphrase: <password> gpg> uid ...


23

Both SKS Keyserver Pool (stats) and PGP Global Directory are online. I usually use sks-keyservers, since it consists of many servers which synchronize their databased continuously, while Global Directory is a single, commercially operated server. There also exist pgp.mit.edu (stats) aka cryptonomicon.mit.edu (not part of SKS pool, but does sync with other ...


17

Why Use PGP? -- probably fits your size. PGP is useful for two things: 1. Privacy and Security, and 2. Authenticity. By privacy, I mean that you can prevent people from seeing things. For example, you can encrypt an email to someone, or encrypt a file with a list of passwords. By Authenticity, I mean that you can ensure a message was sent/written ...


14

S/MIME and PGP are incompatible, but they do use similar concepts (asymmetric encryption and public key certificates). The biggest difference is that S/MIME is based on X.509 public key infrastructure and has the same issues as with SSL: if you want a certificate that will be shown as "valid" to other users, you have to obtain one from a CA that everyone ...


11

Yes, both GnuPG and the commercial PGP.com are implementations of the same OpenPGP standard; in fact, GnuPG was specifically designed to be PGP-compatible. The only differences you might encounter are: Different supported algorithms. For example, GnuPG supports the Camellia encryption algorithm, while PGP.com does not. This is almost never a problem, ...


11

With GnuPG, the original filename can be seen in gpg --list-packets. $ gpg --list-packets test.gpg :pubkey enc packet: version 3, algo 1, keyid CE7B5510340F19EF data: [4095 bits] :encrypted data packet: length: 67 mdc_method: 2 gpg: encrypted with 4096-bit RSA key, ID CE7B5510340F19EF, created 2009-10-31 "Mantas Mikulėnas ...


10

Since it has not been mentioned: this is known as a known-plaintext attack, and would be a very bad vulnerability for a cipher to have. In fact, in public-key crypto this attack is equivalent to a chosen-plaintext attack, since anyone can encrypt any message! There have in fact been some known/chosen-plaintext attacks against RSA (the public-key cipher ...


10

It turns out that it is possible (and relatively simple) to delete and re-import the key, provided that it is on a keyserver (and provided that the revocation has not been sent to the keyserver, of course). This is what I found to work (THEKEYID is the short ID of the key): Delete the public key as follows (the --expert option allows the public key to be ...


9

Well, this is a bit embarrassing. I've spent hours over the course of a week trying to figure this problem out, and the answer appears to lie with subkeys--a topic the GnuPG manual and FAQ glosses over. While researching what subkeys are and why they might be used instead of --gen-key, I stumbled across this gem: http://wiki.debian.org/subkeys. Debian's ...


8

Why do people share their PGP Keys? Because without giving someone your public key, they can't encrypt data that your private key can decrypt or confirm that your digital signature was created by your private key. Wikipedia has what appears to be a decent article on the subject. How can we sent an authenticated mail using a PGP Key? Usually by ...


8

No. that is the point of asymmetric keys (public and private) as you can easily encode a message with the public key (that's what it is for) you have the de- and encrypted message. But decrypting the encrypted message is only possible with the private key. The private key can not be regenerated.


8

Yes, it's possible – practically all PGP software will let you add multiple recipients when encrypting; no additional configuration is needed.


7

All GPG keys are stored in the "keyring", which is at ~/.gnupg or %AppData%/gnupg. Running gpg --version will show the path being used. The usual way of sharing keys is to export them to a file... gpg -a --export my.email@example.com > mypubkey.asc ...or to publish it on a keyserver and give others the key ID along with the fingerprint: gpg ...


7

With PGP, or other public-key encryption methods, no, this is not possible. You must have their public key to encrypt the file to them. There are other methods of encryption, however. The most common would be called "shared-secret", and this includes things like ZIP file encryption or RAR file encryption. You essentially encrypt the file using a ...


6

Assuming that you use Enigmail for GPG support in Thunderbird, you can simply use the "OpenGPG Security" Tab for each of your identities. You can get there via Account Preferences -> Manage Identities -> Edit. Alternatively, you can select from the Menu: OpenPGP -> Key Management -> [Right-click on your key] -> Manage User IDs And then ...


6

Yes, additional security is necessary. No, your home router or ISP can't intercept the packets. But then why is additional security still necessary? If you decide to use Tor for being anonymous but still use personal information then your data will be safe from your PC till the last hop within the Tor network, but the endpoint can monitor your traffic if ...


6

For GnuPG, it's done like this. Import the key: gpg --import key.asc Decrypt the file: gpg --decrypt file.pgp For PGP Command Line, it's mostly the same: pgp --import key.asc pgp --decrypt file.pgp


6

There is no way to "upgrade" an OpenPGP key. You will have to create a new one, and you will loose your reputation in the web of trust. Think about: Giving your new key with the old one, so other could follow the signatures Revoking the old one after some time Using a seemingly unnecessary large key as primary key and smaller subkeys for day-to-day usage. ...


5

No this would be very bad. PGP encryption uses a serial combination of hashing, data compression, symmetric-key cryptography and finally public-key cryptography. Hashing makes use of one-way functions. A one-way function is a function that is easy to compute, but hard to invert. Public-key cryptography makes use of asymmetric algorithms. The algorithms ...


5

Easy: gpg --export my_key -o my_public_key.gpg gpg --export-secret-key my_key -o my_secret_key.gpg Then: gpg --import my_public_key.gpg gpg --allow-secret-key-import --import my_secret_key.gpg


5

On Linux, I'd tarball and compress the files first, then encrypt them. I do not believe GPG can encrypt multiple files in one go.


5

You cannot move single keys or even keypairs, but you can move the entire keyring: Move GnuPG data directory (~/.gnupg; on Windows %APPDATA%\.gnupg) to your chosen location. For extra security, copy and secure-wipe instead of just moving (which does an insecure deletion). Set the GNUPGHOME environment variable to the new location. System Properties → ...


5

I'm doing some research about this topic and I can give you some hints, but I've not found a way to make it work yet. Monkeysphere Monkeysphere seems a very interesting project, but I've not been able to compile it under Mac OS X without clogging my little free diskspace with MacPorts. Using gpgkey2ssh The first way I suggest you to try is to generate a ...


4

You can’t. If you want to use PGP, then you need their key to encrypt it with. An alternate solution is to zip/rar/7z/etc. the files, specifying a password. Obviously it requires giving them the password, but then you could encrypt a text file with the password with their public key when they get one; that would be out-of-band in a way.


4

Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) is a data encryption and decryption computer program that provides cryptographic privacy and authentication for data communication. PGP is often used for signing, encrypting and decrypting texts, E-mails, files, directories and whole disk partitions to increase the security of e-mail communications. Cryptography is the science ...


4

Yes, the OpenPGP "secret key" and "secret subkey" packets contain both public and private parameters. You can verify this by using pgpdump to examine the exported key: $ gpg --export-secret-key grawity | pgpdump Old: Secret Key Packet(tag 5)(1854 bytes) Ver 4 - new Public key creation time - Sat Oct 31 14:54:03 EET 2009 Pub alg - RSA Encrypt or ...


4

TL;DR a flash drive or a CD in a safe place. Seeing as this is a security question, I would be very hesitant to entrust my private key to Google or any other major cloud service. Call me paranoid, but your PGP key is your signature. I hate to remind you of the simple, but with your PGP key I "am" you. Personally, I would back up my key across any/all ...


4

To see what GnuPG is doing, have a look at this 2010-09-20 announcement : The last 9 months of GnuPG development.


4

You can use pathfinder sites like Henk P. Penning's pathfinder, although they need you to push the keys to specific keyservers. There's also the sigtrace tool, but that one requires that you import all the intermediate keys in your keyring, which can generate quite a lot of noise.



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